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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars He's a rolling stone
As Ronnie Wood says himself, he is the "new boy" of the Rolling Stones -- meaning he's only been a member for more than thirty years.

But he certainly isn't lacking interesting stories. In fact, "Ronnie: The Autobiography" is crammed with good-natured recountings of the wild world of rock'n'roll's golden age. Wood has a mellow, nostalgic style, loaded down with...
Published on 13 Jan. 2008 by EA Solinas

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars As long as I'm happy
Ronnie Wood has the reputation for being rock's Mr Nice Guy. A moderately talented musician (and pretty reasonable artist) who has gone a long way by fitting in with the great and the good. Indeed he has done this for so long that he has joined the pantheon of rock legends himself. The good bits of the book are those where Ronnie narrates what it was like to be in at...
Published on 7 Jun. 2009 by Adrenalin Streams


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars As long as I'm happy, 7 Jun. 2009
This review is from: Ronnie (Paperback)
Ronnie Wood has the reputation for being rock's Mr Nice Guy. A moderately talented musician (and pretty reasonable artist) who has gone a long way by fitting in with the great and the good. Indeed he has done this for so long that he has joined the pantheon of rock legends himself. The good bits of the book are those where Ronnie narrates what it was like to be in at the start of the British rock 'n roll boom of the 60's, the excitement tempered by the grind of constant touring with very little money, only relieved by the excesses of youth. I also like hearing about his art career. From the content side, what is missing for me is detail about the creative side of the Stones, and how Ronnie came to write songs that made it on albums, or didn't - the details about the Stones are no more revealing than available in most other books written by outsiders. However, my biggest downer is nothing to do with the book's structure but relates to Ronnie himself. My long held view of Ronnie the nice guy was exploded completely by this book. The levels of selfishness he displays to family and friends is staggering - over four decades it seems to be a case of "as long as I'm happy then that's all that matters". In some ways Ronnie is quite brave to let us see him warts and all, but I'm not convinced he intended to paint such an unflattering portrait of himself.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars He's a rolling stone, 13 Jan. 2008
By 
EA Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Ronnie: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
As Ronnie Wood says himself, he is the "new boy" of the Rolling Stones -- meaning he's only been a member for more than thirty years.

But he certainly isn't lacking interesting stories. In fact, "Ronnie: The Autobiography" is crammed with good-natured recountings of the wild world of rock'n'roll's golden age. Wood has a mellow, nostalgic style, loaded down with plenty of humour and artwork.

Wood was born to a quirky family of water gypsies, won attention as a child for his artwork, and when he was grown, immersed himself in the rising tide of rock'n'roll. He performed with Rod Stewart, Eric Clapton, and nearly became part of Led Zeppelin -- and after the Faces broke up, he was asked to join the Rolling Stones as a replacement for Mick Taylor.

And that was only the beginning -- Wood became part of a tight-knit, well-oiled machine of friends and colleagues, who were soaked in drugs, sex and classic rock'n'roll. He recounts weddings, funerals, divorce, births, drug arrests in Arkansas, exploding septic tanks, cocaine, Monty Python, and lots and lots of music-making...

Reading "Ronnie: the Authobiography" is a little like sitting down with a grizzled rock veteran, having a beer, and listening to him reminisce about his wilder days. Wood seems to have had a relatively stable life compared to his bandmates Jaggger and Richards, but by no means a boring one -- it gets more interesting as soon as he joins up.

As well as art and music, Wood has a knack for words -- he has a pleasant, conversational style, and he puts in all kinds of shriekingly funny stories (and unnerving ones, like Keith chasing him with a knife) in an arch, deadpan manner. He doesn't make excuses for any bad behavior, but just owns up to it and relates it in the most amusing way possible.

What's even more striking about him is that he hasn't really got a bad word to say about anyone. He praises most of the people in this book, but if someone is nasty (like his ex-wife berating him after she drove into a storefront) he simply lets it pass. And he's perfectly willing to make fun of himself, such as smoking meringues and asking Kylie Minogue if she needed to find her parents.

And there are a LOT of people in this book -- Beatles, Stones, Clapton, the guys of Monty Python ("My mum wants you to go!"), Rod Stewart, Jimi Hendrix, John Belushi, and countless others. Not to mention some homage shout-outs to the greats of blues -- Muddy Waters makes an appearance, only to mistake Ronnie for Keith.

