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Justine, or the Misfortunes of Virtue (Oxford World's Classics)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 9 September 2013
De Sade's material is violent, disturbing and graphically sexual: this is obviously not a novel for children, but neither is it unintelligent sadomasochistic gratification. In Justine, de Sade mercilessly exposes the hypocrisy of his own class - the elite and aristocracy of Paris at the time - using the intellectual language of the day to illustrate worthlessness of academia when used to pursue ultimate self-gratification. As with his other work, 'The Crimes of Love', the themes of good and evil, relative morality and the place of ethics after the death of God, take centre stage. De Sade holds up a very poignant mirror to society at the time (if a slightly twisted or caricatured one) and challenges its inhabitants confront their own dishonest image of its utopia. This edition is worth the additional expense in comparison to other translations (in my opinion), due to its excellent introductory chapters, putting in context the disturbing upbringing and life of de Sade, which may help to place this twisted and enigmatic novel in context. Some may find this a difficult novel to read, as de Sade surely intended - but while my review is not intended to be an apology for the man himself, it is certainly an agreement with his message: if you cannot bear to look upon the darkest truths of human nature/society, you are willingly turning a blind eye to the sins you purport to condemn.
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on 9 April 2015
excellent read
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
The OUP livery finally gave me the push to try my luck with one of de Sade's novels, but perhaps it should not have been. I must assume, not being an authority, that it is a seminal text, of interest to students of crime, philosophy, the philosophy OF crime, social history in France of the period, and of course sexuality. But let's be frank: this is dismal stuff.

Justine and her sister are orphaned and forced to make their way as best they can. Whilst her sister chooses vice as a means of securing her own material prosperity, Justine is determined to live virtuously, to be honest and trustworthy and to guard her chastity. Thereafter follows an odyssey of misadventures as she moves from place to place, encountering aristocrats, professionals, robbers, etc., being betrayed, abused and raped by all and sundry.

Nearly every encounter follows the same pattern: our hapless heroine is taken in and promptly imprisoned, misused, and then they engage in a lengthy debate as the lecherous one explains their own version of the libertine's credo with passionate intensity and the certainty of experience; this in contrast to the poor girl's Christian principles which are expressed pathetically in the moment, stubbornly and with the certainty of blind faith. There is truth on both sides, but the overall picture is a distortion of the world, and a horrible one. And the repetition of suffering, foolishness, extreme sexual cruelty, fruitless debate and unlikely liberation, eventually becomes samey and boring.

It hardly seemed to matter whether I read the final pages or not.

What is remarkable is that this book seems to catalogue all the most grisly sex acts you've heard of, or glimpsed on the information super highway, and if it is the fountain point, the manifesto for adherents of sadomasochism, the Gospel according to Sodomy, than we must wonder how different the world might have been had the Marquis never put quill to parchment. Still, just as Justine is the virtue which gives the crime its savour, so great writing and noble thoughts are more richly illuminating when there's also contrasting sludge and detritus.

I was hoping for a comedy. I was disappointed.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 22 June 2015
Not for me.
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