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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic introduction
The "A Very Short Introduction" series doesn't always come up with good books, but this one is a gem. It really is. It introduces the basics first: deduction, induction, etc. and goes on to talk about the problem of induction, Hume's criticism of it, whether thinking about probability and causation can help. The discussion moves then onto realists vs...
Published on 10 April 2006 by filthmonkey

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12 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Reasonable Overview For The Interested
What do philosophers think about science? This book provides a brief history of the philosophy of science, describes some logical assumptions in the practice of science and problems in science, and discusses Thomas Kuhn's scientific revolutions. The book concludes with a discussion on science and society.
Philosophy of science, as described in this book, seems to...
Published on 19 Jan 2006 by Kam-Hung Soh


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great Introduction, 16 Jun 2009
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Stewart M (Victoria, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Paperback)
It's tempting to ask why we need to have a better understanding of the philosophy of Science, when it can be said that "Science is what Scientists do" - it's a broad field of study and can any single definition cover all the bases? I think the answer to this question lies in the growth of "pseudo- science" - be it intelligent design or some aspects of alternative medicine and such like. If we want to be able to identify what is not science, we need to be able to understand what Science actually is. On that basis this book is an excellent starting point for such an understanding.
This book provides an excellent over-view of the major developments and theoretical aspects of the Philosophy of Science and provides a well laid out and accessible introduction to the subject. As the name of the series suggests there is no intention in the book to provide either a definitive or entirely comprehensive account of the contested field of Science philosophy. There seems to be little need for much prior knowledge of science as a body of content before reading this book, and this helps in its general tone.
As an introductory text on the subject it's hard to fault - and the bibliography will direct the reader to more in depth reading if required.
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12 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Reasonable Overview For The Interested, 19 Jan 2006
By 
Kam-Hung Soh "Software Salariman" (Melbourne, Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Paperback)
What do philosophers think about science? This book provides a brief history of the philosophy of science, describes some logical assumptions in the practice of science and problems in science, and discusses Thomas Kuhn's scientific revolutions. The book concludes with a discussion on science and society.
Philosophy of science, as described in this book, seems to have become a rather esoteric subject removed the daily practice of scientists and the everyday use of science. Some questions that spring to mind but which are not covered in this book: Does the publication and independent verification of results lead to the self-correcting nature of science? Why is the simplest explanation the best? How can scientists who cannot easily perform experiments, such as astronomers and sociologists, make verifiable theories?
Chapter 6 presents three problems in science: Newton's view of absolute space, the classification (by feature or by genetics) of living creatures and the whether the mind is modular or not. It's not clear to me how the philosophy of science can help in resolving these problems. Newton's view was probably driven by his desire to prove the literal truth of the Bible. In this day and age of automated indexing systems, does it really matter which method is used to classify creatures? Finally, shouldn't scientists collect more data before deciding if the mind is modular or not?
This book covers a number of topics in the field but fortunately doesn't get bogged down in a deep technical discussion on any single topic. It is a reasonable overview of the topic for the interested reader and one of the better books in the "Very Short Introduction" series.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Written in simple terms..., 15 Sep 2011
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S. MOHAMADI (London,SW) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Paperback)
Another great very short introduction.Samir Okasha has the gift of writing in simple terms and explaining complex ideas in layman's language. Highly recommended. I wish he had authored more books.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good choice if you don't have any background on Philosophy, 6 Jan 2011
This review is from: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Paperback)
I haven't had any background in Philosophy but I had to study it in the master. So I read this book and it helped me know every fundamental knowledge in Philosophy. It explains very understandably and easily for someone who doesn't have any idea about it to think about Philosophy critically. So far, I recommend this book to you.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Appetizer, 1 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Paperback)
I know the title reads as "A Very Short Introduction.." but neverthless this book should in my opinion be less ..short.However what is presented almost on an "Abstracts" form is very interesting and makes you long for further reading.

Francisco Amaral
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fine jaunt through the philosophy of science, 24 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Paperback)
A fine jaunt through the philosophy of science, but I didn't find it very engaging. Can't really pinpoint why though and maybe its just a matter of personal taste.
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