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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Translation in English, 29 Sep 2010
This review is from: The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
I could not fault this translation, it is absolutely brilliant, and is the best rendering in English I have seen by far. There are many translations of the Aeneid around, and a poor translation can make the difference between finishing the book or giving up after a few pages: it can even seem like a different work entirely. If you want the Aeneid in English, get this one, it is the nearest to experiencing Virgil's verse you will find.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As epic and entertaining as any of Homer's works, 26 May 2013
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
If you've enjoyed Homer's Iliad or Odyssey, you'll most likely enjoy Virgil's Aenid, too. Set, like the Odyssey, in the immediate aftermath of the fall of Troy, Virgil's epic poem tells how the Trojan hero, Aeneas, escapes from his burning city with a band of followers and journeys to Italy to found a new city. Although destined to succeed, he has a powerful enemy determined to hold him up. Juno, the goddess who bears a grudge against the Trojans, causes the weary troop to err around the Mediterranean for seven years.

Along their journey, the Trojans are washed up in a storm at Carthage, where Queen Dido falls in love with Aeneas. The episode ends tragically for the queen when Aeneas is commanded by the gods to continue his journey to the shores of the river Tiber, near what later becomes Rome. His welcome in Italy is short-lived. King Latinus offers him his daughter Lavinia in marriage, but Queen Amata prefers the local suitor, Turnus. Three mighty battles ensue, which Virgil describes in all their blood and gore. Aeneas' victory paves the way for his marriage to Lavinia and the foundation of the line of the Julii, whose descendants include Julius Caesar and Virgil's patron Augustus. The Aenid is an elaborate but entertaining justification of Augustus' reign and the violence he deployed to establish a peaceful empire.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful to read, 29 April 2013
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
As I am studying Virgil in Latin, it is a great pleasure to have the translation done by another poet
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4.0 out of 5 stars Eminently readable, 30 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
OK, aside from the impossibility of trying to keep track of all the characters referenced in the book, I found it very readable and not a chore at all. The end is very abrupt and left me wanting more but in some ways I guess that's a good sign. Whilst I wouldn't recommend it as a light read, if you have an interest in the ancient world centred around the mediteranean and maybe have read some Homer, this is a good follow-on.
I would suggest you read it as a novel and let it wash over you rather than trying work out who everyone is as you go.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing story, 24 July 2011
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This review is from: The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
I am a little concerned as to the correct pronunciation of the hero in this tale - Aeneus - as I am sure it has been the source of much laughter over the years in English society.

To be honest if Virgil was still alive I would seriously complain to him about this story; not for the content, but for the fact that it ended too soon.

The translation is easy to follow and does not seem to follow the poetic prose of many classical translations. You do need to get into a flow though as it doesn't seem to follow normal grammar rules. Possibly the best I have read for quite a few years.
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The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics)
The Aeneid (Oxford World's Classics) by Virgil (Paperback - 11 Sep 2008)
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