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on 19 February 1999
I had to read this book for an English class and I've read it several times since of my own accord. Full of brilliant symbolism, this book employs some fascinating literary techniques. Laurence's use of Morag's "memorybank movies" is so realistic that you really feel as you read that you are growing up with her. Her discovery of herself and acceptance of her flawed loved ones, such as her adoptive parents and her off-and-on lover Jules, is one of the best aspects of the book. Her realization that not only can she deal with but she is also proud of where she comes from is something I love to read about each time. It's a great book to study carefully, after you've read it once. If you just skim the surface, you miss so much. Great regional flavor.
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on 28 March 1999
My last year of highschool we had to read The Stone Angel, and it was the only book assigned to me in highschool that I managed to finish ahead of sechduel. I have since been out of school for two years and when I found The Diviners I jumped at the chance to read it. And I loved it and everything about it, unlike the other reveiwers I was neither forced to read it nor was I looking for a book about a middle aged women to relate to. I read this book simply because Laurence is a great storyteller. She manages to wave the past and present flawlessly never losing the reader anywhere in between. I fond that the realisionship between Morag and Pique was much like the realisionship between Deliah and Cissy in Dorthy Alison's Cavedweller. So if you like The Cavedweller then you like this book. The same can be said for if you like Laurence's books you will Alison's books because she is the next step for Women's litature in North America!
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on 16 March 1998
This book captures it all: the tension between French Canada and English Canada, between the town and the city, between aboriginal and immigrant; Lawrence's work captures the ambiguousness that is Canada. This is also very much a book about women, and women's stuggles in Canada in the twentieth century. Very rich, full of detail, with vibrant characters, Lawrence's masterpiece is a pleasure to read again and again. It was (in my opinion) wrongfully banded from classrooms in Canada when it was published, and, unfortunately, remains largely unread by Canadian students. Note: telefilm Canada has produced a wonderful film version of this novel.
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on 18 October 1998
I never had to read this for any kind of course and so i read it for pleasure and i am really pleased i did. One of the most powerful, emotion packed books, i have read. A book about human nature that is more real than the computer screen you are staring at. Thoroughly reccommended.
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on 29 November 2009
This book is the single most important novel in the world to me. I discovered it at a crucial point in my growing up, and it has helped shape both my thinking and my writing. I lent my copy years ago and never got it back -- but for a long time it didn't matter, because I knew so much of it off by heart! Now I am delighted to have my own copy again.

This novel is not just important to me, though. Nor is it merely important because of the furore it originally caused, getting banned from many high school libraries! It is important because it is adventurous, masterful and perceptive writing. The "stream-of-concsciousness" bits of it echo the way people really think more accurately than anything else I have ever read. The structure is experimental yet, again, echoes the way people's memories really work. Nothing is done just for effect.

In addition, many readers will find within its pages a hard-hitting yet sympathetic treatment of themes that may be close to their own hearts: the search for identity among emigrants, the divides in our society (between women and men, poor and middle-class, native and non-native...), the ultimate truth that we can only ever seek our own truth. Margaret Laurence is, with Robertson Davies, in my opinion one of the two greatest Canadian novelists of the 20th Century.
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on 15 August 1996
'The Diviners' is not a book reserved for Literature courses. It is, simply put, a statement about life and journeys, and identity by the way-side. It is about taking the courage to be true to yourself, even if 'yourself' isn't exactly the most popular person in the world! The rebels, the drop-outs, the outsiders of the world are in fact out unsung heroines. Join Morag and Pique as they travel along the river of time, moving backward and forward between childhood and womanhood.
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on 12 July 1998
After viewing a film, "Taking Liberties", I decided to read THE DIVINERS because part of the story line involved it being banned from a high school English class. I cannot imagine why anyone would suggest this novel to a high school English class and I am a high school English teacher. The novel centers on a woman in her 40s and I believe that you need to be a mature reader to appreciate this novel. It is marvelous! I highly recommend it (read the other positive reviews for details). But reading reviews of THE DIVINERS and other novels by Laurence here at Amazon leads me to believe that many young Canadians are being turned off by Laurence because they are not ready for the themes and even the subjects of her novels. Some works need to be read later on in life.
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on 15 June 1999
I can't expect I can find such a humorous novel in Canadian culture. The idioms and slangs that Laurence has picked are BRAVOS! Don't be afraid of the thickness of the book. Once you have read a several pages, you will deeply immerse into Morag's life.
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on 6 May 1997
Sad, Compleing and a sweet image that linger in ones mind.
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on 17 July 1998
WE had to read this book for summer school here in Peel. At first, we were all over-whelmed by the thickness of the book; but personally, when I got into it, it was rather enjoyable. Only the description of sexuality in there didn't seem that necessary to me. It is an overall interesting book, and is not a hard-read at all.
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