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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 18 February 1999
Although this book is seminal in as much as it presents use-cases, it is definitely not the clearest introduction to OO. It does however present Jacobson's OOSE methodology (which is a simplified version of the Objectory methodology). The book is due for an update - and I believe one has been in the pipeline for a while. However, with the release of UML and the new Rational methodology, it is perhaps best left as is.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 May 1997
Jacobson's use case approach has had a profound impact on the field of object oriented analysis and design. Use cases represent a powerful means of capturing system requirements and driving the development of object-oriented software. Jacobson avoids software "dogma" and presents a comprehensive, powerful and practical process for OO software development. If you do any work in OO development, you need this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 January 2013
I am reviewing many years after reading this book, so I won't say much.
But I remember it really helped me out when I had to develop a very complicate state machine representing a satellite.
This book gave me the idea to implement the state machine using the polymorphism, and all became not only much easier, but also architecturally very clear, with well separated software layers.
Thank you Jacobson.
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on 6 November 1998
This book is considered a classic by many. The key contribution of the book is the introduction of Use Cases for requirements capture. Jacobson also provides some good hints on how to develop an OO design after starting from Use Cases.
There are two big weaknesses with this book. Firstly, the book is vague on the amount of detail that should go into a Use Case. This has led to a great amount of confusion and widely different usages in industry. Secondly, the book provides only weak design guidelines beyond those provided for extracting objects from the Use Cases.
Another criticism of the book is that it is written in a very academic tone, which may be hard to understand for some readers.
Another book that covers much of the same ground but in a clearer fashion is Ian Graham's _Migrating to Object Technology_.
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on 16 September 2002
The proof of the book is in actually using the methods described and having worked on a couple of projects that have used this book (and Iconix process) as their bible, I've found there are serious problems.
The main problem is the over-emphasis on use cases driving the whole project. Use cases are fine for functional requirements, but only in the middle of the project did we realise that these represent a mere part of a whole project. For example, design patterns (e.g. Observer, Factory, State etc etc) and other architectural constructs tend to slip out of a Use-Case driven approach, leading to a very poor quality OO design.
The process outlined here looked good in the book, but it's value depends on the nature of the project. Having used it, I'm very skeptical of having Use Cases drive a software project.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 19 March 1998
One of the best computer related books I have ever read. Comprehensive, well structured and well written.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 7 October 1998
I read 50 pages without ever seeing the word 'object' and gave up. I don't know why people think this is such a great book, it is abstract and impenatrable. The Booch book (OOA&D) is much clearer and easy to read
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 8 November 1996
The book is very clear and, at the same time, very deep and sharp.
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