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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thomas Kuhn's revolutionary theory on scientific change.
Thomas Kuhn's controversial 1962 book produced a radical change in the way of thinking about science and also introduced the now pervasive term 'paradigm shift'.
Before Kuhn, the orthodox view was that science progressed in an evolutionary, cumulative way, gradually getting nearer to the 'truth'. In a nutshell, Kuhn's thesis states that there are alternating periods...
Published on 21 Aug. 2012 by Jazzrook

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3.0 out of 5 stars Hanson's early death removed a brilliant mind who might have developed a truly universal philosophy ...
Kuhn restates and enlarges on the ideas first put forward by N R Hanson, in Patterns of Discovery, published four years earlier. Kuhn shows himself to have digested Hanson's ideas well, but it is arguable to what extent he really improved on them. Hanson's early death removed a brilliant mind who might have developed a truly universal philosophy of science, instead of the...
Published 6 months ago by Enthusiast


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thomas Kuhn's revolutionary theory on scientific change., 21 Aug. 2012
By 
Jazzrook - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Thomas Kuhn's controversial 1962 book produced a radical change in the way of thinking about science and also introduced the now pervasive term 'paradigm shift'.
Before Kuhn, the orthodox view was that science progressed in an evolutionary, cumulative way, gradually getting nearer to the 'truth'. In a nutshell, Kuhn's thesis states that there are alternating periods of 'normal' and 'revolutionary' science. After a revolutionary paradigm shift normal science is resumed with a new theoretical framework. Examples of this shift are the transition from Ptolemy's earth-centred solar system to the Copernican sun-centred paradigm and Newtonian mechanics being superseded by quantum mechanics.
'The Structure of Scientific Revolutions', which has now sold 1.4 million copies, is one of the most influential books of the 20th century and this 50th Anniversary Edition has an excellent new preface by philosopher Ian Hacking.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars classic, 15 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Beautifully written. There's a tendency to over-egg the case, and perhaps Kuhn should say more about the extent to which relevant scientists saw themselves as engaging in revolutionary change. But a great account of the struggle for understanding in the field of science; even non-scientists ought to find it gripping. Helpful introduction to this edition by Ian Hacking.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book and edition, 25 Jun. 2012
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
the book is a classic, the introductory notes for anniversary edition are insightful and helpful for someone interested but not expert in the problems treated.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Hanson's early death removed a brilliant mind who might have developed a truly universal philosophy ..., 2 Sept. 2014
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Kuhn restates and enlarges on the ideas first put forward by N R Hanson, in Patterns of Discovery, published four years earlier. Kuhn shows himself to have digested Hanson's ideas well, but it is arguable to what extent he really improved on them. Hanson's early death removed a brilliant mind who might have developed a truly universal philosophy of science, instead of the incompatible "schools" founded by Popper, Kuhn, Feyerabend and all the rest of them. It is ironic that Hanson is nowadays nearly forgotten, and that the kudos of his ideas accrues to Kuhn, whose acknowledgement of his debt to Hanson was, let us say, muted.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still an excellent reference, 28 May 2014
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Although many of the examples which explain how social sciences work today are outdated, it is still an excellent reference for philosophers of science and interested people to understand how scientific revolutions work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 8 Dec. 2014
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Slightly outdated but nevertheless a MUST read
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the original of the origin, 16 May 2014
This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
The basic of the basic for sciense understanding. One hve to read it all the way down to become a scientist
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Flawed Grand Theory, 16 April 2013
By 
Dr Barry Clayton (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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There are several 'Grand Theories', for example those of Hegel, Spengler, Toynbee and Marx. All have been shown to be wanting. Marx,an excellent social thinker, was a complete failure as predictor of the future.
Likewise, Kuhn's theory of scientific development has made an important contribution to the history of science despite it being flawed.

He asserts that scientific theories can never be true descriptions of reality. He argues that 'normal science' always leads to anomalies (problems)that cannot be solved through the framework of the paradigm (a scientific achievement that includes laws, theory, application and instrumentation together). As a result, problems become after a while countercases; the old paradigm is no longer of use. A crisis results which results in a scientific revolution that in turn leads to a new paradigm that can be used to solve the new problems. A new period of 'normal science' is then set in train. According to Kuhn this process constitutes scientific development. In brief,it constitutes a universal model.

There are a number of things wrong with the theory. Firstly, if he is right then it follows that no scientific theory can ever be true because if it were true then no anomalies would emerge. Without these there could be no crises and no new paradigms. There is little wonder that few scientists hold his theory in high esteem.
Secondly, Kuhn says there is no progress in science, an astonishing assertion. Is our knowledge of the atom no better than 100 years ago, is our medical knowledge no better than, say 50 years ago? Science does progress.

Thirdly, his theory is modeled on Darwin's evolutionary theories. Many have demonstrated that the analogy is false.

As a result of these flaws his theory today is far more warmly welcomed in the humanities than among scientists. In International Relations and Sociology, for example, his theory has found a friendly home over the years.

Kuhn's theory has made important contributions to the history of science but as a general theory it is untenable just as those non scientists' theories mentioned above are untenable.

Do read what was a ground-breaking book in its day but be aware of its inherent flaws.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, 26 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
excellent -very satisfied with your product and service, thanks very much indeed.I will purchase again and will certainly recommend you.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, 13 Feb. 2013
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This review is from: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition (Paperback)
Very good product, arrived in time, in perfect conditions.
If you wanna know about the essence of science, buy this fantastic book.
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