Customer Reviews


11 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars clear explanations
I bought this book to support some work I was doing for a level 5 diploma in teaching literacy. I looked at several books on this topic and found this one the best, not only for being up to date with a wide range of research ideas and theories, but also for explaining them coherently. Chapter 2, Explaining Second Language Learning, was particularly helpful. It also has a...
Published on 1 July 2009 by sora

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very general overview
A good read, but I felt like it touches upon important names and subjects just in passing. For teachers-to-be and students of linguistics I would rather recommend Introducing Second Language Acquisition by Saville-Troike, which I found better structured, explaining clearly the concepts and terminology of the field, as well as giving photos and short bios of the main...
Published on 2 April 2010 by Z. Eglite


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars clear explanations, 1 July 2009
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
I bought this book to support some work I was doing for a level 5 diploma in teaching literacy. I looked at several books on this topic and found this one the best, not only for being up to date with a wide range of research ideas and theories, but also for explaining them coherently. Chapter 2, Explaining Second Language Learning, was particularly helpful. It also has a useful section at the end challenging some popularly held misconceptions about language learning.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very general overview, 2 April 2010
By 
Z. Eglite (Riga, Latvia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
A good read, but I felt like it touches upon important names and subjects just in passing. For teachers-to-be and students of linguistics I would rather recommend Introducing Second Language Acquisition by Saville-Troike, which I found better structured, explaining clearly the concepts and terminology of the field, as well as giving photos and short bios of the main authors in the field.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reading as a Non-Teacher, 10 April 2009
By 
M. J. Holland (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
I, myself, am not a teacher (just a student) but found the content of this book suitably applicable to my A-Level English Language course. While not addressing in such a thorough manner the first language situation, it visits topics relevant to the course, and reaffirms one's knowledge in applying it to various situations. And well written too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clear well-written introduction which can be the basis for further research on the subject, 24 Jun 2012
This book is aimed at teachers involved with language learning, with focus on second language learning. This is an introduction whereby an overview is given of the research in this field, handily organized in chapters on subjects such as language learning in early childhood, second language learning, individual differences, learning and teaching in the classroom. Very interesting is the last chapter in which some popular ideas (misconceptions?) are shortly discussed.

The writers give a summary of research, they do not develop a specific thesis. The language is clear and familiarizes the reader with the specific terminology. At the end of each chapter is a list with suggestions for further reading. A long bibliography and a useful glossary can be found at the end of the book.

Despite the fact that a lot is covered, the clear message is that one specific teaching method will not do for all and this because of different aptitudes of the students. Teachers should take this account and vary their method.

My motivation to go through this book was slightly different: I wanted to know - and this on basis of the current knowledge in the field - what would be for me the most appropriate way to master on my own (with of course access to websites, books, dictionaries, CD's) a language which is quite different from the languages that I do speak and this without having the luxury - unlike a child who acquires his first language - to be daily exposed to it.

I did find it interesting to learn how language teaching has involved over time. I could also draw some practical conclusions: One has to be exposed in several ways to the language: one has to read as much as possible (reading seems to be the most appropriate way to increase one's vocabulary), listen to the language with the aim to become familiar with the intonation of the language (the correct pronunciation of each individual word is not that important for an easy comprehension by a native listener), interactivity with correcting feedback - if one has this opportunity - is the most efficient way to learn a language. Being actively using the language, for instance by talking and writing, helps to memorize structure and speeds up the acquisition of new vocabulary.

The book also motivated me to persevere: Learning a language can sometimes be a frustrating activity as one has the impression that one does not make any progress. This book did show that this is apparently a natural phenomenon of language acquisition: as one gradually internalises the rules which govern the language, one can make errors one did not make before. Whereas in the beginning the correct utterances were a mere aping of texts without a conscious or unconscious knowledge of the grammar, applying new grammatical rules inappropriately is a temporary phase in the acquisition of these rules.

