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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant! The Best Tour ever.
Absolutely brilliant retelling of the events surrounding the 1986 Tour de France by Richard Moore. This was the first Tour broadcast on British TV by Channel 4 and as it was also my first Tour it brought back many many great memories.

Moore tries to unravel the events surrounding Lemond's victory and whether or not his team mate, Hinault (the badger) was riding...
Published on 15 Jun 2011 by Joman73

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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A different opinion
Richard Moore's Slaying the Badger seems to have gained universal praise and so it's with some trepidation that I offer a dissenting opinion. Don't get me wrong: the story of the 1986 Tour is a fascinating one. I'm just not sure that this book tells it in a fascinating way.

I should probably make clear at the outset that I work as a writer and editor. That...
Published on 21 July 2011 by readie


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant! The Best Tour ever., 15 Jun 2011
Absolutely brilliant retelling of the events surrounding the 1986 Tour de France by Richard Moore. This was the first Tour broadcast on British TV by Channel 4 and as it was also my first Tour it brought back many many great memories.

Moore tries to unravel the events surrounding Lemond's victory and whether or not his team mate, Hinault (the badger) was riding against him to gain victory for himself and win an unprecedented sixth victory. Claim and counter claim from our two protagonists ensure that the `truth' will never be known, however, by interviewing many of the major players of the 1986 Tour, Moore manages to add further intrigue and controversy to an already legendary tale.

Both Lemond and Hinault are brilliant characters (Hinault is simply a mad Frenchman - check out when he was driving and texting) and I found it difficult to take sides. As a result, for me, the book had the ideal ending.

Richard Moore has played a blinder with this story and proved that his biography of Robert Millar was no fluke.

I would recommend `Slaying the Badger' not just to fans of cycling and the Tour de France, but to any fan of sporting drama! A delightful read. Thank you Richard.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant, instant classic of cycling literature., 14 Jun 2011
By 
D. R. Gow "David" (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
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Having enjoyed Richard Moore's fascinating biography of Robert Millar, I was excited to see he had again turned his pen towards obsessive characters in this classic period of cycling history. Not only is the book superbly written, but the apparent level of research he has made into his subjects is staggering. Combine this with Moore's genuine insight into the mind of sportsmen, and you have a book that will delight any reader, while still providing surprises for the best-informed sports fans. Superb.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LeMond 1 - Badger Nil, 3 Jun 2011
I don't think I'm spoiling anyone's read when I say that LeMond comes out on top in this one (otherwise it would only be "attempted slaying" of said Badger, aka Bernard Hinault), but what a fantastic story of two emulous teammates vying for the top prize in such a storied and brutal sport.

I was eager to get my hands on a copy when I saw this become available to pre-order. Firstly, as a cycling fan it represents welcome respite from the current doping scandals in which the sport is embroiled. While you may, after reading the book (especially the first few paragraphs), feel that it wasn't exactly a "clean" race, I would much rather read about tactical intrigue and sub-plots than any pharmaceutical underhandedness.

Secondly, having enjoyed his first couple of books, I was keen to read more from Moore given the entertaining and well informed style through which he delivers a story. Having said that, don't just take the word of a self-professed fan; I think the awards and critical acclaim he has received to date make a good case for reading his books.

There are already plenty of detailed professional reviews which dissect the whole book and provide a synopsis of virtually the entire story. However, having read many of the reviews while waiting for my copy to arrive I would advise against reading them and just get stuck into the book itself. Given that the story played out some 25 years ago, even those who followed the race at the time will have forgotten a lot of the detail. To approach the book fresh allows you to re-live it but with the added benefit of the thoroughly researched commentary provided by Moore as well as the thoughts and views of the protagonists themselves.

