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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars163
4.0 out of 5 stars
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on 12 October 2002
Having run out of books on holiday i picked up my father's copy of 'French Revolutions'. I expected any book my dad owned to be heavily detailed on group sets and bottom brackets, and of little intest to the casual cyclist. How wrong was I. You don't need to know anything about the tour, the book is laugh out loud funny, unputdownable. The acheivement of any man who can ride this incredable race is hammered home, there is no sporting acheivement on earth like this one. However what really makes the book good is the way it draws in the reader, everyone's had the 5year old in the park experience of riding, but few can express it as hilariously as Tim Moore. The book is packed with dry humour and an author people can relate to, 'French Revolutions' has to be in my top ten of books. Go out - Buy it!
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on 2 July 2004
Anyone who has ever suffered cycling up-hill or endured the Gallic shrug will love this book. Moore puts his own heroic tour of France in the context of the actual event, earning admiration for him as well as the pros.
He writes in an engaging and self-deprecating style which can not fail to raise a smile. As the story of his tour unfolds, alternating in agony and ecstasy, the author slips in lots of practical information on everything from sterilizing bidons to sending back bad pizzas.
For me, this book has everything.
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on 15 July 2001
I read 'Continental Drifter' and thought the central idea was silly, even though the author is obviously talented. I just asked myself why bother with such a silly idea for an entire book? This is different altogether - a very funny but quite serious book, along the lines of 'A walk in the woods' by Bill Bryson. Both men (almost middle-aged) start out trying to be funny about their respective athletic activities but gradually you (and they) realise how much they enjoy them, and how deeply they start to seep into their identities. I really liked this book.
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on 5 July 2014
I wasn't sure what to expect from this book, I'd not heard of the author previously and it could've been a scientific tome. Instead it proved to be a narrative from a true pro road racing fan who had not tried to emulate his heroes until his mid-30s. There was some all-opening detail of how things used to be in pro cycling. I wasn't sure when the book was set (2000) until a little way in to the read - there are some sections that show there age (references to the French Franc, a heroic Armstrong) but these take nothing away from the story of Moore's ride.
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on 10 June 2002
I was attracted to this book by the cover only, but having started to read it, I found that I couldn't put it down! A delightful insight into one man's struggle with himself his bike and the French. Excellent, and very funny!
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on 15 July 2014
Bought this for my dad who used to love riding his bike but at 91 tends to limit himself to reading books and watching the Tour de France on television. He loved the book and said it made him laugh out loud several times. I have bought him two other Tim Moore books so hope they are all as enjoyable as this one!
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on 29 August 2001
Not only is this book extremely entertaining, but also surprisingly informative for anybody interested in the history of the Tour de France or cycle touring. As a cyclist I could relate to many of his experiences, often making his experiences even more hilarious. Above all, I found it extremely refreshing to read a book about cycling, written by someone who did something genuinely inspiring, yet isn't a professional, but actually a pretty average cyclist.
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on 17 February 2007
I have been lucky enough to follow a few Tours in my life usually on my own and on a motorbike with very little luggage and this book reminds me of the emotions I went through on those journeys. There was none of the pain obviously, but the scenery and constant weather watching brings it all back. The villages he describes come alive for one day in the year just because this amazing event is passing through. Until you've been up Ventoux, it's hard to imagine how anyone could cycle up it after being in the saddle all day but the author's references to the late Tom Simpson was also poignant reminding us of how he died 40 years ago on that mountain. This book is funny, descriptive and a great read for anyone who is in awe of cycling as I am and for someone who has never really ridden a bike before, I think he did rather well. Who cares if he cheated? All he did was face the stark realisation that the men who compete in the Tour de France are totally dedicated sportsmen with a passion most of us will never know.
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on 19 October 2001
Tim Moore doesn't just cycle himself around the route of the 2000 Tour de France, he takes us with him strapped to his paniers. This book will have the tears rolling down your cheeks with laughter, but it's touching too, and inspirational for all those bored with sitting on their backside behind a computer. Funnier than Bill Bryson...
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on 22 May 2003
Moore's dry and consistently self-deprecating humour gives a new perspective on both the folly and grandeur of the Tour de France, making this a very human account of one of the most inhuman challenges in world sport. For lovers of the Tour there are plenty of historical anecdotes thatshow the many faces of the Tour over the years. Admittedly, residents of some of the many villes d'etape that he passes through, and in particular hoteliers and restauranteurs, may be less than flattered with the light that they are cast in, but then ultimately it is Moore himself who comes in for the harshest treatment, this account giving a brutally honest, and hilarious appraisal of the cheating and failures (both endemic in the Tour past and present) that counterpoint the many successes and achievements on the road to the Champs Elysees and to becoming a 'Giant of the Road'.
Like all great travel books, and this IS a great travel book, the reader is drawn along and into this epic and foolhardy adventure by the easy narrative which flows almost as easily as the liquid refreshment that accompanies the cycling.
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