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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a great book, very funny.
This book is about the Author's life in the British 22nd Special Air Service. It is writen in a very informal, humorus way, quite amusing to read about some of his escapades in desert and jungle warfare. It gives an amusing insight into the history of the Special Air Service. The author was involved in some of the most dangerous and sensitive operations that the SAS has...
Published on 10 Nov. 2000 by donnie919@aol.com

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not so funny
Without a shadow of a doubt Peter Scholey is a rare man. Any one who can achieve SAS status, let alone remain in the unit for 20 years is to be admired. However, I felt that the book overview is a bit missleading. Scholey doesn't demonstrate how he helped set up any sort of CRW team which lead to the iconic rescue at the Iranian Embassy. He harks on about how he's a...
Published on 9 Sept. 2011 by Mr. P. Shields


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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's a great book, very funny., 10 Nov. 2000
This review is from: The Joker (Paperback)
This book is about the Author's life in the British 22nd Special Air Service. It is writen in a very informal, humorus way, quite amusing to read about some of his escapades in desert and jungle warfare. It gives an amusing insight into the history of the Special Air Service. The author was involved in some of the most dangerous and sensitive operations that the SAS has been involved with, it is very interesting. A must read for anybody interested in the army and the SAS.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Met the man, 8 May 2010
By 
C. Todd (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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I was reminded of Pete last week (Apr/10) when he appeared on the TV in Channel 4s "SAS The Real Story". I met him in Ecuador about 7 years ago when he was guest speaker for the Caledonian Society. The Chieftain was a much younger ex SAS chap from Dalkeith who had invited him and I think there were 5 other SAS guys there either on security work in Ecuador or passing through to other South American countries. Obviously there's a lot of security work, either personal security for executives or security on oilfield instalations. The meeting place was Albert Crutcher's Bar in Quito.

First, and probably only time, I've had a chance to meet an ex SAS member (knowingly anyway). I was there as a musician but Im also a bit of a military buff (grandfather in the Argyll's in WW1 etc) and I have to say these guys were the most down to earth, unpretentious individuals you could ever meet (unlike the one tobacco chewing ex US Navy Seal also present). Pete was a fund of interesting stories, if prompted, but he was as happy to listen as to talk. Considering what these guys go through to achieve that coveted badge I was well impressed with all of them. So yes read the book, you'll enjoy it, and hope that one day you'll meet the man.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The first SAS autobiography played for laughs., 7 Oct. 1999
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This review is from: The Joker: Twenty Years in the SAS (Hardcover)
Pete Scholey is a very funny man. Every SAS autobiography that I've read has been pompous, macho and testosterone-packed: Scholey completely subverts this by blowing the whistle on what actually happened.
A typical example took place in the jungles of Borneo: Scholey got stuck up a tree when a helicopter winch broke and he was then attacked by an irate orang-utan. Unable to escape, he was forced to shoot the ape, but the rest of the patrol, on the ground two hundred feet below him had no idea what had happened and assumed that the man-shaped object falling out of the tree was him. One of Scholey's mates then tried to break 'Pete's' fall, only to have a quarter ton dead orang-utan land on him.
The whole book is filled with stories like that: tremendous!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not so funny, 9 Sept. 2011
By 
Mr. P. Shields (UK) - See all my reviews
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Without a shadow of a doubt Peter Scholey is a rare man. Any one who can achieve SAS status, let alone remain in the unit for 20 years is to be admired. However, I felt that the book overview is a bit missleading. Scholey doesn't demonstrate how he helped set up any sort of CRW team which lead to the iconic rescue at the Iranian Embassy. He harks on about how he's a Joker, a laugh, a real lad, and yet demonstrates little humour and reminds me of the kid at school who was an irritant not funny.
This may seem harsh but then you buy a book on the premise of what is within. To buy this expecting to see a real character would be a mistake. To buy it to read of the metal of these amazing men, and one man's great tale of staying in the unit for two decades is a better reason, and in that guise it will not leave you wanting.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars fun to read, not really funny, 3 Oct. 2009
By 
Rob (The Hague, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
While an okay book to read, it doesn't live up to it's title. But then again, humor is subjective. And I didn't read it for laughs.
Written in an easy-to-read schoolboy's "what I did on my summer vacation" style (which may explain the so-called humorous parts) it was informative, but not highly enlightening.
A nice book to kill a few hours with, not memorable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting perspective of the SAS, 23 May 2010
By 
Nick Brett (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
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The author spent over 20 years in the SAS and this book is his story, but also shows how the SAS changed and developed during his service. Expect not much recent stuff, he retired just after the Iranian Embassy siege but do expect a light but interesting view of life in the SAS through (mainly) the 60s and 70's. It is full of characters and anecdotes and the author never puffs himself up mainly having a focus on what was going on around him rather then boasting about himself. Despite being the best soldiers in the world, he and his colleagues obviously had a whale of a time. Despite being a fairly lightweight and easy to read book (part of it's charm) you do become emotionally attached to some of the characters and when you find some are no longer with us you feel a real sense of loss for some very brave men and real characters.
Both interesting and funny and I hope the author continues his retirement in good health.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Honest book, 2 May 2012
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This book is a good read based on this guys impressive career, however I have to agree that it didn't live up to the title as he didn't inject enough of the typical Army banter and humour I had expected. Don't get me wrong I did sit chuckling to myself while reading this while on holiday and I could relate to some of the incidents and situations.

The book wasn't what I expected but never the less it was a good honest book that didn't portray the SAS as supermen while taking nothing away from what they are, an elite group of highly skilled soldiers.

I did enjoy this book and would recommend it, if you are looking for old school SAS soldiering. Enjoy!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent book,, 16 Jan. 2009
By 
Mr. Andrew R. Poole (Swansea) - See all my reviews
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I purchased this book after seeing the ratings previously obtained and my love for this type of book. Having finished it in around two days it was certainly readable. Scholesey obviously lives upto his name of the Joker and I found myself laughing aloud at some of his anecdotes.

However, whilst his account of his basic training is very enjoyable there is not a lot of detailed accounts about his postings abroad. You cant take anything away from the soldiers but there did seem to be a slightly unprofessional account to some of the casulties in the book. I did enjoy it, but think about purchasing "Mike Curtis - Close Quarter Battle" which was an even better account, possibly helped by the fact that it covers more recent times.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Joker, 11 Dec. 2011
Peter Scholey's Book The Joker is a great read following Peter's Army life from a Boy Soldier to entering into the SAS. Although the book follows peter's life through the tough times in Jungle, Artic and Desert warfare there is alwys a thread of humour which enables these tough soldiers to cope with constant dangers and sad losses of comrades.
A great read and highly reccomended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very personal account of the SAS, 26 Mar. 2009
By 
Roy Brookes "roybrookes" (Hamburg, Germany) - See all my reviews
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I enjoyed the book. It was interesting that some of the same characters appeared as in Barry Davies' Heroes of the SAS, such as Taff Springles and Captain Letts. Peter Scholey has certainly been there, done that and bought the t-shirt. He makes no secret of the fact that he acted the prat on occasions and his humour was not always appreciated, but on the whole the book is good, factual and also funny. I loved the story of the orang utan (quoted by another reviewer here).
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The Joker: Twenty Years in the SAS
The Joker: Twenty Years in the SAS by Peter Scholey (Hardcover - 4 Oct. 1999)
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