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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 January 2011
This book is just amazing. Feynman is a brilliant and terribly honest teacher. It makes you aware of the fact that if you have not studied Physics before you will unlikely be a physicist thanks to this book. However, he also makes clear that fully grasping this first six easy pieces (which are pretty easy indeed!) is a prerequisite to began to see the world as an actual physicist should do. The edition is simple, but - it seems - almost complete. You will find (two) original prefaces, and a detailed description of how the (idea of this) book arose. You feel lucky to read this book: it is like you're sitting in a class lead by an excellent teacher and you can ask the teacher to re-state everything until you have fully understood each world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 March 2014
Feynman is often lauded as the greatest modern physicist - not just for his work, but for his ability to communicate. This book proves that fantastically.

These lectures are easy. Anyone who has done GCSE Physics will find themselves recovering familiar territory in the first chapter, but rest assured it does get a lot more interesting. Once comfortable subjects such as potential energies and moments are covered, the world of quantum mechanics is entered, and frankly the book is worth 5 stars just for the last chapter. Quite simply, despite having read many popular physics books, I have never seen such a comprehensible yet in-depth introduction into QM, no complex differentials required.

Well worth the read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2011
Great Book, I have really enjoyed reading it.

Whilst it is called Six "Easy" Pieces, it does go into a fair bit of detail in explaining the various topics, however it is written on the basis that the reader has no understanding of Physics. As such it is understandable if you have little or no physics knowledge!

Feynman also manages to bring some personality into the topics discussed and his passion for the topics really shines through!

In summary if you are looking to refresh your knowledge of things you learnt in school, or perhaps trying to improve your knowledge so you can discuss Physics with your friends or children if they are studying it in school then this book is a good place to start..

Highly Recommended!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 11 July 2012
This book is very imspirating, yes u read corectly INSPIRATING, because this book it's not about only physics it can help u to see the world from many aspects, go buy it u will learn more than physics.

Soryy for my bad english, hope u understanded me.

Have a nice day !
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33 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on 6 May 1999
This book is a selection of six chapters from a larger work. It suffers occasionally from references to chapters that were not selected. It is not a book for beginners in Physics, though perhaps beginners could manage the first chapter. For readers who already know some Physics, it presents valuable insights into parts of the subject, and into the relation between Physics and other sciences. The discussion of the experiment on the interference patterns from electrons fired at a pair of slits is very illuminating.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 15 August 2014
For a non-physics trained soul this book is brilliant; if you could only choose one man to read in this world this would be it. The way he explains the basics is the very best, with humour and care for his subject, he was the topdog and still is!
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on 27 August 2014
In the early 1960s the renown physicist, Richard Feynman, delivered introductory courses on physics to first and second year undergraduate students at Caltech, in the USA. His lectures were very popular at the time and whilst aimed at undergraduates, it wasn't uncommon for graduate physics students to infiltrate his classes; the one thing Feynman could be assured of was a full house each time he came to teach this course. The lectures, after some editing, were published in three large volumes. To provide a flavour of the overall series, this book extracts just six from the collection and, as the title of this book suggests, these are regarded as being six of the easier ones to understand. They're entitled "Atoms in motion", "Basic physics, "The relation of physics to other sciences", "Conservation of energy", "The theory of gravitation" and "Quantum behaviour". (There is a companion volume published under the title "Six not-so-easy pieces" but I've not attempted to read that.)

I was attracted to this book not so much by the subject matter, but more by my interest in Feynman himself. He has a solid reputation for being an inspirational teacher and I was keen to see how he managed to achieve this. I was expecting him to take a different strategy from the norm and I wasn't disappointed. To illustrate what I mean, in his lecture on the atom he didn't follow the conventional approach of describing the structure of atoms and building up from there, yet by the end of the talk his students would have heard a physicist's explanation of why blowing on a bowl of soup cools it down. His approach to teaching was so different to what is usually done.

Understandably, given the date of the lectures, there have been major developments in physics, and science in general, since the lectures were first presented. For instance, the talk on nuclear physics is very out of date because the make-up of protons and neutrons was not understand at that time to the extent that it is now. Likewise, the lecture covering the links between physics and biology pre-dates the discovery of the genetic code. Therefore, it is pointless reading this book to gain an understanding of the latest theories. Nevertheless, not everything has changed in 50 years and some lectures are as relevant today as they were then. For example, the lecture on the conservation of energy was wonderfully presented, especially the section on potential energy where Feynman used illustrated examples to explain the conservation of potential energy in reversible machines. On the other hand, I felt he made heavy weather of his account of the two slit experiment in his lecture on quantum mechanics and I've read much better explanations elsewhere. To a marked extent Feynman did over complicate much of his material but this is to expected since his stated intention was to teach to slightly beyond the level of the brightest students in each class; of course, whether or not this was the best strategy is open to debate.

Overall, this book of six "easy" lectures provides remarkable insight into Feynman's style of teaching. He comes across as someone who knew his subject matter inside out, who had boundless energy and complete self-confidence, and who wanted to stretch the minds of his students.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
Feynman is an unusual genius in that he also has a gift for explaining things in a way that makes them appealing.
This is not the book for you if you want to wrestle with the complexities of quantum theory, but it is fascinating to hear more fundamental physics explained by one of the subject's stars.
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I first encountered this series of books, written by Richard P Feynman, in my local book retailer and I was surprised at their size. Despite the nature of their subject, they are barely a couple hundred pages in length. Usually scientific books are much thicker volumes. But when one realises these books were written from notes derived for student presentations by Feynman, then size doesn't really matter. I am more inclined to purchase a 'thin' book than a 'thick' book because apart from being cheaper to buy and easier to carry, it should be an easier book to read. Doubtless, size is a marketing ploy but it means these books are affordable to a great many more people.

The information these books contain, often illustrated by original drawings by the author, help to convey some quite complex theories. These theories maybe right or they maybe wrong but they serve to illustrate the thoughts of a 'genius' whom many professionals believe rivalled Einstein in terms of his vision of how the universe works. Feynman was a controversial, colourful, some say eccentric theoretical physicist who cared little for convention and left an indelible mark in understanding science.

I purchased 3 books in this series and I purchased 3 more for a friend's birthday. Doubtless I will purchase other books in the same series when I have time to read them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 5 February 2014
Not much to say that would surprise anyone: this book was written by a giant in the field and you get a rare opportunity to get a glimpse of him in action. I found it a joy to read, although the concepts were not new to me so not sure how a novice would find it. I do think that the descriptions are clear and this book could be used as an interesting companion to a standard textbook or just a lone read for pleasure and interest. I will buying the rest of his books.
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