Finally (and at the risk of sounding patronising) for those that don't necessarily follow cycling, it is written in a style that doesn't assume a detailed knowledge and understanding of the sport. In fact, I would say it is a good case-study through which to introduce yourself to this (once?) magnificent sport.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest Ever Tour?, 22 Feb 2014
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I don't think I'd agree with 'Greatest Ever Tour de France', but a cracking good read. I wasn't sure I wanted to read it, as Hinault was (and still is) my cycling hero, but I like my heroes with a bit of character, and that's what comes across.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars more than cycling, 17 Oct 2011
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It's a bit of a cliche, but cycle racing is a lot more than just pedaling a bike faster than the other bloke. This book gives a good insight to the political maneuvering, intrigue and egos in professional cycling. It is epic, it's more than just racing, it is the whole of life seen in the cycling bubble.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book about a great race, 19 Jun 2011
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C. Barnes (UK) - See all my reviews
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Richard Moore is the perfect writer to tell the tale of the 1986 Tour de France and the rivalry between Bernard Hinault and Greg Le Mond. His passion and knowledge of cycling shine through as they did in the other two books by him that I have read, In Search of Robert Millar: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain's Most Successful Tour de France Cyclist: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain's Most Successful Tour De France Cyclist and Heroes, Villains and Velodromes: Chris Hoy and Britain's Track Cycling Revolution but it is ability to construct a narrative and the fluid style of his writing that makes him stand so tall in the ranks of modern sports writers. The story of this epic race is told through the words of people who were there. Le Mond and Hinault themselves as well as directeur sportives and fellow riders. Moore introduces us to all the players, giving us a background to each of their perspectives and an idea of their personalities and then tells to unfolding story through their words so that you finish the book feeling like you have been there in the heart of the race yourself. It reads like a gripping novel so well is it constructed. As I write this we're 2 weeks away from the 2011 Tour de France and this is a book I would strongly advise you read as to set your pulse racing in anticipation of this year's race.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and Engaging Read, 11 Jun 2011
Read the kindle version as I travel a lot so I did not have the enjoyment of the real book in my hands. I remember the 1986 TDF but did not appreciate the battle unfolding, not on the road, but in the background, in the hotel rooms and in the team car. I am not a man on many words so if you like your cycling, like your TDF, just go an read the book. It is enagaging and hard to put down. You will enjoy it.

Dave IH (Ibby)
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A different opinion, 21 July 2011
Richard Moore's Slaying the Badger seems to have gained universal praise and so it's with some trepidation that I offer a dissenting opinion. Don't get me wrong: the story of the 1986 Tour is a fascinating one. I'm just not sure that this book tells it in a fascinating way.

I should probably make clear at the outset that I work as a writer and editor. That means that I have a horrible tendency to mentally edit books as I read them. Often, there are things which irritate me which I'm sure would bother no-one else. But in other instances there are problems with the language so fundamental that I'm sure they bother people regardless of whether they are paid to spot misplaced apostrophes. This is one of those instances.

A big part of the problem for me is the tendency to cram far too many ideas into one sentence. Sometimes this simply leads to clumsy phrasing: "Laurent Fignon, it becomes clear whenever the road begins to rise, is, as his performance in the time trial in Nantes had suggested, finished."

In others, it leads to sentences which resemble paragraphs and which took me several read-throughs to understand: "And here LeMond, as he so often does, segues quickly into an anecdote that at first seems to veer off at a tangent to the discussion we've just been having, only to home back in on the point, and to reveal something fundamental, in this case shedding light on Köchli's intransigence, which, with someone as dizzily hyperactive as LeMond, must surely have been the most significant barrier to a flourishing professional relationship forming between the two." Admittedly, that is the worst example I found of a sentence which really should have been broken up. But it wasn't the only one. Often dashes are used to try to separate ideas, but that just leads to awkward passages such as these: "His eldest son, Geoffrey - a baby during the 1986 Tour - had taken up the sport, and LeMond - just like his father had done in 1975 in Montana - began cycling regularly with him. In 2007 father and son travelled to France to ride L'Étape du Tour - a stage of the Tour de France - together." The often-awkward phrasing meant that too often I found reading this book very hard work indeed.

In my opinion, the author has also made strange choices in how he tells the story. My Kindle version reveals that the description of the 1986 Tour doesn't start until more than 60 percent of the way into the book. While the background is undoubtedly of relevance, it did leave me feeling that the description of the race itself was greatly rushed. I can't help but wonder how much better the book would have been if each chapter were focused on each stage of the race, with flashbacks to relevant background. I also fear the tendency to directly quote and cite sources (typically books, television interviews, and interviews conducted by the author himself) detracts from the drama of the story. Too often I felt like I was reading an academic tome. Much better, surely, would have been to weave this information directly into the text. Very little seems to have been paraphrased, and I often found this jarring.

As I say, there's no doubt that I'm a linguistic nitpicker and that my enjoyment of Slaying the Badger was considerably marred as a result. But I do fear that there are some issues so dramatic that they will affect any reader's enjoyment. The 1986 Tour makes for a brilliant book. But it saddens me to say I don't think that book has been written yet.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read For Anyone Who Loves Cycling, 14 Aug 2014
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Third book I have read by Richard Moore and the best of all. Fantastically well told, with the first half providing thw background and lead up to the 1986 TdF and the second half giving a blwo by blow account of the race. Richard does not shy away from calling it as it was and backs this up by weaving in a rich tapestry of first hand witness statements from key players including the two great men themselves.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book. Easy to read and has some insightful, 4 July 2014
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Great book. Easy to read and has some insightful.moments.
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