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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Little Classic
I first read this almost thirty years ago as part of my French A Level course. I have read it every couple of years ever since. It has always been one of my favourite all time books. Is it a childrens' or a grown up's book. Who cares? It speaks to everyone.
It is the simple tale of a pilot who is grounded in the desert and meets the enigmatic Prince who has come from...
Published on 2 Oct. 2003 by S. Cornforth

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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars a review of five translations
The Little Prince Nov./14

A review of five translations

In 2000, the Richard Howard translation of The Little Prince was released to supercede the original of Katherine Woods from 1943. When a publisher comes to one to translate such a classic how does one ever turn them down and say the last translation was good enough! I guess one doesn't. Money...
Published 7 months ago by John Lederman


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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Little Classic, 2 Oct. 2003
By 
S. Cornforth "Steve Cornforth" (Liverpool, UK England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I first read this almost thirty years ago as part of my French A Level course. I have read it every couple of years ever since. It has always been one of my favourite all time books. Is it a childrens' or a grown up's book. Who cares? It speaks to everyone.
It is the simple tale of a pilot who is grounded in the desert and meets the enigmatic Prince who has come from another planet. A tiny planet inhabited by the Prince and his beloved flower - and the constant fear of Baobab trees which could overwhelm everything. It is so small that he once watched 44 sunsets. He watches these when he is sad. How sad he must have been on that day observes the narrator. It is a beautiful story about friendship. We laugh as much as we cry. The author's drawing of the empty landscape after his friend's departure still chokes me.
But there is also the humour. Normally at the expense of our bizarre adult world. The Prince meets a merchant who sells a pill that means there is no need to drink. This could save several minutes each day. The Little Prince observes that if he had that time he would go to a fountain and have a nice cool drink.
St. Exupery is much loved in France. He was even on the money before the Euro arrived. This is much deserved for this little classic alone. Read it in English or French or whatever you like. But read it - now.
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69 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unforgettable, heart-warming story, 14 April 2004
By 
Break (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Possibly the most beautiful book of the twentieth century, the Little Prince will appeal to the hearts of adults and children alike. It tells the story of a little prince, who falls to earth from a star, and of the airman, stranded in the desert by the crash of his place, who seeks to understand the prince's secret. The premise is simple and the story simply told, and yet Saint-Exupery creates a tale that is full of poignancy and hope.
As the little prince journeys the planets around his own home, Asteroid B612, he encounters a variety of individuals: the Conceited Man, the King, the Accountant, the Drunkard, the Geographer and the Lamplighter. Each one becomes a parable of human nature: or rather, the nature of adults. The Little Prince is a story about childhood, mortality (made all the more poignant by the fact that Saint-Exupery died in action in WW2, the year after the book's publication), friendship, love, hope and the magic in our lives that we are at risk of losing as we grow older. For me it held enormous personal emotional value.
If you can manage to read it in the original French then by all means do, but any translation still conveys some of the treasure in Saint-Exupery's words. Personally I recommend the Wordsworth Children's Classics edition for its translation, if not the poorly reproduced illustrations, but I think I may just have a personal bias for the first edition I read.
For a so-called 'children's book,' this is one that will live with you for the rest of your life.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars a review of five translations, 23 Nov. 2014
The Little Prince Nov./14

A review of five translations

In 2000, the Richard Howard translation of The Little Prince was released to supercede the original of Katherine Woods from 1943. When a publisher comes to one to translate such a classic how does one ever turn them down and say the last translation was good enough! I guess one doesn't. Money and ego prevail.

But `good enough' is the debating point. Is it good enough? Howard writes in his preface "...it must be acknowledged that all translations date." Do they? Would one clean up and modernise the language of A.A. Milne in Winnie-the-Pooh? or of Kenneth Grahame in the Wind In The Willows? Of course not. Then Howard modernises Katherine Woods' rendition, "cry" with his "weep" during the departure from the fox. And he thinks this is more `modern?' What self-contradictory nonsense translators can write to justify themselves and their publishers.

I grew up on Katherine Woods' translation and prefer it over the Howard, but I must admit, when I look at my French copy, the Woods too has some elisions in translation. During the farewell from the fox, she translates: "It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important." Howard translates: "It's the time you spent on your rose that makes your rose so important." The French actually states: "C'est le temps que tu as perdu pour ta rose qui fait ta rose si importante." Literally this translates far more meaningfully and philosophically than either of the Woods or the Howard as "It is the time which you have lost for your rose which makes your rose so important." So that leaves me thinking both translations have their flaws. I am not sure why both of them would dilute the original like they have, for it has surely been diluted from what St. Exupery wrote and intended, but the Woods translation is very close to St. Exupery's text and meaning and brings a layer to think about beyond merely "spent" time.

From 2011 another translation is on the scene, by Ros and Chloe Schwarz, and it needs comment too. First of all, the illustrations: it is anything but sensitively rendered as its publicity blurb asserts. The colors have been filled in like old cellular film animation, and are just flat, losing St. Exupery's delicate drawing and watercolour washes. The hunter, as another example, has had circles drawn completely around his eyes now making him look like a goth caricature. The drawing of the fox in his lair has completely lost all the grass that was so delicately drawn by St. Exupery. The beautiful sense of all his drawings, that they flowed, without borders, right off the page, conveying their own meaningful addition to this borderless story, has been lost on many many of the drawings by the illustrator putting boxes around drawings that don't originally have any. The boa constrictor for instance. The sheep, for instance. Here the baobab trees and the weeding of Asteroid B-612 are now set against the dark background of space, not the daylight of the originals. The tiger no longer looks fearsome; it looks like a cute questioning pussycat, its line-work tampered with as it has been on most of the drawings. This illustration tampering is unforgiveable and reason alone not to buy this book.

