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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new classic
Having read and re-read the original many times as a child, I was thrilled to hear of the imminent release of an officially-sanctioned sequel assuming it wouldn't be allowed if it wasn't good. I know little of Geraldine McCaughrean's writing having read only one of her other books so far (Stop the Train - which is truly fantastic), though I know her outstanding reputation...
Published on 23 Oct 2006 by ELH Browning

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Peter Pan in Scarlet by Geraldine McCaughrean
Also posted to Miss Inga Page.

Peter Pan in Scarlet is the official "sequel" to J.M. Barrie's 1911 classic novel. Written by Geraldine McCaughrean, following a competition run by Great Ormond Street Hospital, the novel deals with the adventures of the "Lost Boys" as they are drawn back into Neverland. However, the "Lost Boys" are now men, living and working in...
Published 14 months ago by Miss Inga Page


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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new classic, 23 Oct 2006
By 
ELH Browning "Esther-Lou" (Kingston Bagpuize, Oxon) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Hardcover)
Having read and re-read the original many times as a child, I was thrilled to hear of the imminent release of an officially-sanctioned sequel assuming it wouldn't be allowed if it wasn't good. I know little of Geraldine McCaughrean's writing having read only one of her other books so far (Stop the Train - which is truly fantastic), though I know her outstanding reputation so I expected a great read. And yes, I got it.

The classic Peter Pan tale includes a full compliment of childhood imagery (mermaids, pirates and red indians) and would be a hard job to follow so I had wondered what new elements could be brought in to make this sequel original in its own right. The Lost Boys and Wendy and John are now grown-up and have families of their own, yet all are aware through too-vivid dreams of deeply-disturbing alterations to Neverland, and so they decide they must return to see what they can do to set it right for Peter and their own sakes. There's a theme running through of how wearing another person's clothes helps you be that person, and this adventure begins with the grown-ups squeezing themselves into the clothes of their children to regress to their own childhoods to enable them to return to Neverland. With Peter Pan at the helm, they become explorers following an old Treasure map of Captain Hook's to the top of Neverpeak Mountain. There's intrigue and danger along the way intertwined with the mysterious Ravello with his travelling circus animals. There's also plenty of action with fighting factions of fairies, a maze of witches, roaming men who were once lost-boys but lost their way in Neverland, and a battle across sinking sand.

The book is beautifully packaged in vivid red with evocative and striking silhouettes at the start of each chapter. The cover has a lovely bold image of Peter and the male fairy, Fireflyer, against a fiery lagoon and scarlet sky. This is perfectly apt as Neverland is no longer a lush green garden of adventure, the strong autumn colours reflecting the dangerously-changing times and that there's fire at the heart of Neverland. The ending is expected in the main, Wendy and the Original Lost Boys returning to their London families, but the door to Neverland never shuts and anything could happen......

I found this book to be largely true to the original with evocative descriptive language and sophisticated imagery. The tale is in many ways enchanting, appealing to the spirit of eternal youth, yet it's underscored with a dark ripcord. There's the sinister villain and the hero who is himself flawed. There's the anger of the Roarers, the grief of the mothers who lost those lost boys and, in the background, the scars of World War 2.

Oh yes, I think JM Barrie would heartily approve of this sequel. High praise indeed.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Marvelous!, 27 Oct 2006
By 
kehs (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Hardcover)
I wasn't sure if I would enjoy this, after all, how could anyone compare to the wonderful J M Barrie? However, McCaughrean really pulled out all the stops and did a marvelous job with this sequel. She found a nifty way of getting the original characters back to Neverland and introduces some wonderful new faces too. The story still has some dark moments, but much less violence than the original, and some marvelous twists as well - like the changes that befall Tootle! All in all, this was a very pleasant surprise and one that I enjoyed immensely.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Journey Back to Neverland..., 23 Oct 2006
This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Hardcover)
Everybody around the world will be familiar with Peter Pan, Wendy, Captain Hook and their dream-like habitat, Neverland. The book 'Peter Pan' is timeless and always, always enchanting, however many times you read it. The masterpiece, written by J.M.Barrie during his stay in Great Ormond Street Hospital, never fails to thrill and delight children and adults alike. A lot of you may think that the novel is magical on its own, and that a sequel, written by another author many years later, sounds stupid and unecessary. Therefore I would not be surprised if many readers give this new book, 'Peter Pan in Scarlet', a miss.

The book begins very well, with the Darlings (Wendy, John and the adopted Lost Boys) finding that dreams, very real dreams, are leaking out of Neverland. They have a feeling that something is wrong in Neverland, so decide to venture back to the place of everlasting childhood. But how can they try to fly back to Neverland, when they are no longer adults, but have children of their own? I will leave you to find out...

Although I feel the story rambles a little during the middle, the ending is luxuriously concocted in a way which I feel Barrie would be proud of. Remember, when buying this book, proceeds are going to Great Ormond Street Hospital - a worthy cause of a worthy book.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Return of Pan's People, 5 Nov 2006
By 
Mrs. T. Mannell "mannelltoni" (hampshire, england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Hardcover)
I was looking forward to the sequel to Peter Pan, having enjoyed the book many many times from childhood into adulthood, and also loving anything "Pan".

I wasn't disappointed either. Geraldine does a fantastic job in getting the now grown children back to childhood and back to Neverland.

She's woven a mystical, magical storyline, bringing old characters back to life, and weaving the old with the new. Peter Pan has lost none of his childish arrogance, and Wendy none of her caring, mothering nature.

New elements have been cleverly interspersed with the older fabric of the original and I really enjoyed the book.

Good on you Geraldine, you had the courage to write the sequel, and you've pulled it off.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new classic, 4 Dec 2007
By 
ELH Browning "Esther-Lou" (Kingston Bagpuize, Oxon) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Paperback)
Having read and re-read the original many times as a child, I was thrilled to hear of the imminent release of an officially-sanctioned sequel assuming it wouldn't be allowed if it wasn't good. I know little of Geraldine McCaughrean's writing having read only one of her other books so far (Stop the Train - which is truly fantastic), though I know her outstanding reputation so I expected a great read. And yes, I got it.
The classic Peter Pan tale includes a full compliment of childhood imagery (mermaids, pirates and red indians) and would be a hard job to follow so I had wondered what new elements could be brought in to make this sequel original in its own right. The Lost Boys and Wendy and John are now grown-up and have families of their own, yet all are aware through too-vivid dreams of deeply-disturbing alterations to Neverland, and so they decide they must return to see what they can do to set it right for Peter and their own sakes. There's a theme running through of how wearing another person's clothes helps you be that person, and this adventure begins with the grown-ups squeezing themselves into the clothes of their children to regress to their own childhoods to enable them to return to Neverland. With Peter Pan at the helm, they become explorers following an old Treasure map of Captain Hook's to the top of Neverpeak Mountain. There's intrigue and danger along the way intertwined with the mysterious Ravello with his travelling circus animals. There's also plenty of action with fighting factions of fairies, a maze of witches, roaming men who were once lost-boys but lost their way in Neverland, and a battle across sinking sand.
The book is beautifully packaged in vivid red with evocative and striking silhouettes at the start of each chapter. The cover has a lovely bold image of Peter and the male fairy, Fireflyer, against a fiery lagoon and scarlet sky. This is perfectly apt as Neverland is no longer a lush green garden of adventure, the strong autumn colours reflecting the dangerously-changing times and that there's fire at the heart of Neverland. The ending is expected in the main, Wendy and the Original Lost Boys returning to their London families, but the door to Neverland never shuts and anything could happen......
I found this book to be largely true to the original with evocative descriptive language and sophisticated imagery. The tale is in many ways enchanting, appealing to the spirit of eternal youth, yet it's underscored with a dark ripcord. There's the sinister villain and the hero who is himself flawed. There's the anger of the Roarers, the grief of the mothers who lost those lost boys and, in the background, the scars of World War 2.
Oh yes, I think JM Barrie would heartily approve of this sequel. High praise indeed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Different!, 22 Jan 2008
This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Paperback)
Summary
This story is set after all our favourite characters have grown up and even one of our friends has died in war. Unfortunately, Peter doesn't recognise Wendy or the boys, at the start of the story when they first return to Neverland, and there are no new Lost girls and boys because the have either been killed by Peter or they have been banished off the island.

Favourite and worst things
My favourite part of the book is the character Firefly the fairy because he is boastful but really funny. The worst thing is that the Wendy Hut is now up at the top of a tree and breaks so Peter gets angry leading him to blame all the guests (Wendy and the boys) and is really unfair to them.

Ratings and recommendations
I would rate this book 7/ 10. I would recommend this book to 8 - 12 year olds who enjoyed the Peter Pan book by J.M Barrie.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Peter Pan in Scarlet by Geraldine McCaughrean, 30 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Paperback)
Also posted to Miss Inga Page.

Peter Pan in Scarlet is the official "sequel" to J.M. Barrie's 1911 classic novel. Written by Geraldine McCaughrean, following a competition run by Great Ormond Street Hospital, the novel deals with the adventures of the "Lost Boys" as they are drawn back into Neverland. However, the "Lost Boys" are now men, living and working in London... and getting back into Neverland as adults is much more difficult than they had previously thought - and that's not to mention staying in Neverland once they are there!

