Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen with Prime Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars12
4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
7
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£4.49+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

VINE VOICEon 1 October 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Lyrical Ballads is a very important piece of work, not just within the Romanticism movement but within English Literature. This book is exceptionally useful in that it sets contains both the 1798 and 1802 editions.

As is to be expected, this OUP edition contains a useful introduction, extensive endnotes, well presented line numbers alongside the verses.

I would say that this ediion is probably more aimed at the A-Level of undergraduate student studying Romanticism in some detail. There is considerable overlap between the 1798 and 1802 editions (of course, the latter contains extra poems and a useful preface which aren't in the 1798 edition). Where verses differ, the editor often draws the reader's attention to this in the notes. This is very interesting from an acadmic perspective and provides fertile ground for anyone looking to understand how Romanticism developed within those four years, or even do a comparison between different versions. But as something to plonk on the bookshelf at home and delve into from time to time... it's slightly unecessarily too much. There was of course an 1800 edition which, although alluded to from time to time, does not feature completely in this edition. If I were back at university studying Wordsworth, Coleridge or Romanticism more generally, this book would be at the top of my list. In this way, it is similar to the Penguin Classics edition of "The Prelude" (all four editions from 1798, 1979, 1805 and 1850 in one book!).

The only reason I have given this four stars is because, if someone is merely after a tome they can place in their coat pocket and dip into/read while commuting, this is probably ever so slightly too specialist in its contents. I think the OUP edition of "The Major Works" by Wordsworth and the separate OUP edition of "The Major Works" by Coleridge would perhaps be a better introduction into either/both of these two poets.
0Comment|4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This volume includes the original 1798 publication and the 1802 one, containing Wordsworth's Preface which, according to the Introduction is "often treated as a manifesto not only for its authors, but for the entire Romantic movement." The introduction and endnotes are extensive, for anyone who is interested in knowing more about the background or analysis of the poems.

It has always been my personal contention, however, that poems that require explanation have failed (yes, I'm talking about TS Eliot's The Wasteland - the man who requires his readers to have mastered not only Latin and Greek, but also Sanskrit). These poems on the whole are perfectly enjoyable without having to undertake a Masters degree in either poetical analysis or, indeed, languages ancient and modern. So this book is recommended for anyone who enjoys Wordsworth and Coleridge - whether casual poetry readers like myself or those who wish to look a bit deeper.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 26 September 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I've never got on with Wordsworth: I want to like his poetry as I admire his radical politics, his support for the French Revolution, and his social liberalism - but we just don't gel poetically. I was hoping that a re-read of his verse might change my mind, but sadly not. Like Byron, who wrote a scathing retort to Lyrical Ballads, I can't get past the dreadful sentimentality of poems like The Idiot Boy (Byron: `when he tells the tale of Betty Foy | The idiot mother of `an idiot boy' | ... all who view the `idiot in his glory' | Conceive the bard the hero of the story').

Coleridge is more to my taste and the highlight of this volume is the original 1798 text of The Ancyent Marinere, together with the revised 1802 text. This is an extraordinary poem with its urgent narrative, its dislocated rhyme and stanza scheme, and its astonishing imagery and power. And yet, even here, we come to a bathetic climax (`He prayeth well who loveth well | Both man and bird and beast').

Like the other OWCs, this is a good scholarly edition - though Stafford's introduction has a tendency to gush a little at times. So this isn't poetry which particularly `speaks' to me - but if you want an academically reliable edition, this is good.
11 comment|5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 21 November 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The Wordsworth and Coleridge lyrical ballards are well known works to the majority of people and thus need very little introduction. They are memorable and fine consisting, as they do, of such poems as "The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner" (Coleridge) and Wordsworth's descriptions of Lake District life, including the Lucy poems. This is true romantic poetry.

The introduction adds much useful information and I found it helpful but I did not particularly like this edition. The reason for this is that the paper is a little thin and making notes around the poems for study reasons would prove a little difficult as I rather like sturdy pages for this. I would also prefer a more substantial cover given that, in scholastic use, the books always get more wear than normal. I have pointed this out because these volumes often get used in this manner rather than simply languishing on domestic shelves.

A reasonable buy though certainly for the notes.
11 comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 22 February 2014
I love poetry so I decided to add Wordsworth to my shelf, I have enjoyed what I have read so far and feel this is a good addition to my collection although not a favorite yet
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 10 October 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
In 1798, William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge collaborated to produce a booklet of poetry, called, "Lyrical Ballads". In 1802, it was reprinted. This volume contains both versions, along with notes. It also has the original notes, introduction, Coleridge's notes on the Rime of the Ancyent Marinere from the 1817 publication, and some letters to and from Wordsworth. It is ideal for anyone studying these poems.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 16 November 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Another comprehensive publication from the OWC and an absolute joy have both editions of the collection in the same volume. Indispensible.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 26 October 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I'm not someone who reads a lot of poetry but that's something I would like to change, so I decided to try this new Oxford World's Classics edition of Lyrical Ballads, a collaboration by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, first published in 1798. This book contains both the original 1798 version and the revised, expanded one from 1802, together with their prefaces and appendices. There's also an extensive introduction, chronology and notes, though I didn't personally find the notes particularly helpful - and they were sometimes a distraction when I would have preferred to just concentrate on reading the poem.

From the point of view of a casual reader of poetry I don't think it was really necessary to have both the 1798 and 1802 versions together in one book. I would have been happy with just the second one, as it seems to include all the poems from the first edition (though in a slightly different order) as well as a large number of new poems. For students of Romantic poetry, though, it will probably be useful to be able to compare the earlier edition with the later one and see how each was originally presented (any significant changes to wording etc are mentioned in the notes).

Whether or not you like William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, it can't be denied that their Lyrical Ballads was an important work with an influence on both the Romantic Movement and the development of poetry in general. While there were only a few poems in this book that I thought had any real brilliance - such as The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Lines written above Tintern Abbey - I did enjoy reading most of them and found them all easy enough to read even for someone like myself who isn't used to reading poetry. The idea behind Lyrical Ballads was to make poetry accessible to the average person by using simple language that could be understood by everyone, so in this respect I think it was a success.

As this Oxford World's Classics edition is quite academic it would probably be a good choice for students of Romanticism but I think for the general reader like myself it might be better to look for a collection of the most popular works of Wordsworth or Coleridge.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 October 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Another must-have from Oxford, a compilation of poems by two classics that will come in handy as a great reference during high school and beyond.
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 22 September 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I read Wordsworth and Coleridge at school for O-level but I think I would have been a bit put off if I'd had this edition of The Lyrical Ballads. There are lots of notes and I started to find the use of little circles sprinkled through the text (to indicate a note at back) a bit annoying. The whole point of the Romantic poets is that they're accessible. They don't really need lots of explanation and a lot of the notes were neither helpful or interesting. However, it's nice to have an edition which shows the poems pretty much as they would have been published originally, instead of just a selection of the most popular pieces.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.