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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy of the year?
It is hard to find fault with this novel. All the elegance of 'Across The Nightingale Floor' with the epic spirit of something like 'Princess Mononoke'.

The story is set in an alternate Japan, where a toxic industrial revolution has produced huge technological leaps but dire environmental costs. The 'arashitora', the griffin, is the mouthpiece of the story's...
Published on 25 Aug 2012 by M. Chantal Lyons

versus
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A prime example of the utterly predictable 'good versus evil' plot line
Sometimes, I think there must be something wrong with me. When I sit looking over the myriad - well, 36! - glowing reviews for an over-hyped novel such as Kristoff's 'Stormdancer', I'm left feeling utterly bemused.

Let's start by saying that - surprise! - I didn't enjoy this novel. It is in fact remarkable that it comes across as so intolerably dull, despite...
Published 16 months ago by J. Gardner


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A prime example of the utterly predictable 'good versus evil' plot line, 4 May 2013
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
Sometimes, I think there must be something wrong with me. When I sit looking over the myriad - well, 36! - glowing reviews for an over-hyped novel such as Kristoff's 'Stormdancer', I'm left feeling utterly bemused.

Let's start by saying that - surprise! - I didn't enjoy this novel. It is in fact remarkable that it comes across as so intolerably dull, despite blending feudal Japan with steampunk, mythical beasts, and a tantō-wielding heroine capable of telepathy! That, surely, is a recipe for unbridled success. And yet, no! From the very first chapter onwards, I found 'Stormdancer' to be tedious to the extreme.

For one, it is not very well written. Kristoff labours his prose with great lashes of description, endless paragraphs, which, standing on their own, might come across as well structured and occasionally lyrical, but are instead piled one after another, bogging the story down to such an extent that it takes over 100 pages before we meet the griffon, Buruu, who's character is secondary only to Yukiko herself. From this point on the story does pick up, though it's got to be said that it counts for little, given its prior level of sloth. I honestly think 'Stormdancer' could have done with being around 200 pages long. One needs a really good reason to tell such a limited story in more than that; Kristoff's reason is that he's long winded and indulgent.

And as for characterisation... Urgh, Yukiko is so uninspired. She might have special powers and a thundertiger as companion, but that's about as far as Kristoff goes towards making her interesting, let alone likeable. There has long been a problem with fantasy heroes/heroines being overtly liberal, often laughably unsuited to the medieval-esque societies in which they've supposedly been brought up. Authors often get away with it, and I don't usually mind too much. Yukiko, however, has got to stand as one of the most anachronistic characters I've ever come across. She is clearly of our 21st century world, concerned with climate change and the the lives of those less fortunate. I found this aspect frightfully jarring. If this wasn't enough, she is furthermore simply dull. You can rely on her to do the right thing, and think the right thing. She was for the most part entirely two dimensional. Also, providing Yukiko with a love-interest in the shape of Lord Hiro, seemed quite beyond Kristoff. It's been a while since I've come across such a bungled and unneeded 'romance'.
Other characters are actually slightly better. Buruu himself is very likeable, if out and out nicked from 'How to Train Your Dragon''s Toothless. The best written and most interesting character was Yukiko's father, Masaru. He is wonderfully flawed and I found myself caring for him most of all. Actually, the story told from his perspective would possibly have been superior.

I found the world building itself to be limited. The actual concept is, I think, a great one. Who wouldn't want to read about a steampunky feudal Japan? It's not altogether original, and certainly not to the extent some readers have made it out to be. A lot of it, for instance, is directly lifted from Japanese mythology. (In fact, Kristoff actually seems a little smug on occasion, insisting on having his character 'tell stories' to one another in order to reveal his knowledge of Japanese culture!) As for the rest, it was mostly fairly generic. There's the Empire's capital, and then an obliterated land scarred by the nation's addiction to technology and the 'lotus' fuel on which it runs. All the usual tropes of a steampunk world abound, from gas masks and flying ships, and samurai in clockwork mech suits. It should come across as wonderfully indulgent, and, I admit, there are occasions when it does. But personally I never found enough originality to anything. It was all strangely familiar, with content lifted from countless other sources, particularly anime and manga.