This novel is SO beautifully written. Picking just one quote for Fragment Friday was a real challenge, because there were so many passages that were so poetic! I really loved watching as the "Lost Boys" prepared for their journey into Neverland. The idea that putting on children's clothing could make them children once more, and therefore transport them into Neverland is, yes, unrealistic, but absolutely inspired! Even more so is the way that one "Lost Boy" gets around the fact that he has no appropriate clothing to put on, and must find another way of reaching his inner child. The "Lost Boys" were definitely my favourite characters in this story, and I thought that the subplots involving the different members of the group were so much more entertaining (and didactic) than the central quest plot concerning Peter and the Ravelling Man. I genuinely cared about each and every one of them, and think that the story really benefited from their presence. I would have liked to have seen some more of the characters from the original, however. Tinkerbell is someone that I particularly missed: Fireflyer simply wasn't an adequate replacement.

However, whilst I adored the minor characters in this book, I really had a problem with the character of Peter Pan. There was absolutely no magic! He is so full of angst and whines too much for a character in a novel aimed at children. He seemed to completely lack the charm that Barrie's Peter had, and felt more like an old man trapped in a child's body than anything else. Perhaps, this is intentional, and his worsening attitude mirrors his experiences, but I found it uncomfortable to read.

It also really upset me to see how damaged Neverland had become. I would have preferred to read a novel set in a Neverland which was inkeeping with Barrie's original, but one which had a new threat. The original location worked perfectly for Barrie, and I think it would have been appropriate for the sequel, too. I, similarly, would have liked to have revisited some of the main locations of the original - Mermaid Lagoon in particular. Even with Peter acting the way he is, it would have been interesting, I think, to see how the Mermaids react to his changed attitude!

Advertised as a piece of Children's Fiction, I think this is the main issue that McCaughrean's sequel faces. Peter aside, the issues that are dealt with within are just a shade too dark for a child to deal with. McCaughrean frequently references death, both within and outside of Neverland, and her descriptions are too detailed to be glossed over. The plot, clear to an adult reader (and predictable, to some extent), has the propensity to become confusing for a child!

Most importantly, however, for a reason that I cannot put my finger on, I just couldn't motivate myself to pick this book up once I started. The plot is enjoyable enough, but it felt like such a slog to get through! I can't help but think that if I found it a bit boring, then a child would also lose interest!! If I had been more enthused by this book, it would definitely have had a higher rating, but given how long it took me to get through, I can't give it higher than three stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure magic, 15 July 2010
By 
Petra Bryce "bookworm" (Malvern, Worcs) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peter Pan in Scarlet (Paperback)
One of the best books I've read over the last few months (or even years), I can't sing its praises high enough. Brimming with imagination and invention, from the beginning it is not at all surprising when, after having dreamt of Neverland, things like cutlasses and a quiver of arrows are left behind in the bed next morning, or that fairies hatch out of a baby's first laugh. I loved the fact how Geraldine McCaughrean portrayed the now grown-up Darling children and their adopted brothers, once the Lost Boys, as slightly ridiculous, by writing their appointment to fly to Neverland into their diaries (on a Sunday, so that children would not need to be collected from school), by having them chase after flying insects in the park in their search for fairies or by having them squeeze into their own children's clothing in order to become children again themselves. Once there, the reader is immediately transported into this magical land together with the characters, where they turn the Wendy House into the Trans-Sigobian Express and drink Bovril from a samovar. But all is not well in Neverland, and there is a definite dark undercurrent running through the book, just enough to add mystery and excitement to the narration. Humour is provided in the shape of Firefly, a mischievous and very hungry fairy, and the respectable Judge Tootles, who, having only daughters, had to put on a smocked party dress and ballet shoes and turn into a girl. There are so many wonderful images in this book, written in beautiful, evocative prose, that I could go and on. The author has got so much to say about the nature of childhood and of growing up, of friendship and love, yet it is done so subtly and skilfully that the book's profundity never interferes with characterization or plot development but is always perceived as a natural extension of it. I read this book to my 7-year-old son, and I've never seen him so eager for me to read just one more page, one more chapter; he still calls this book one of his absolute favourites. Together with David Wyatt's illustrations, this book is a joy to read and I, for once, have to concur with the Mail on Sunday in calling it "a little masterpiece". This book will enrich your life and you will treasure it forever.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Peter Pan in Scarlet-Illustrated Edition, 23 Nov 2013
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The only problem I found with this is that it's an adapted version. It's a lot shorter that the original which I wasn't expecting.
Aside from that its a beautiful copy and the presentation is amazing! Such good value for the price.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended, 8 Jun 2013
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Fantastic book for the transition between the level of children's books and teens. Peter Pan is back in a story which will have you pulled in to find out more about the plot with some moments where you will cry about the transition from childhood to adulthood. Set in post world war 1 Britain; the story is thoughtfully set out about the change of times and how that affects certain aspects of the book.
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Peter Pan in Scarlet
Peter Pan in Scarlet by Geraldine McCaughrean (Paperback - 4 Oct 2007)
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