Learning rules by the simple repetition of phrases is not the way to proceed. Motivation and the active use of the language are much more efficient.

The claim that one can only really learn a language at a very tender age is not backed up by research. It is a fact that the first language has to be learned before a certain age, however that young people seem to master a second language without an effort is simply not true: they rather have the privilege to be exposed to a huge quantity of the language. For older people this is mostly not the case.

Oh yes, the book: clear well-written introduction which can be the basis for further research on the subject.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Clear well-written introduction which can be the basis for further research on the subject, 24 Jun 2012
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
This book is aimed at teachers involved with language learning, with focus on second language learning. This is an introduction whereby an overview is given of the research in this field, handily organized in chapters on subjects such as language learning in early childhood, second language learning, individual differences, learning and teaching in the classroom. Very interesting is the last chapter in which some popular ideas (misconceptions?) are shortly discussed.

The writers give a summary of research, they do not develop a specific thesis. The language is clear and familiarizes the reader with the specific terminology. At the end of each chapter is a list with suggestions for further reading. A long bibliography and a useful glossary can be found at the end of the book.

Despite the fact that a lot is covered, the clear message is that one specific teaching method will not do for all and this because of different aptitudes of the students. Teachers should take this account and vary their method.

My motivation to go through this book was slightly different: I wanted to know - and this on basis of the current knowledge in the field - what would be for me the most appropriate way to master on my own (with of course access to websites, books, dictionaries, CD's) a language which is quite different from the languages that I do speak and this without having the luxury - unlike a child who acquires his first language - to be daily exposed to it.

I did find it interesting to learn how language teaching has involved over time. I could also draw some practical conclusions: One has to be exposed in several ways to the language: one has to read as much as possible (reading seems to be the most appropriate way to increase one's vocabulary), listen to the language with the aim to become familiar with the intonation of the language (the correct pronunciation of each individual word is not that important for an easy comprehension by a native listener), interactivity with correcting feedback - if one has this opportunity - is the most efficient way to learn a language. Being actively using the language, for instance by talking and writing, helps to memorize structure and speeds up the acquisition of new vocabulary.

The book also motivated me to persevere: Learning a language can sometimes be a frustrating activity as one has the impression that one does not make any progress. This book did show that this is apparently a natural phenomenon of language acquisition: as one gradually internalises the rules which govern the language, one can make errors one did not make before. Whereas in the beginning the correct utterances were a mere aping of texts without a conscious or unconscious knowledge of the grammar, applying new grammatical rules inappropriately is a temporary phase in the acquisition of these rules.

Learning rules by the simple repetition of phrases is not the way to proceed. Motivation and the active use of the language are much more efficient.

The claim that one can only really learn a language at a very tender age is not backed up by research. It is a fact that the first language has to be learned before a certain age, however that young people seem to master a second language without an effort is simply not true: they rather have the privilege to be exposed to a huge quantity of the language. For older people this is mostly not the case.

Oh yes, the book: clear well-written introduction which can be the basis for further research on the subject.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars good book, 6 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
good for language teachers to look, suggested by my tutor, useful book
layout not very attractive, sometimes difficult to read but good book
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Fine, 7 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
The book arrived quickly and in perfect shape so I have nothing to complain about or to say about this order
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 11 Aug 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
A readable and thorough exploration of the different theories of language acquisition and the impact of this knowledge on how to teach language. Very interesting and relevant.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars good basic reference, 29 Nov 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
i like this book because it is between linguisitics and education very good even for general reading for someone who is interesred in linuisitics
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars review, 23 July 2009
By 
J. M. Flynn - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers) (Paperback)
Excellent book.It has been fully updated to include latest developments in the linguistics field, relevant to English as an Additional Language as well as Modern Foreign Language teaching and TESOL. An essential reference and coursebook.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

How Languages are Learned (Oxford Handbooks for Language Teachers)
£19.80
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews