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4.7 out of 5 stars
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4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 13 May 2013
Lucinda Hawksley's book chronicles the struggles women faced and the hardships they endured to obtain the right to vote in the United Kingdom. I highly recommended March, Women, March for its insight into the lives of the women who refused to let men 'keep them in their place'. First and foremost, March, Women, March provides a historical account of the women's movement but it is as much a 'good read' as documentary.

Hawksley's book contains intriguing excerpts from letters and diaries of the time and brings to light a number of lesser known facts including Winston Churchill's schemes to undermine the movement and the fact that women in New Zealand and Australia received the right to vote over thirty years before women in the U.K.

March, Women, March recounts the persecutions women suffered and the extreme measures they were forced to take in their quest for equality. Thoroughly interesting, well-written and immensely educational - March, Women, March is a must read for women of all ages and a great book for women to share with their male friends, sons and spouses!
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on 30 July 2013
Ms Hawksley is to be commended for producing a factual book that is also a very enjoyable read. So often books of this genre are either dumbed down or resort to mere speculation in an effort to hold the reader's interest, this book does neither. The facts are presented to the reader in such a way that one is loathe to put it down.

Despite the reviews I was expecting the usual book on female suffrage - that is - the author going on at length about the Pankhursts and force feeding.
I was both surprised and delighted to find this book is full review of female suffrage and, unlike so many, it does not start and end with the WSPU and the Pankhursts. It is a welcome change to find a book on this subject that charts not only the history of female suffrage but the "back story" - such as the brave women who fought for women to allowed to own property,become doctors, and be treated fairly in divorce cases. Reading some books on the subject one could be forgiven for thinking that only the Pankhursts and Upper class women were involved in the movement. Ms Hawksley is at pains to mention the amount of other organisations involved which, of course, span the social classes. The non militant NUWSS gets the recognition it richly deserves. Unlike so many books this is not a hagiography of the Pankhursts and surprising facts emerge.
The book is packed with women fighting in the cause of suffrage, many are not well known today, but they all richly deserve their place in the history of the movement.
An excellent buy.
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on 21 October 2013
I have given 5 stars because I was half expecting a book which just listed names and dates or dwelled over long on hunger strikers. As it was I found the book really interesting. It introduced much that I did not know about the subject and the brave women who fought for me to have the vote. I would like to see this as required reading in schools lest we forget. Interesting, informative and entertaining. Who could ask for more?
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on 27 February 2014
Beautifully written and exhaustivly researched. I learned SO much more about the origins and development of the womens campaign to vote. I only knew the bare bones of the story (Pankhurst and the Kings' Racehorse), but this really informed me as fully as possible about womens rights and the desperate inequalities that pervaded much of history. Some of the facts surrounding divorce and husbands rights and the views of the political and judicial systems seem unimaginable in this day and age. Not a fight for equality, but to take an equal share and responsibility for the government of the country, and the right to chose whatever level of independance suited them as human beings. Glad I read this.
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on 11 November 2014
This is an interesting book. For example, I had not fully realised how disadvantaged women were in the early and mid-nineteenth century, nor was I fully aware of the general discontent that surrounded the Trafalgar Square riots in 1887. I also learnt a lot about the development of the women's suffrage movement (and divisions in it). The behaviour of the police and the anti-suffrage mobs seems remarkable a hundred years later, but at the same time there was similar opposition and aggressive behaviour towards Irish Home Rule. It is interesting how worked up people could get towards causes which, at least in hindsight, were quite reasonable.

The book brings together several threads and gives the correct impression of achievement and eventual success, although of course the cause of equality and opportunities for women had by no means been won by the late 1920s, when the book ends.

My only criticism of the book is that it contains too many lengthy quotes, giving the impression of undue padding. But certainly it is worth reading.
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on 6 July 2013
I really enjoyed this book for the detail and knowledge it portrayed. I deliver women's service for a living so have a general interest in the subject, but there was much here and I didn't know and the datelines are truly fascinating. There were so many other women beyond those that are well known that did so much to try and further women's rights - it was also interesting to read about those (men and women) who were absolutely opposed and their reasons....this will be re read over the years and remain a constant on my bookshelf!!
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on 3 July 2013
An excellent account of the women's suffrage movement that reads like a novel. The lessons & arguments today are very similar, perhaps the geography has just changed. There's a great deal of work to be done & this book is a good place to start.
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on 5 August 2014
Bought this for my goddaughter who is studying this period for GCSE History. She was thrilled. It's an academic book, but written in a very approachable style and the information is just enough to whet her enthusiasm without her feeling bogged down. Plus there are so many people and events mentioned which she can pursue for further research. A good choice.
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on 23 June 2014
If you want a straightforward history of the women's suffrage movement this books gives it. The amount of detail is slightly uneven and the writing doesn't always flow smoothly but the story of the fight for electoral representation is
clearly presented.
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on 16 June 2014
Couldn't put this down, a heartbraking account of the women abused and tortured for their determination to achieve their rights. Essential reading for all women and if this doesn't encourage women to turn out to vote, then these women's suffering was in vain.
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