Customer Reviews


4 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Definitive Sade., 17 Jan 2000
By 
MR S P HARDISTY (CARSHALTON, SURREY United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
The Misfortunes of Virtue is a blistering tale of woe that is unyielding and profane. Sade hurls his "victim" Justine from one catastrophe to another and he is relentless with the misery inflicted upon her. He teases the reader with false hope and deceitful benevolence and leads us into his suffocating nirvana of human indifference and selfishness. Sade's incarcerated psyche penetrates the text and the stench of his pre-Darwinian philosophy lingers painfully from page to page. David Coward's new translation of The Misfortunes of Virtue and other early tales provides an engaging introduction to the literary world of the Marquis De Sade.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Divine Marquis, 24 Sep 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Misfortunes of Virtue and Other Early Tales (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
Written while being held under a lettre de cashet, The Misfortunes of Virtue is an early incarnation of his Justine. Most of the misfortunes visited upon Justine (or Sophie as she calls herself) come from Sade's own life, it is semi-autobiographical. The tale of Justine is contrasted with that of her sister Juliette, the libertine. It's a scorching indictment of the hypocrisies of power and authority, who reign over the weak by forcing them to adopt a morality of piety which the strong never adhere to. Justine suffers because Justine sincerely believes that piety will be rewarded. Further, Justine suffers because Justine is encouraged to believe this by those who reign over her. Sade wants to free Justine, and for doing so he was defamed. If posterity continues to believe in this defamed portrait of the Divine Marquis then it is duped just as Justine was. My recommendation is to read Sade closely, without prejudice, for underneath his imposed diabolical mask is a man of the Enlightenment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting look at the young Marquis., 19 Jan 1996
By A Customer
Sade is known primarily for his unprintable, unpublishable
works, but most of the short stories or fables in this
collection are only slightly risque, if they are at all.
Primarily adaptations of folk tales from around Provence,
or attacks on the administrative figures who hounded him
under three regimes, these stories show a different side of
Sade: the humorist. Also included is _Les Infortunes des
Virtu_, the first version of _Justine_, and considered by
many Sade scholars to be the best.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Different philosophy, 2 July 2013
By 
A. Tetere (Edinburgh, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Misfortunes of Virtue and Other Early Tales (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
Although Sade talks along the lines of liberalization of female sexuality, I see him as giving insights into very male sexual fantasies and reasoning. I love his writing style so rich in vocabulary with elegant humour throughout.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xae1169c8)

This product

The Misfortunes of Virtue and Other Early Tales (Oxford World's Classics)
£6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews