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on 2 June 2003
Gaddis' recent work on the Cold War has been somewhat hampered for many of the same reasons as most other Realists since the end of the Cold War. "We Now Know" makes big boasts that it doesn't entirely fulfil, but makes a cogent argument for laying the blame at the door of authoritarianism.
Fluidly written and deceptively deep post-revisionism is the order of the day, and there are few contemporary authors to rival Gaddis for sheer persuasiveness.
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on 5 September 2000
In the 1970s and '80s John Lewis Gaddis established a distinguished reputation as the leader of the post-revisionist school on the origins of the Cold War. Since then, sadly, his writing has been characterised by a drift towards the misguided stance of the Reaganite Right. In his latest work he has made a commendable early attempt to analyise the substantive new reaources made avaliable by the declassification of the Soviet archives. Yet his title "We Now Know" (a notion repeatedly asserted throughout this work) claims far too much. The new evidence has contributed to the debate on the Cold War but does not provide all the answers - indeed, how could they have done? A radically different set of conclusions could be drawn from the archival evidence than those that Gaddis's deeply conservative perspective leads him to. This is a useful contribution to the debate on the Cold War, therefore, but nobody should be deluded into thinking this is a definitive work. "We Now Know More" would have been a more accurate - if less catchy - title. We cannot expect all the arguments concerning the Cold War to be resolved at a stroke. The debate has a long way to run yet.
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on 14 May 1999
No, this book doesn't come too soon after the end of the Cold War. As Gaddis says at appropriate points, "we now know," suggesting we know much more and can evaluate much better than we could even at the end of the Cold War, but the "now" is just a temproary point. Obviously, we will eventually know more, perhaps much more. But, for now, Gaddis sheds new light on numerous events, and he does so in a serious but almost self-deprecating manner. For someone just plunging into the Cold War, this would be an excellent place to start. For those who lived through most of the Cold War as I did, and have studied it now and again, this work provides a wonderful reality check.
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on 13 July 1997
Mr Gaddis seems to have made a career of writing the same book eight times - new titles, references, but the same conclusion: everyone got it wrong but me.
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on 2 February 2016
Fantastically detailed. A must for any politics or modern history student
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on 21 November 2015
excellent
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on 7 December 2012
This is a must read book for anyone interested in the Cold War. It is without doubt the most objectively written and well researched book I have read on the subject.
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on 7 September 1997
Dr. Gaddis is one of the finest historians of his generation. This book tackles the hard work of looking at the Cold War in light of the flood of documents now available from the Soviet archives. It is a work of deep scholarship and Gaddis writes with style and clarity.

Anyone interested in foreign affairs should read this book
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on 22 March 2000
Gaddis has done it again. This time using recently released archives and resources, Gaddis synthesizes together cogent arguments about the Cold War. It is not just another re-hash of his old work but new compelling arguments about Stalin's role in the Cold War for example comes about. Do you know that Soviet troops raped more than 2 million women in East Germany?
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on 26 July 1998
To understand the beginnings of the Cold War and some of its major themes, this is the book to read. Its insights, analysis and documentation make it the single best book to date on the subject.
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