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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on 25 November 2012
This is the 2013 Edition of our favourite astronomical almanac; as always edited by Sir Patrick Moore. Here is a detailed description of the contents:

1. The usual star charts drawn for +52N (London) and -35S (Cape Town, Sydney) latitudes.

2. A few pages about "The Planets and the Ecliptic", "Phases of the Moon in 2013", "Longitudes of the Sun, Moon and Planets in 2013" and "Some Events in 2013".

3. The observer's monthly notes (January to December) enriched as always with additional scientific and historical notes that are hard to find elsewhere:

January: A Serendipitous Discovery (Galileo's observations of Neptune), Oppositions of the Planets
February: Asteroid's Near Miss (Asteroid 2012 DA14 2013 close approach), A Remarkable Procession of Meteors (1913 Canada fireballs), The Power of the Naked Eye
March: A Naked Eye Comet (Comet C/2011 L4), The Old Moon in the New Moon's Arms, Ursa Major - the Great Bear
April: Goodbye to Orion, The Meaning of Magnitude
May: The Sooty Star (R Coronae Borealis), The Earliest British Amateur Astronomer
June: 47 Tucanae, Seeing Stars from the Bottom of a Well
July: The Star in the Indian Bowl (1054 Supernova), The Hunt for Phobus (Russian space probe)
August: The Celestial Harp (Lyra), The Mysterious Nova (Barnard's nova?)
September: The Loveliest Double Star (Albireo), The Baroness and the Supernova (S Andromedae)
October: Transferred Stars (Celestial cartography), The Far Side of the Moon
November: A Most Unusual Solar Eclipse, The Equatorial Sky
December: The Moon Illusion, Zeta Phoenicis

4. A few pages about "Eclipses in 2013", "Occultations in 2013", "Comets in 2013", "Minor Planets in 2013", "Meteors in 2013" and "Some Events in 2014".

5. The "Article Section" that comes in handy when it's cloudy out there! The articles are the following:
ALMA: The World's Most Complex Telescope
The Dawn Asteroid Mission
Digital Meteor Imaging
Will Hay: Entertainer and Amateur Astronomer
The Supernova That Won't Go Away
The Lescarbault Legacy
Touring the Subatomic Universe
Storms on Saturn
Johannes Hevelius (1611-1687): Instrument Maker, Lunar Cartographer and Surveyor of the Heavens

6. A few pages about "Some Interesting Variable Stars", "Mira Stars: Maxima, 2013", "Some Interesting Double Stars", "Some Interesting Nebulae, Clusters and Galaxies" and a list of "Astronomical Societies in the British Isles".

Once again, 5 stars. Although it lacks the eye candy of most modern day "astronomy books", this one has superb content and is written by the best writers on the subject.

UPDATE: It is sad to hear the loss of Britain's greatest amateur astronomer. Thank you Sir for the beautiful voyage through the starry skies of our world...
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 11 December 2012
I have bought a copy of this each year for the past 4 years and I have to say I find it an indispensable companion to my amateur astronomy. This year's book follows the same winning formula as previous editions, with comprehensive charts, relevant guides for the year's events, and interesting articles from respected experts.

RIP Sir Patrick
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The 2013 edition of the always excellent Yearbook of Astronomy contains the usual starcharts for the northern and southern hemispheres, monthly notes, phases of the moon as well as information on minor planets, comets, meteors and other astronomical events for the year ahead. There is also a fine eclectic selection of longer, previously unpublished articles which include, amongst others such topics as; "ALMA: The world's most complex telescope", "The Dawn asteroid mission", "Storms on Saturn" and "Touring the subatomic universe".

One notable omission - its discovery presumably coming too late for inclusion in this publication - is the comet Ison but other than that this seems pretty flawless as usual.

A fitting tribute to the great man, let's hope that all future editions maintain this highest of standards.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 2 January 2013
So pleased we purchased this item - Patrick Moore's last book retains all the qualities of his earlier publications and should be treasured.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 December 2012
Unfortunately Sir Patrick Moore is no longer with us but these books which did come out every year are a must for the amateur astronomer and it will be sad that this is the last book issued whilst Sir Patrick was alive.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 August 2013
As a beginner in astronomy, although this book is a bit technical, I found it very informative and learned a lot from it. It is a very handy month my month guide to what can be seen in the sky.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 February 2013
The late great Sir Patrick Moore has put his name to this volume for many years and I hope it continues. Only available in hardback does make it a little less handy as a reference book. The articles (and there are 9) can be read at any time and are not year dependent. The list of astronomical societies around the country is an invaluable (if sometimes slightly wrong) resource not easily available elsewhere.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 28 March 2013
A great read if you are into astronomy, written on an intellectual level, but sufficient lamen terms used for all to understand
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on 7 March 2014
This was bought as a gift for a friend, a they were very please! I'm not an astronomer myself, so I can't really speak to its reliability or accuracy, or even usefulness, but it looked to me like a great book, with good detail well presented, and was very much enjoyed by the recipient - makes a great gift!
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on 8 May 2013
Its a pity that this will be the last like this to feature Patricks name. I have bought this series of books for a number of years now. It has fuelled my love of astronomy to the point where I have built my own observatory in my garden. I do hope the publishers will keep on producing this very handy guide.
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