Finally, 'Stormdancer's plot was near enough to non-existent. Most of it is given away in the blurb, and from there it follows the generic fantasy outline of good versus evil that I won't bang on about. I waited and waited for a twist that might surprise me, trusting to reviews that I was going to be left gasping at some point, bowled over by a move I hadn't expected. But no. By the last chapter my cynicism was merely confirmed. 'Stormdancer' is a victim of fantasy's deadliest pitfall; predictability. Kristoff's utter banality wasn't enough to provide the distraction needed to make this novel either interesting or enjoyable. I can count on three fingers the number of occasions when I went, "Huh, that's cool." For the rest of the time I was slogging away, hoping and hoping, but only ever getting increasingly bogged down.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Overhyped and not exactly well-researched, but an interesting read., 26 Feb 2013
By 
Vanessa F "Vanessa" (Somerset, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
Well, if there's one book that has had a hype machine going for it this year, it's Jay Kristoff's Stormdancer. No, not a hype machine. More like a hype combine harvester. I've seen this book being talked about so much over the past year, and naturally, I bought into the hype. It had to be good if so many people were talking about it, right?

Stormdancer tells the story of Yukiko Kitsune, who joins her father on a hunt for a rare beast - an arashitora, which literally translates to 'thunder tiger'. (Basically, a griffin.)

Yukiko and her father take to the skies in an airship, and succeed in capturing the supernatural beastie, but their new cargo uses his powers to cause the ship to crash into the mountains. While there, Yukiko earns the trust of the griffin (which she names Buruu), fights demons, and learns of a conspiracy to take down the shogun.

And that's the story in a nutshell.

Now, I really feel like disclaiming this review with a big old 'it's not you, it's me', or 'this just wasn't my cup of tea'. But that's what I find really strange about this book. How could I not enjoy this? It's got telepathic samurai girls, griffins, demons, Shinto mythology, a dystopian steampunk setting, and it's set in feudal Japan! That alone sets it apart from most of what you see on the YA shelves of any given book shop. I like anime, manga, and all the other typical nerdy Japanese things, I used to practice kendo and karate, and I used to take Japanese after-school classes!

So, I don't quite know why Stormdancer wasn't my particular cup of koucha.

To be fair, Stormdancer does have a lot of good things going for it. This book has some really beautiful prose at points, it's always nice to see a badass action heroine, and I genuinely liked Buruu, the griffin. If you do want a steampunk story with a Japanese setting, you wouldn't go too wrong with Stormdancer. That genre is a very small field, after all.

My main problem with the book was that it was so incredibly... boring. It's not the kind where you feel like the author has taken a vacuum cleaner to any interesting parts of the story, it's just very clunky, and certain parts (the beginning, the time on the airship) drag on forever. Thankfully, they get less clunky as the story goes on, and the story nicely wrapped itself up in the last 30 pages, but still. Damn.

You know the beautiful prose I spoke of precisely two paragraphs ago? That is a plus about this book, but... moderation, folks. Moderation. Sometimes while reading this book, I felt like I was wading through a peat bog. The writing just didn't keep my full attention, and I just longed for simplicity at points.

Another qualm I have with this book is the lack of research. It's not that the author has no idea about Japanese culture, or historical authenticity. We're not looking for that, of course. Stephen King once rightly said that research should be firmly in the back of the story, because nobody wants to read a dissertation on the New York sewer system for the sake of authenticity if your characters have to pass through those murky waters. (Paraphrased from On Writing, Mr. King's excellent memoir.)

However, Kristoff really fell foul of this rule. In the first part of the book, we are subjected to very, very lengthy passages about Shinto mythology. Raijin, Susano-ou, Lady Izanami, Amaterasu, etc. It's nice to see that the author knows the legends and mythology, but I soon dreaded every moment where a character would sit down and pretty much say: "Let me tell you a story..." Telling stories around a fire or holding an impromptu history lesson may seem like a good way to weave exposition into the story from a screenwriting point of view, but it just doesn't work nine times out of ten. Nor does it work when characters bounce these stories back and forth between each other, mostly in the first act of this novel.