Oh, and the book is sprinkled with artwork by Wood -- very good ones too, with a sort of fragmented sensual quality. Even if, say, it's of Keith passed out.

"Ronnie: The Autobiography" is a warm, nostalgic book of a very crazy time in rock history, with plenty of stories that fans will eat up. A great read for rock'n'roll fans.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's only Rock and Roll but I like it., 29 Jan. 2008
This review is from: Ronnie: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
Ronnie Woods, a member of one of the worlds greatest bands, reveals his life story so far. From his gypsy start, to the bands he's played in and his time as an artist. This autobiography is great. I could not put it down once I started reading it. The book is a wonderful read and you can't help but to tell the nearest person some of the stories Ronnie is telling you as you read it. There are many laughs throughout this book, as well as shocks, and by the end of it you'll be wanting to buy yourself a guitar so you can start your own band. Fantastic book.
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37 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A moving, hilarious, detailed journey of one of rock's legends., 24 Oct. 2007
This review is from: Ronnie: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
An incredible story, Ronnie was much more than I expected. 60 years old and still rockin', this man has done it all. From a small house in london to the world's biggest stages, Ronnie has had an hilarious, moving, dangerously exciting six decades and this highly readable memoir will stay with you for a long while. The book rolls you through the ups and downs of his life, his 'relationship' with girls, booze and drugs, his love for music and art and his travels with Rod, Kieth, Mick and the rest of rocks unmentionables.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book of two halves, 1 Aug. 2009
By 
J. Bodicoat "Digger" (Manchester) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ronnie: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
Received this as a Chrissy present and got started on it straight away. Having been brought up with the music of the 60's I found Ronnie's stories amusing and wasn't surprised at the names that he frequently dropped. There were some great stories and characters around at that time. For me the book starts to wane after he joined the Stones and the drugs and booze kicked in. To keep admitting that you can't remember albums, recording sessions, etc and laughing off or glorifying the drug taking depressed me. Amazing that he continues to remember the names though! I couldn't wait to get through the last half of the book but for the wrong reasons, and it never got any better. Someone mentions selfishness in another review, I can see that and of course current events prove it even further. What a crying shame.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I want to believe..., 14 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Ronnie (Paperback)
I found this book really entertaining and interesting: Ron Wood's tales are a lot and you never get bored while reading his autobiography.

Nevertheless, every story sounds amazing as long as it's true, fantasy has no room into a biography. It shouldn't.
So, when I got to a precise point though the book, I felt some reasonable doubts about what I was listening to...

What is really impressive to me is the number of famous musicians and, in general, celebrities that Ron happens to have run into, from Jimi Hendrix to Clapton, Muhammad Ali, George Harrison, Elvis and just anyone you may name: Ron has jammed, partied or made friends with all of them (except he apparently never met Hitler, Jesus and Cleopatra).
After all he's a member of The Rolling Stones, one of the most famous rock bands on earth, and it's very likely he's got this kind of opportunities all the time.

I want to believe him, I want to believe it all... but when I read that one day Peter Grant (the legendary Led Zeppelin's manager, for the few that don't know his name) gave him a call claiming that Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham wanted him to be the guitarist for the "New Yardbirds" and, having Ronnie Wood turned him down twice, "they hired Jimmy Page instead"... come on man! What are you talking about??
The problem is that he apparently wasn't joking at all, and this got me a little concerned about the rest I read until the last page being genuine. Let's say that at this particular point I was seriously considering to put the book down. Forever.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good in parts, 22 Dec. 2014
This review is from: Ronnie (Paperback)
The best parts of this book are the early chapters, before Ronnie Wood achieved fame. Following this, the content is a bit threadbare. I am disappointed that there is not more about the Faces who were a major band in the early 70s. Moreover, they are the only band in which Ronnie Wood was a creative force of any significance. It is no coincidence that in partnership with Ronnie Wood, in the late ate 60s and early 70s, Rod Stewart was at his absolute zenith and became a super star. The book does not shed any new light on the two reasons for the break up of the Faces, Rod’s solo success and the allure of the Rolling Stones for Ronnie, following Mick Taylor’s departure. It is notable that Ronnie does state that he always believed he was destined for the Stones.

Unlike Brian Jones and Mick Taylor, Ronnie Wood has always been happy with what is a secondary role in the Jagger/Richards controlled Stones. By his own admission, he was only granted song writing credits when the Glimmer Twins were at loggerheads in the 80s. The books content on the Stones does appear to be very “safe” and one does suspect that the manuscript had to meet with the approval of Mick Jagger.

