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4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book covering an important niche
Like many web-related technologies XML and its many derivatives have evolved much more quickly than the support from traditional modelling and development tools. As a result many developers creating XML-based applications are doing so with the crudest of tools, and find it very difficult to either exchange ideas with more traditional developers, or to benefit from the...
Published on 10 May 2011 by Andrew Johnston

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful coverage of an interesting area.
XML seems in line to become a ubiquitous technology, and its intersection with the Unified Modeling Language is an interesting territory to explore.
David Carlson's book covers a lot of material, including some background on each of the technologies, which helps to set the scene nicely.
The text is in three parts, dealing with "Foundations", "XML...
Published on 21 May 2001


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful coverage of an interesting area., 21 May 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Modeling XML Applications with UML (Object Technology Series) (Paperback)
XML seems in line to become a ubiquitous technology, and its intersection with the Unified Modeling Language is an interesting territory to explore.
David Carlson's book covers a lot of material, including some background on each of the technologies, which helps to set the scene nicely.
The text is in three parts, dealing with "Foundations", "XML Vocabularies" and "Deployment" respectively. The overall themes are a fictitious B2B markup vocabulary and an example e-business portal using this. In general these served well as examples, but wouldn't be immediately relevant to the entire audience who could potentially benefit from the book.
I didn't find the use cases presented in part one very helpful, as they are little more than titles of use cases with general, high level discussion instead of having specific interaction steps. (It's possible that these use cases might provide a rough model for an e-business project similar to the example though.)
The second part of the book was more specific, and the text was mainly clear and readable. Unfortunately the important material towards the end on generating schemas left me rather unclear on what should be proper the treatment of UML associations. This was a shame, because the earlier chapter on linking makes it clear that this is a subject the author is something of an authority on. Using a simpler, restated UML model and presenting the schemas alongside a conformant XML instance document would have helped.
Part three gives a necessarily brief introduction to XSLT, and shows how it might be used for transforming vocabularies and for presentation. The final chapter reviews some of the newest aspects of e-business architecture.
What I hadn't appreciated, until I started reading this, is that the mapping from UML to XML is covered by an OMG specification for XML Metadata Interchange (XMI). The practical implications of this are well described in the book. The author's stated objective of imparting "actionable knowledge" is also achieved in large measure.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book covering an important niche, 10 May 2011
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Andrew Johnston "(www.andrewj.com/books)" (LEATHERHEAD United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Modeling XML Applications with UML (Object Technology Series) (Paperback)
Like many web-related technologies XML and its many derivatives have evolved much more quickly than the support from traditional modelling and development tools. As a result many developers creating XML-based applications are doing so with the crudest of tools, and find it very difficult to either exchange ideas with more traditional developers, or to benefit from the strengths of more powerful tools and modelling approaches. This book sets out to address that issue, and it does an excellent job.
At the same time, the book provides a valuable introduction to a range of XML and e-Business technologies for those more familiar with traditional approaches. I found it answered a lot of questions I had about XML which had not been addressed by reading more typical "how to" books, so this book bridges the divide both ways.

The book starts out by setting out its aim - to bridge the XML and UML communities, and provides a high-level overview of both areas. It then focuses in on the key issue of e-Business integration, both as a common challenge and an area which will naturally affect both communities.

In subsequent chapters the author discusses defining a business vocabulary, and shows how an XML vocabulary can be modelled in UML, or generated from it. Having established this basis the author then discusses a number of XML-related standards, including XMI, XPath, XPointer, XLink, XML DTDs and Schemas, and XSLT, in each case using UML models to explain how the pieces fit together.

Finally, the last few chapters present an overall e-Business architecture based around the examples in the rest of the book, bringing all the pieces together in the context of Web Services.

It's the curse of all technical writers and publishers that whatever you write is rapidly out of date, and this book suffers a little from that. Published in 2001 it views several key standards (such as XSD and core Web Service protocols) as "proposals", and frequently omits details from examples because of this uncertainty. A reader would be well advised to supplement it with more up to date reading around the technical details.

That said, this book is well written, easy to read, and covers a niche which is still almost unoccupied. The companion web site backs the book up with some valuable material, including a free downloadable tool for XML modelling, generation and reverse-engineering.

I'd love David to do a second edition, moderately refreshed to present a 2004 view of the various standards and how they fit together. The core of the book wouldn't have to change. Until that book turns up, I'm happy to recommend this one.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Insightful, Practical & Timely., 7 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Modeling XML Applications with UML (Object Technology Series) (Paperback)
For readers with some familiarity with XML and UML, this book explores the intersection of these technologies and convincingly integrates analysis, design and deployment of e-Business applications into a common analysis & design approach.
The book covers the full spectrum from Foundations to Deployment but its "tour-de-force" lies in its section on Vocabularies. As Schema modeling becomes more "object-oriented" with the introduction of XML Schema Recommendation, Dave Carlson describes a practical approach to modeling within the UML framework.
Proprietary graphical notations offered by specialist XML IDEs tend to present XML models in a "serialized" form, usually a tree structure. By using UML, the true nature of vocabularies - a network of containment, reference and inheritance relationships, can be viewed directly in a way that promotes comprehensibility, reuse and process integration.
In both concept and execution, the result is a very clean UML-XML mapping: well defined, clearly explained and solidly supported, by a running example. The accompanying website enables readers to consolidate their understanding by interacting with the example model and develop Schemas from their own UML models.
If you're involved in XML analysis/design and have access to UML tools, this book is essential. Standards bodies and tool vendors take note: Schema development should be done this way!
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Modeling XML Applications with UML (Object Technology Series)
Modeling XML Applications with UML (Object Technology Series) by David Carlson (Paperback - 10 April 2001)
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