Other parts of the research were just... just... argh! Look at the second question in this interview:

"I've had people ask if I did a degree in Japanese studies, but the closest I've come is reading all six volumes of Akira in a week. Maybe I'd picked up a lot of detail through film and manga that I've consumed down through the years, but Wikipedia was really my go-to-guy. I have a friend who lives in Japan who I bounce ideas off too."

Wikipedia - your 'go-to guy'. Let that sink in.

Stormdancer itself seems to take place in this weird pseudo-Japan, called 'Shima'. There are pandas, people seem to use Cantonese expressions of exasperation, and there are parts where characters talk about how a word has x number of syllables - when in Japanese it actually has y amount of syllables - and people bow the way a kung fu practitioner would to their sifu, and there's not much detail paid to the clothing of the period.

Our main heroine Yukiko is put into a juunihitoe at one point - a twelve-layered kimono that only ladies of the court wore. Yukiko also shrugs on a thin kimono at one point. There's no such thing as a thin kimono; a yukata maybe, but not a kimono. People might call an Asian-style robe or a long silky cardigan a 'kimono' in the West, but not in Japan. Kimono are extremely expensive, for one thing, and they normally require assistance to get into, whether it's a full-on ceremonial kimono, or a furisode (worn by unmarried women). But what do you expect when this novel was informed by a glut of anime and Wikipedia research? (There's a reason why university professors scream at their students if they source Wikipedia in their essays!)

The speech patterns were another bugbear for me. People say 'hai' all the time, and it just sounds really weird. There's also the matter of the author's constant use of 'sama' to mean 'sir' or 'milord'. On its own. In Japanese, honorifics are added onto the end of somebody's name, and although there are some honorifics where you don't use somebody's name (i.e., senpai), it's still the general rule. Yukiko would be referred to as, say, 'Kitsune-sama'. Not just 'sama'.

I worry for the potential readership of this book. I knew some of the words here and there (shogun, uwagi, tantou, oni), but everything else I had to Google-fu. Only after finishing this book did I find out that there actually was a glossary. This isn't exactly good for those reading the e-book, like I did. It forces you to jump back and forth all the time, and I can imagine it's very annoying reading the physical copy and having to flip to the glossary every two minutes because you don't know some Japanese word. I imagined reading this as somebody who knew nothing about the Japanese culture or language, and it was very frustrating. Shall I write something in French to illustrate my point? I think I will. Forgive me if it's a little bit rusty.

'Yukiko sensed quelquechose. She knew it must have been le dieu de la guerre, but she couldn't be too certain. Buruu, le griffon who helped her escape from a monstre earlier, cocked his head.

MADEMOISELLE INSECTE COCHON SINGE CHIEN, SHALL WE MAKE CAMP?

Oui, thought Yukiko. I will sleep on it. Le dieu de la guerre will give me une vision de rêve.'

When I read a fantasy novel, I don't mind having a small glossary and/or map. Eragon's glossary was nice and succint, and I only had to look at the map once or twice. With Stormdancer, though, this went way overboard. I just don't see what would have been wrong with writing: 'dagger' in place of 'tantou'. Or 'tunic' in place of 'uwagi'. 'Demon' in place of 'oni'. Looking back, I only know some of these words because I got into obscure anime/J-drama with rather historical settings. Not the kind of thing your average anime fan would know, let alone somebody with no experience in Japanese whatsoever.

In summation, the first act was definitely the most problematic. The world-building and mythology becomes incredibly dense, and I found it really hard to care or connect with any of the characters. The second and third acts are slightly better, but there's a lot of chunky prose to get through, and some stand-out moments which may annoy you if you know a bit about Japanese language/culture/history. The action scenes were always fun to read, and there's plenty of badassery going on (hell, I love the idea of the chain-katana!), and Yukiko and Buruu are two very likeable main characters. It's just a shame this awesome concept fell so short for me. 2.5/5.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy of the year?, 25 Aug 2012
By 
M. Chantal Lyons "C.S. Lyons" (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
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It is hard to find fault with this novel. All the elegance of 'Across The Nightingale Floor' with the epic spirit of something like 'Princess Mononoke'.