The book contains inaccuracies which will be evident to anyone with even a rudimentary knowledge of the musical landscape. What is most remarkable is Ronnie Wood’s statement that he was the original choice as Led Zeppelin’s guitarist! Did not Jimmy Page form Led Zeppelin to replace the Yardbirds and fulfil touring commitments. It is fact that Ronnie Wood was appointed by Jimmy Page’s Yardbirds predecessor, Jeff Beck, to play bass when he set up his own band (Rod Stewart vocals and the beginning of the partnership). The book is seriously lacking in information on this crucial time in the late 60s which would have been of great interest. What is evident is that there was a serious divide between Ronnie Wood and Yardbirds /Led Zep manager Peter Grant but we are not enlightened. Is his assertion that he turned down Led Zeppelin delusion, or is he having a laugh? I am fairly certain it is the latter and the laughs continue to this day, judging by his recent rock credibility deflating appearance on the X Factor with One Direction!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing tabloid fodder., 11 Nov. 2009
This review is from: Ronnie (Paperback)
I was looking forward to reading this book because I like the image of Ronnie Wood - hard drinking, womanising rock star with a soft centre and a second career as an above average artist. Sadly "Ronnie" did not live up to the promise. Ronnie Wood has had a very interesting life, in his imagination anyway. Large parts of this book are hard to believe, and I got the sense that he was writing what people wanted to have happened rather than what actually did.

Sexual indiscretions are recounted ad nauseam (Ronnie doesn't kiss and tell, he shouts it from the rooftops), and the constant name-dropping becomes depressingly tedious. His best friends include other musicians (as one would expect), artists and painters, sportsmen and women (he apparently played tennis with John McEnroe), politicians and of course their wives.

"Ronnie" is not a book that I would recommend, and it strengthens my belief that it is better to stick to biographies rather than autobiographies when dealing with people with huge egos. I gave it one star because of its sheer audacity. Oh, and he finishes off by suggesting his next literary venture might be a work of fiction - you've already done it Ron!
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3.0 out of 5 stars An Entertaining Read, 28 Dec. 2010
By 
Anthony R. Dixon (Malvern, Worcs Great Britain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ronnie: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
Not the best-written autobiography by a long chalk, but certainly an entertaining read, with a liberal sprinkling of Rock'n'Roll anecdotes, though some of them leave you asking "is that it? Is that your story?". As other reviewers have noticed, there is a fair bit of name dropping, but let's face it, Ronnie is a name, has been in the music business a long time, and knows and has worked with the biggest in the business, so it's pretty much to be expected. It's also pretty much what people expect to read. As others have remarked, some more depth wouldn't go amiss.

Not sure I believe the bit about Ronnie being the first-choice guitarist for the New Yardbirds (The future Led Zeppelin), as it's pretty common knowledge that Jimmy Page that was left holding The Yardbirds name and legacy; but given the copious amounts of substances he has polished off, I can forgive Ronnie this little bout of amnesia.

I like his childhood reminiscences of life in Yiewsley & West Drayton. As a native of the town myself, I can identify with being left outside the pub with a coke and a bag of crisps while his father was inside getting tanked. I lived on The Whitethorn Avenue estate for five years and men still do collapse into people's front gardens on the way home from The Nag's, a pub of no small local notoriety.

There are people out there, and in The Stones, who are invulnerable to the long-term effects of drugs and booze, but Ronnie clearly isn't one of them. He should give both a wide berth. Ronnie comes across as a nice, amiable guy, but definitely not the sharpest tool in the box. Oh Ronnie, please put any money you earn in a savings account and live off the interest, because you're a bad businessman and a shakedown artist's dream?

If you've only got money for one Rolling Stone autobiography, buy Keef's Life, it's a much more rewarding read.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ronnie Be Good, 25 Oct. 2007
By 
K. Amachree - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ronnie: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
I couldn't put this book down . Ronnie is a great story teller , but always being himself, so you feel you are reading a friend's book . Sometimes he leaves one with an open mouth , and saying how did he survive and did he really do that! I liked Ronnie Wood before reading this book now I love the guy . He's a real human being that has has brought some great music , laughter, and life into so many lives . Nice one Ronnie I look forward to Ronnie part two .
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Ronnie: The Autobiography
Ronnie: The Autobiography by Ronnie Wood (Hardcover - 12 Oct. 2007)
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