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344 of 356 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly astonishing!
Many of the people who have reviewed this book have first hand experience of children with behavioural problems, or links to Aspergers and / or Autism. They have (almost entirely) commented on how this book reflects in some way their experiences or that of friends or relatives. They have almost all enjoyed the book, and having read these reviews you may feel that, if you...
Published on 8 Mar. 2004 by Nick Edwards

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276 of 306 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Adults book in a Children's Cover
If I were reviewing this as an adult's book then I would award it 5 stars without any hesitation. Any book that holds my attention to such a degree that I read it in one sitting certainly deserves that, despite the fact that towards the end I started to lose sympathy for the narrator.
However, this review deals with the so-called Children's Edition. Although the text...
Published on 16 Aug. 2004


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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing Visit Inside the Autistic Mind and Look at Math, 1 Jun. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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This novel is one of the most unusual that I have ever read. I initially gauged its success by how well emotionally engaged I was by the story. For the first half, I was gripped . . . but the book tailed off from there. If I only looked at the book from that perspective, I would grade it a 3. But the book also contains interesting references to science and math that reminded me of John Paulos's books on how a mathematician looks at the world. Those parts I rated at a 5. So the two perspectives came out to a 4. But if you don't particularly like math or science, this will be an average novel for you before you are done.
The premise is simple. Fifteen-year-old Christopher John Francis Boone is autistic with many emotional complications (including not being able to read others' emotions) . . . and also has a brilliant mind for logic. Because of his fascinating experiences, his teacher, Siobhan encourages him to write a book . . . which is this one.
It's easy to think of Christopher as much younger than he is . . . with problems concerning strangers, others touching him, and wetting himself. But then the brilliant mind comes out, and you feel like you are in contact with a professor. The combination is fascinating in the first half of the book as Christopher tries to find out who stuck a pitchfork through the neighbor's dog. As a twist on The Hound of the Baskervilles, that part of the book is irresistible.
Once that mystery is solved, the book seems to veer off into less realistic and less emotionally compelling material. Christopher's character was no longer completely believable to me. The writing seemed more like an exercise by an author than Christopher's own as the "author" of this book.
I treasured though those parts of the book that help me understand how an autistic person might view the world. It reminded me of those jumbled letters and reversed numbers on cards that teachers show to simulate what dyslexia is like for those who are not dyslexic. Such journeys in another's footsteps are rewarding and I encourage you to seek them out.
Based on this first novel, I can only hope that we will read more about Christopher in the future. I suggest, though, that the knife be left behind.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clever!, 17 Oct. 2006
A very moving and clever story about a boy that doesnt see the world as everyone else does. Its written as a diary and can take a bit of time to get into.

Originally made a a childrens book, it has proven to be of interest for adults as well. So much in deed that its been realesed with both an adult and a childrens cover.

If you havent read it, please do! It doesnt take you that long, and it is well worth it!

HIGHLY original (and how often can we say that these days!??)
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29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Why is This Called the Children's Edition?, 28 Feb. 2005
By 
Chrestomanci (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is specifically for the children's edition and is intended to clear up any misunderstandings.
Let's get one thing absolutely clear: there are two editions of this book, and the only difference between the adult's version and children's version is the cover design. The children's version is NOT simplified in terms of plot, (for those who bemoan that they've "ONLY read the children's version"), it is NOT modified in terms of content or language (ALL the swearing and numerous four letter words are intact); it is quite simply the adult's book with an alternate cover featuring child-friendly artwork.
The language content is perfectly consistent with the narrative and characters - and is nothing unusual for an adult's book. Whether you feel this book is something suitable for a child is not something I wish to comment on; that decision is up to each individual parent to make based on their own values and parenting codes. Just be fully aware: the children's version is NOT an abridgement of the story edited to tone down the adult content.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A warning to parents!, 8 Jan. 2005
By A Customer
Having read and thoroughly enjoyed the adult version, I bought the children's version for my 11 year old daughter, assuming the bad language would have been deleted. I soon realised it hadn't when she gleefully told me. As no warning is given either on or inside the book, parents may want to take care. That aside, this is a wonderful, insightful story, beautifully written in a way that appeals to adults as well as [teenage?] children.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars sensational, 3 Jun. 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (Hardcover)
Simply astonishingly good. I laughed, I cried, I read between the lines, but most importantly of all I believed. My younger brother has Asperger's, and much of the narration was desperately familiar. By the end of the book I was half-convinced that I have it myself. Tremendous.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short but compelling read, 13 Dec. 2006
By 
R. J. Dean (UK) - See all my reviews
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A cover to cover read occupied a flight back from Warsaw so it isn't War and Peace in terms of length. The simpler language made this a thoroughly easy and enjoyable short read.

It had a compelling quality about it with the brutally honest, almost linear world view of the narrator, mixing excellently with some of the subtler and more complicated aspects of the lives of people around. The distinction between the mother's aspiration to be the mother, and her actual ability, coupled with the challenge to the father in terms of putting his son first versus his own personal troubles, are exposed incrementally through the book. I enjoyed the gradual unravelling of the well-intentioned fabric of lies or half-truths laid over the boy's life as a result of his single-minded attempt to solve the incident in the title.

Chapter 1 was the best - read it twice.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile read, 8 April 2006
A friend recommended this book to me and i was sceptical at first but after a few pages i fell in love with the boy and the unusual way in which the chapters are structured and the reason why. He is endearing and you really get inside his head! It gives you a greater appreciation not just for people with his problem but also those looking after him. Also it reminds you once again never to judge a book by its cover as from the outside he appears, well, mad but on the inside there is a perfectly good explanation why he feels that way. Although frustrating at times as it takes a while to get to the point sometimes its worth sticking it out to get to the end. It's surprisingly emotional and the ending was not expected. Anyway i don't want to spoil it for you but give it a go, it doesn't take to long to read and the pictures are easy on the eyes. Hope you enjoy!
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A necessary read, 5 May 2004
By 
Taliesin_ttlg (Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (Hardcover)
How can I review this book, without giving much of the story away. After all it is a murder mystery, to give plot hints would do the book and the author a disservice.
Let me, instead, tell you how it moved me. I must admit, therfore, to be biased. My son is on the autistic spectrum. Not as effected as the main character and narrator, Christopher. Yet I found resonances within the book that moved me to tears, something a book has not done for many years.
This is the joy and the pain of the book. Haddon has described the autistic world brilliantly and made it accesable to non-autistics. This book should be necessary reading material to all who could come into contact with autistics, in order to help us understand the world from their perspective.
The story itself is bleak, so dark in fact it is positively black. Yet there are moments of humour born from the narrator not because of the narrator. All told it is a book I did not want to end, though it was painful to read. Highly recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow what a fantastic book, 3 Aug. 2004
By 
Martin Bramidge (Portsmouth, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Mark Haddon has written a modern masterpiece. A world view from a different angle, sometimes strange, frightening, occasional black humour, but always touching and enlightening. A boy's mind seemingly closed to the outside world but with an amazing capacity for understanding certain logical processes. I am reminded of the thin line between madness and genius which is trodden with great care by the author in this particular book.
Basically - I loved it !
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read, 5 Jun. 2005
By 
Mrs. D. Green "deek43" (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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I brought this book because my son has been recently diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. He is a pre-teen and I wanted to get an insight into what I can expect in the future and to see if there were any "clues" for dealing with the condition - there aren't. But that said, it was an entertaining read, stilted and confusing sometimes but I could see where he was going - detective he ain't! If you know nothing about Aspergers, just remember one thing - they take everything literally. The part with the colours of the cars are because he doesn't understand/know what makes a day good or bad, so he decides on the way to school - counting cars. There is swearing in the book, but its an everyday thing and I'm sure you all say it or think it when you are annoyed. I believe this book should be for a 12+ child or adult.
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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon (Hardcover - 1 May 2003)
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