The story is set in an alternate Japan, where a toxic industrial revolution has produced huge technological leaps but dire environmental costs. The 'arashitora', the griffin, is the mouthpiece of the story's environmental theme - even paraphrasing a famous Native American saying at one point - but the theme is never overly-polemical nor didactic.

Kristoff's prose is clever and evocative, if occasionally a little too-over describing. His steampunk Japan is highly imaginative, with samurai warriors armoured in robotic suits and wielding chainsaw katanas, and airships filling the sky. Most menacing of all are the Guildsmen, the brains behind the technology, permanently encased in their suits and described as insectoid beings. There are obvious links with Japanese mecha here, but Kristoff has produced a story that transcends such roots.

With all this fascinating invention, one of the main characters - the arashitora - is almost eclipsed. But his character is quite delightful, all his animal mannerisms captured. He reminded me of Toothless from 'How To Train Your Dragon' in more ways than one.

A truly accomplished debut novel, and one that I think and hope will go far. My only problem with it in fact is the front cover - so bland! The blurb gives away the griffin, so why not display it in all its glory on the cover?
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Like your favourite book, but BETTER, 21 Sep 2012
This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
There has been a lot of hype about this book online, and to be honest I wasnt sure if I was going to enjoy it.

I wasnt sure how I would go with the epic fuedal Japanese steampunk-esque setting. Traditionally I'm a fan of gritty fantasy, but in a more traditionally 'medieval' setting (Joe Abercrombie, Scott lynch, Patrick Rothfuss). When I saw that Patrick Rothfuss had given the book the thumbs up, I thought I'd check it out. And I tell you what, it blew my mind.

With strong characters, well crafted storylines, and an epic (though down to earth) storytelling style... Mr Kristoff has totally won me over. I devoured the book in a few sittings, and now crave more. MORE!

I've read a few of the other reviews about this book, so there's enough of a synopsis for you to glean the basic story. All I can say is, give a it a read. An amazing debut novel, from a talented (and somewhat lanky) author.

I love you Jay Kristoff.

In the pants.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Japanese steampunk, 8 July 2013
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A refreshingly different book, good characters, great locations and storyline. Puts a new spin on many scenes and cliches that have been overused in many books.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great myth making, 6 July 2013
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Great start to the Lotus War series, Japanese themed steampunk with wonderful characters set in a polluted, dying land. this environmental disaster has been brought about by the growing of blood lotus, half the population is addicted to smoking lotus, while the rest rely on it as fuel for their factories, vehicles and weapons. Blood lotus is slowly killing the land of Shima as the soil is slowly being poisoned by growing it and nothing else. Masks have to be worn because the air is poisoned by machine exhaust, and the sky is no longer blue. Enter stage one small girl and a mythical thunder tiger, and the adventure begins!
Loved the book, looking forward to reading the second in the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My first dabble in the Japanese Steampunk Genre, 30 April 2013
By 
I. English - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
The book starts off by throwing you into the action, Yukiko is fighting for her life against the Oni, but you have no clue how she got there or why a winged beast is attempting to save her and before you find anything out you are taken back to a few weeks before the fight starts.

For the first quarter of the book you are introduced to the muti-dimensional and flawed characters on-board the Thunder Child, as well as the world that Yukiko lives in. Jay Kristoff has this amazing way of describing things. One of the most memorable scenes to me is when Yukiko is walking through the market to the docks. The description is exquisite. No detail is missed by Kristoff, he uses all of the senses to make you feel like you are actually walking along with Yukiko experiencing the terrible and grand things that she does.

Occasionally the description gets a little repetitive but I think that aspect is needed as you are so fully submerged in this other culture and without the slight repetition you would not know what was going on because there are so many different elements to remember.

