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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clarity at last
I've spent several days recently working through the editions of the Oresteia in English which I already had to hand (Fagles, Thomson, Vellacott), but got little pleasure from them. The language seemed unnecessarily obscure, and the notes were inadequate to explain the significance of the action. As it's an old ambition of mine to read all the surviving Greek tragedies, I...
Published on 18 Jun 2012 by Hapax

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3.0 out of 5 stars Does the job
Contains a good translation for each of the plays and is generally well set out inside. It has the standard introductions and character lists which are handy but doesn't really do anything differently from all the other translations out there.
Published 7 months ago by cameron thorp


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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clarity at last, 18 Jun 2012
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This review is from: Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
I've spent several days recently working through the editions of the Oresteia in English which I already had to hand (Fagles, Thomson, Vellacott), but got little pleasure from them. The language seemed unnecessarily obscure, and the notes were inadequate to explain the significance of the action. As it's an old ambition of mine to read all the surviving Greek tragedies, I thought I'd have one final crack at these plays before moving on to Sophocles, so I ordered this Collard edition last week, though without any great hopes. I'm pleased to say it far exceeded my expectations.

To start with, the language of this translation has a lucidity sadly lacking in the others. This doesn't, however, make the text any the less 'poetic'. On the contrary, it opens access to the dense interplay of words and action, whose significance is made clear in the very full and detailed notes. The introduction is also excellent, summarizing the scholarship on Aeschylus with an assurance which confirms Collard's mastery of the subject. I'll be moving on immediately to buy his edition of the other plays of Aeschylus, and then it's Sophocles, here we come!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Aeschylus: Oresteia, 26 April 2014
By 
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
This Oxford World’s Classics (published 2008) edition of Aeschylus’ Oresteia contains the three plays – Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers and Eumenides – along with copious notes and information provided by the translator Christopher Collard.

There are over 70 pages of introductory material, including analyses of:
1. Aeschylus and the Oresteia
2. A view of the Oresteia
2.1 The dramatic ideas and their sources
2.2 The dramatic design and the characters
2.3 Issues and meanings
2.4 The plays in Aeschylus’ theatre
3. Dramatic form and language in Aeschylus
3.1 Dramatic form in general
3.2 Speech and spoken dialogue
3.3 Choral song and lyric dialogue
3.4 Language and imagery
4. Aeschylus now: ‘reception’ and public response
There are also sections on a summary of the stage-action in the trilogy of plays, notes on the text and translations, explanatory notes, bibliography and further reading, a chronology of Aeschylus’ life and times, family trees of the principal characters of the Oresteia and a map showing Greece and the Aegean Sea.
Following the texts of the plays, there are copious explanatory notes on the texts (over 100 pages of notes).

Apart from the very readable translations of the texts, the author has provided a wonderfully encompassing amount of information to make the reader’s experience of the Oresteia both worthwhile and entertaining, as well as eminently accessible. This edition is highly recommended.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Does the job, 11 May 2014
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This review is from: Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
Contains a good translation for each of the plays and is generally well set out inside. It has the standard introductions and character lists which are handy but doesn't really do anything differently from all the other translations out there.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Service package and delivery very good too., 4 Nov 2014
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This review is from: Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
A replacement for my old copy. Different translation to the one I taught from all those years ago but effective. Service package and delivery very good too.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A seminal work of literature, 12 July 2012
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
The Oresteia is not just a seminal work of European literature but also one of the founding texts of western theatre. The only complete trilogy still extant from classical Athens, the first play (Agamemnon) tells the story of Agamemnon's return from Troy and his murder by his unfaithful wife Clytemnestra.

The second play (The Libation Bearers) takes place years later when Agamemnon's children, Electra and Orestes, have to struggle with their consciences over whether to revenge their father by killing their mother.

The third plays (Eumenides) brings the trilogy to a conclusion as Orestes, pursued by the Furies for the crime of matricide, is brought to Athens and finally purified of his crime.

Dark, grim, compelling and poetic, this really will haunt you.
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Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics)
Oresteia (Oxford World's Classics) by Aeschylus (Paperback - 13 Nov 2008)
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