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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant! The Best Tour ever.
Absolutely brilliant retelling of the events surrounding the 1986 Tour de France by Richard Moore. This was the first Tour broadcast on British TV by Channel 4 and as it was also my first Tour it brought back many many great memories.

Moore tries to unravel the events surrounding Lemond's victory and whether or not his team mate, Hinault (the badger) was riding...
Published on 15 Jun. 2011 by Joman73

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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A different opinion
Richard Moore's Slaying the Badger seems to have gained universal praise and so it's with some trepidation that I offer a dissenting opinion. Don't get me wrong: the story of the 1986 Tour is a fascinating one. I'm just not sure that this book tells it in a fascinating way.

I should probably make clear at the outset that I work as a writer and editor. That...
Published on 21 July 2011 by readie


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant! The Best Tour ever., 15 Jun. 2011
Absolutely brilliant retelling of the events surrounding the 1986 Tour de France by Richard Moore. This was the first Tour broadcast on British TV by Channel 4 and as it was also my first Tour it brought back many many great memories.

Moore tries to unravel the events surrounding Lemond's victory and whether or not his team mate, Hinault (the badger) was riding against him to gain victory for himself and win an unprecedented sixth victory. Claim and counter claim from our two protagonists ensure that the `truth' will never be known, however, by interviewing many of the major players of the 1986 Tour, Moore manages to add further intrigue and controversy to an already legendary tale.

Both Lemond and Hinault are brilliant characters (Hinault is simply a mad Frenchman - check out when he was driving and texting) and I found it difficult to take sides. As a result, for me, the book had the ideal ending.

Richard Moore has played a blinder with this story and proved that his biography of Robert Millar was no fluke.

I would recommend `Slaying the Badger' not just to fans of cycling and the Tour de France, but to any fan of sporting drama! A delightful read. Thank you Richard.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant, instant classic of cycling literature., 14 Jun. 2011
By 
D. R. Gow "David" (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
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Having enjoyed Richard Moore's fascinating biography of Robert Millar, I was excited to see he had again turned his pen towards obsessive characters in this classic period of cycling history. Not only is the book superbly written, but the apparent level of research he has made into his subjects is staggering. Combine this with Moore's genuine insight into the mind of sportsmen, and you have a book that will delight any reader, while still providing surprises for the best-informed sports fans. Superb.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LeMond 1 - Badger Nil, 3 Jun. 2011
I don't think I'm spoiling anyone's read when I say that LeMond comes out on top in this one (otherwise it would only be "attempted slaying" of said Badger, aka Bernard Hinault), but what a fantastic story of two emulous teammates vying for the top prize in such a storied and brutal sport.

I was eager to get my hands on a copy when I saw this become available to pre-order. Firstly, as a cycling fan it represents welcome respite from the current doping scandals in which the sport is embroiled. While you may, after reading the book (especially the first few paragraphs), feel that it wasn't exactly a "clean" race, I would much rather read about tactical intrigue and sub-plots than any pharmaceutical underhandedness.

Secondly, having enjoyed his first couple of books, I was keen to read more from Moore given the entertaining and well informed style through which he delivers a story. Having said that, don't just take the word of a self-professed fan; I think the awards and critical acclaim he has received to date make a good case for reading his books.

There are already plenty of detailed professional reviews which dissect the whole book and provide a synopsis of virtually the entire story. However, having read many of the reviews while waiting for my copy to arrive I would advise against reading them and just get stuck into the book itself. Given that the story played out some 25 years ago, even those who followed the race at the time will have forgotten a lot of the detail. To approach the book fresh allows you to re-live it but with the added benefit of the thoroughly researched commentary provided by Moore as well as the thoughts and views of the protagonists themselves.

Finally (and at the risk of sounding patronising) for those that don't necessarily follow cycling, it is written in a style that doesn't assume a detailed knowledge and understanding of the sport. In fact, I would say it is a good case-study through which to introduce yourself to this (once?) magnificent sport.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great recount of a great Tour ..., 18 July 2011
However, Moore has gone a lot further than just review a race that took place 25 years ago.

What I really enjoyed about 'Slaying the Badger' was the detail the author has gone to in relayig the story of what he believes is the greatest Tour de France ever. Rather than just rehash some newspaper clippings, Moore has revisited the main characters of his book - LeMond and Hinault - to get their views on that gripping race. And that is what makes it such a fascinating read.

By sitting down with the two riders, along with several other key players [Hampsten, Kochli etc], Moore has been able to paint a vivid picture of what those 3 weeks in July 1986 were really like.

Moore's style of writing is easy to follow, and at times witty, but that is not to say its shallow. His very perceptive observations of his interview subjects goes a long way to helping us understand their personalities, their strengths and weaknesses. And it is these traits that are so integral to the controversy of the 1986 race.

I also enjoyed how the 'human element' is central to the story line. At a time when we can sometimes look to professional cyclists as mere robots, or machines, Moore helps us to appreciate the emotional composition of his subjects - including Bernard Hinault!

Was it the greatest Tour de France Ever? Moore may think so, and he has made a pretty compelling argument in his book. I will reserved judgment on whether '86 was better than '89. But I will say that 'Slaying the Badger' was the most enjoyable Tour de France account I have ever read.

I would throughly recommend this book to anyone who has any interest in cycling.