This story is more than I was ever expecting, I was expecting a reluctant hunter's daughter to find a thunder tiger and become a Stormdancer, pulling her family from poverty to riches, or something along those lines. But this is so much more. There is love, betrayal, an insane leader and a corrupt, fanatical guild vying for power but neither able to truly control on their own. There is civil unrest, substance abuse, friendships, loss, sex, murder as well as twists and turns all the way through that weave a tail of morality above all.

This book does not pussy foot around important issues as many YA's do. It acknowledges and addresses them head on in a way that say's "these things exist and we can't ignore them or pretend that good people don't have flaws." Which is what I love most about all these characters, they are all flawed. No one is perfect but they try to be as good as they can in the terrible situations they are in.

I don't know if you can tell but I'm trying to write this review without spoiling it because there is so much that you just need to read for yourself to fully appreciate it so my review isn't talking about any of the specific elements I loved. I am reviewing the book as a whole and being very general because I honestly think you need to go out and read this book, if for nothing else read it for Yukiko who is one of the best female protagonists I have read in a long time. She is strong but at times naively unaware. The relationships she forms with people and creatures feel very organic and even though this book is not from her point of view Jay Kristoff captured her personality and voice so perfectly I can still hear her in my head.

One problem I had with the book is that I'm terrible with names, and a lot of characters are given multiple names in this book which sometimes mean I wasn't sure who I was reading about but I usually figured it out after a little bit.

OK, so wow. For a really general review this is really frigging long but I just loved it. In just one book Kristoff, the literal literary giant, has created a brilliantly thought out world with a cast of three-dimensional characters. The way it ended was perfect; I loved how he didn't take 3 or 4 books to tackle a problem. It was dealt with and I can't wait to see how the world continues to develop and tackle its issues in the next two books. I hope they live up to the high bar Jay has set himself. THIS IS A MUST READ!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An epic quest in steampunk feudal Japan - what's not to like?, 18 April 2013
By 
Dinah85 "Dinah93" (Cleveland,UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
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While the writing is nothing particularly special, this book is none the less enthralling, largely due to the unique crossover of Feudal Japan and Steampunk of the world in which the story is set. As a fan of the genre even I am starting to find that the basic concept of "Lord has dream of glory and sends hero on quest to acquire necessary item" has somewhat been done to death. However I found that the Steampunk element certainly lends a freshness to the concept I have not experienced in some time.

As I stated above the story revolves around the reluctant and relatively unknown hero being dragged off on a quest to find an item. The author is excellent at setting the scene, it is easy to see the "stage" but following the actors on the stage can be difficult at times, particularly during combat scenes. To me this is a big issue when writing in feudal Japan. Combat in this genre should be fast paced, not the broad sword and plate armor of medieval Europe, but for it to work you need to be able to see the sword deflecting this strike or that kick hitting home and blasting the opponent across the room. Feudal Japanese stories don't work if the fight scenes don't work and it is here, and here alone, that the writing really fails for me, which is unfortunate as it hurts what is otherwise a fantastic concept and story.

There is what could be seen as a veiled commentary relating to the world today running through the book. Most notable is the theme of environmentalism running from the Lotus Guild and their toxic fuel polluting the world to the point that everyone has to wear breathing masks (if they can afford them) or otherwise cover their faces, and talk of extinct creatures. The Rich/Poor divide is clearly hit upon with the Shogun displaying his wealth and living in opulence while the concept of a family pet is long since a thing of the past for common folk.

This is not a book to read late at night, unfortunately the text in the book is somewhat smaller than I would expect and I (at the ripe old age of 26 with near perfect eye sight) need quite a bit of light to read it, a lot more than a book light provides.

Would I read it again? Absolutely. Am I looking forward to the next one? Nearly as much as I am to the next Game of Thrones or I was to the last Wheel of Time book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars not a masterpiece, 23 Dec 2012
By 
Mr. K. H. Cobb (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
The initial premise is interesting - a Japanese style world becoming increasingly polluted by the growth and combustion of lotus flowers, which provides the energy requirements for the various machines, but throws out clouds of black and toxic smoke - but it somehow never quite grips the imagination. Mine, anyway. It's basically Good (those who oppose the rule of the Shogun and the forces he controls) against Evil (the Shogun and his various mates and forces) and though a few of the good get killed, sometimes gorily, there never seems any doubt that the heroine and her flying tiger will come out on top in the end. It's readable enough, but there's little depth to the characters and little deviation from the basically simple plot line. If you came across this in a library, it would be in the children's rather than the adult section. I found it a bit disappointing, and I doubt I'll want to read any future volumes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant., 9 Dec 2012
By 
Beanie Luck Spud (Cotswolds) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) (Hardcover)
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The first in an epic new fantasy series, introducing an unforgettable new heroine

A DYING LAND
The Shima Imperium verges on the brink of environmental collapse; an island nation once rich in tradition and myth, now decimated by clockwork industrialization and the machine-worshipers of the Lotus Guild. The skies are red as blood, the land is choked with toxic pollution, and the great spirit animals that once roamed its wilds have departed forever.

AN IMPOSSIBLE QUEST
The hunters of Shima's imperial court are charged by their Shogun to capture a thunder tiger - a legendary creature, half-eagle, half-tiger. But any fool knows the beasts have been extinct for more than a century, and the price of failing the Shogun is death.

A HIDDEN GIFT
Yukiko is a child of the Fox clan, possessed of a talent that if discovered, would see her executed by the Lotus Guild. Accompanying her father on the Shogun's hunt, she finds herself stranded: a young woman alone in Shima's last wilderness, with only a furious, crippled thunder tiger for company. Even though she can hear his thoughts, even though she saved his life, all she knows for certain is he'd rather see her dead than help her.

But together, the pair will form an indomitable friendship, and rise to challenge the might of an empire.

Stormdancer takes place on the islands of Shima, much like Japan in feudal times but have mechanical technology (clockwork) and flying machines. The earth is dying because of Blood Lotus which has many uses: fuel, drugs, poison, etc, but this flower is killing the fertile land, polluting the air and water. Stormdancer's world is a little weird because the steampunk breathing masks and goggles, the iron samurais with chainsaw katanas, the sky-ships.

The islands are governed by the Shogun (commander or dictator) who rules his people with an iron fist and he commands the capture of the thunder tiger a mythological creature believed to be extinct. Yukiko a 16 year-old girl is with the group of hunters who are entrusted with this task, she's strong and very good to fighting with her tanto, and by a twist of fate she ends up "stuck" in the same place as the thunder tiger, an animal that sees humans as insects and would happily kill her, but they end up creating a very strong bond of friendship.

While Yukiko and Buruu most definitely have the most interesting relationship in this novel, the most heart-warming one is that between Yukiko and her father, Masaru. I loved the manner in which this relationship evolved - it was complex, confusing, heart-breaking, yet truly impactful. I could feel all the conflicted emotions Yukiko felt towards her father in my own gut and felt such a strong pull towards the relationship between these two, perhaps because we all have fathers ourselves. Even Yukiko's changing relationships with Masaru's tracking friends, one of whom happens to be the woman he slept with while Yukiko's mother was still alive, were very realistically written and developed. I also felt a strong bond towards Yukiko's dead twin brother and I admired how wonderfully Yukiko herself had been shaped surrounding this grief. While she is initially a tough character to like, her relationships with others and her rocky past makes her a flawed character, but an understandable, relatable, lovable, and admirable one as well.

The story is filled with Japanese words, which might cause distress for some readers, because there are a lot of them.
However readers who are looking for an "easy" read, should in fact stick with it and those who won't take the time to savor a book that is actually beautifully written and slowly developed will in fact miss out on one of the best books i have read in a while.

There is action aplenty in Stormdancer, but in order to get there you must journey through some lush and careful world-building first.

Good things come to those who wait, or in this case, to those who keep reading. Kristoff saves some of his best surprises for the end of the book, including details on how the blood lotus got its name. Stormdancer is the first in the Lotus War Trilogy, and I can't wait to read what's next for Yukiko and Buruu.
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Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1)
Stormdancer: The Lotus War: Book One (Lotus War 1) by Jay Kristoff (Hardcover - 13 Sep 2012)
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