A great read. 5 stars.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book about a great race, 19 Jun. 2011
By 
C. Barnes (UK) - See all my reviews
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Richard Moore is the perfect writer to tell the tale of the 1986 Tour de France and the rivalry between Bernard Hinault and Greg Le Mond. His passion and knowledge of cycling shine through as they did in the other two books by him that I have read, In Search of Robert Millar: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain's Most Successful Tour de France Cyclist: Unravelling the Mystery Surrounding Britain's Most Successful Tour De France Cyclist and Heroes, Villains and Velodromes: Chris Hoy and Britain's Track Cycling Revolution but it is ability to construct a narrative and the fluid style of his writing that makes him stand so tall in the ranks of modern sports writers. The story of this epic race is told through the words of people who were there. Le Mond and Hinault themselves as well as directeur sportives and fellow riders. Moore introduces us to all the players, giving us a background to each of their perspectives and an idea of their personalities and then tells to unfolding story through their words so that you finish the book feeling like you have been there in the heart of the race yourself. It reads like a gripping novel so well is it constructed. As I write this we're 2 weeks away from the 2011 Tour de France and this is a book I would strongly advise you read as to set your pulse racing in anticipation of this year's race.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read, 20 July 2011
While most readers will probably know the outcome of the Lemond/Hinault duel, with the title of the book giving you a heavy hint, Richard Moore has delivered a book that tells a quite gripping tale of what on reflection was a golden age for those following the Tour de France.

For those watching on TV, for the first time Channel 4's nightly offering provided an option beyond the weekly half hour of highlights available previously via World of Sport. Perhaps this is the reason why my own memory of this tour remains particularly vivid with the little details of events provided by Moore providing a trigger for a whole host of adjacent memories.

The book appears extremely well researched with the background detail on the main characters serves to add more intrigue to the story. Overall, once again Richard Moore has written a book that I found it hard to put down.

If there is a criticism it is that I felt the book gave Lemond a more sympathetic hearing than it gave Hinault and it would be interesting to know if this emanated from Moore's leaning at the time or is it the result of his interviews and investigations when writing the book.

Such a minor criticism does not detract overall and I wouldn't hesitate ion once again giving Richard a five star rating.
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4.0 out of 5 stars La Vie Claire, 10 Jan. 2013
This review is from: Slaying the Badger: LeMond, Hinault and the Greatest Ever Tour de France (Paperback)
The 1986 tour was one of the greats. It was the first one I saw on tv and really captured my imagination. Between Channel Four's coverage and the imagaes and writing in Winning magazine, it's been seared into my memory ever since. Richard Moore effectively brings the race back to life and does a good job of biogs on Hinault and Lemond. There's loads of fascinating detail on the major players in the race, on the teams and behind the scenes, there is a lot to recommend this book.

However, despite having purchased the second updated issue of the book, I have to take issue with Moore's assessment of Hinault's record at Paris Roubaix - (I'm aware I'm into nitpicking here). Moore states (on pages 47/48)that Hinault's involvement was limited to "riding and winning Paris - Roubaix the cobbled 'Hell of The North' only once" due to the riders own low opinion of the race.
That simply is not true and for the record; Hinault rode every year from 1978 to 1982 never finishing outside the first eleven places.

Despite this glitch, it's still a fascinating book (as all Moore's cycling books are)and well worth a read. For more info on Lemond I'd recommend Sam Abt's 'The Incredible Comeback' and 'In High Gear' also by Abt.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Completely engrossing, 9 Feb. 2013
By 
C. Divers "josedivs" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Having been introduced to the Tour de France in the time of Indurain, a lot of the cyclists mentioned in here fall into the category of those I had heard mentioned but knew little about, including Lemond and Hinault.
In fact, one of the things I did know about LeMond was that he had been distanced from cycling to a point because of Armstrong (I read this about a year before everything collapsed on Lance).
Richard Moore does not fall into the trap of purely describing the event which will be the climactic part of the narrative, which for me would have been problematic as I did not know enough about either man to walk straight into it. He devotes an appropriate amount of time to describing the history of each man, which enables you to understand the way each acts once we are put into the world of professional cycling.
This is a great book and I would thoroughly recommend it to anyone with even a passing interest in the subject. If you are feeling disillusioned about cycling post Armstrong: read about LeMond, a man who publicly questioned him and who I trully believe in.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Sports Writing, 12 Sept. 2011
By 
John A. Bell "Jibsa" (newcastle upon Tyne U.K) - See all my reviews
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The writer has researched this book and spoke to all the main players and written his findings beautifully.
Moving, amusing and he gets across great insight into the pyschology of the athlete.

It really gets under the skin of the sport I previously knew little about.
He writes not only of the Tour of 86 when Hinault and Lemond were "at each others throats" but descibes
the backgrounds of the protagonists which previously in sports biographical writing I'd found tedious. Not here.

A very skilled writer and one who can identify what quotes to leave in and what to omit. Some great photographs included as well which back up in pictures the writers words. It had me crying and
laughing at situations and characters to shaking my head in wonder at cycling achievment.

If your'e a cycling fan or if you just remember Bernard Hinault from the eighties and have an interest in sports writing I cant recommend this book highly enough.

The best sports book I have ever read and I've read a few.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and Engaging Read, 11 Jun. 2011
Read the kindle version as I travel a lot so I did not have the enjoyment of the real book in my hands. I remember the 1986 TDF but did not appreciate the battle unfolding, not on the road, but in the background, in the hotel rooms and in the team car. I am not a man on many words so if you like your cycling, like your TDF, just go an read the book. It is enagaging and hard to put down. You will enjoy it.

Dave IH (Ibby)
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