The Schwarz translation has a third perspective on the French, but still, for example, loses the quote mentioned above from the fox. "Perdu pour" is translated here as "spent on" again. St. Exupery chose "perdu pour" for a reason; he did not write "passé," or any other verb. "Perdu pour" brings many other things, more layers of meaning, to mind. Then these translators do other things. They do things so blatantly wrong like alter his word "mouton" into "little lamb." If St. Exupery had meant little lamb he would have written "petit agneau" but he didn't. The little prince is not so dumb to not know little lambs grow up into bigger sheep. Also, in the geographer chapter, St. Exupery explains "ephemeral" as "menace de disparition prochaine," "a menace which disappears soon." The Schwarzs translate that phrase as "likely to die very soon." Clearly they completely don't get St. Exupery's thought and subtlety and at the same time possess the unbelievable arrogance to write words that St. Exupery did not.

They clearly don't have the soul of poets or philosophers ideally necessary, nor even the workman-like craft to simply translate what is there. Their approach to translation, like Howard's is unforgivable, and is another reason this book too should absolutely just sit on the rubbish heap until someone re-does it properly. The book itself is charming: tiny, hardcover, with gilt page edges and a ribbon marker. Full marks for being sturdy and beautifully portable, but otherwise... do yourself a favour and stay away from it too.

I recently found another translation of which I was unaware, from Alan Wakeman, 1995 (hardcover), illustrated from St. Exupery by Michael Foreman. Michael Foreman is one of my favourite illustrators and I have many of his books. Works in beautiful watercolours. I wondered. When it arrived I knew I was in for something special. Wakeman (he says in the preface), started translating in 1979, not under contract, but simply because he was not satisfied with the Katherine Woods' translation. He worked in his favourite retreat by the sea, overlooking the Golfe de Giens, which turned out, from the beginning discovery in 1993 of St. Exupery's sunken plane, to overlook the crash site in the sea where St. Exupery was lost. It took another decade or so to absolutely confirm that this is where St. Exupery went down, but Wakeman was apparently eerily in touch with something from St. Exupery through their labours of love.

Wakeman's translation is pretty accurate. He still translates "perdu pour" as "spent on," but okay. He translates "ephemere" as "doomed to disappear soon." Nice, and with a layer of fate the Schwarz's miss, but which Woods captures, albeit a bit more clumsily with "in danger of speedy disappearance." Wakeman has his quirks though. He translates "blé", the colour of the little prince's hair, as "corn." Technically correct, but an odd choice usually considered much more a secondary meaning to the more common one of "wheat." While a kernel of corn may be the colour of the little prince's hair, the kernels are not seen under the corn husks in a field of corn. The tassels, while colour correct, are overwhelmed in a corn field, especially from a fox's point of view, by all the green and are not really seen either. Wakeman seems to have never spent any time by a corn field to know that, unlike the fox who lives there, so Wakeman does not get that his quirky translation allusion is a stretch in reminding one of the little prince's hair colour. I find it rather a clash, or at the very least a break in the lovely flow St. Exupery spent so much time and talent composing, and work editing to create in his original work.

Foreman's illustrations are what is special about this Wakeman translation. All of the St. Exupery ones used, which is most of them, have been taken and re-worked. The line work and watercolour is far more skilful than St. Exupery, but extraordinarily faithful, and retains that childlike naiveté. It really takes a second look to realize it is not actually St. Exupery's line work with better color. All drawings have been given color, which brings a satisfaction absent from some, even in the original publication, where for example, I have been sorely tempted to pull out my own paint box for the little prince watching the sunset. This drawing is clearly a watercolour originally, but has only ever been published in black and white. (Why?) Here all the drawings are now shown in colour.

But where Foreman has really excelled is in introducing 8 beautiful full page or double page paintings of the little prince and the pilot: comforting the little prince when he was sad, walking with the little prince in his arms when exhausted to find water, sharing his drawings with the little prince, running with his revolver to kill the snake if he could... whole new enhancements to the story, bringing more forward the relationship that it was, not just story-telling about the little prince. For it is not just the story of a special individual, but also one of a special relationship, and the special place in our lives of special relationships and what makes them special.

The Woods translation is still head and shoulders above the new ones, except for the Wakeman. Both are far more evocative of what was intended. The Foreman illustrations with the Wakeman translation I think makes it even better. The Woods translation hardcover is now a collectors item and can often be very expensive and harder to find in the U.S. Easier in Britain (and isn't that a whole other very interesting essay on the lovely differences it indicates). The Woods edition appears to be available economically as a paperback (white cover, usually pre-2000 publishing date), but with no color illustrations.

The Howard translation, both hardcover and softcover (blue cover), both with color illustrations (and some black and white), is easily available at a quite reasonable price. The Schwarz translation is available in England and Canada easily, but hard to locate and has very poor notes on amazon.com. The Wakeman/Foreman collaboration (hardcover) can still be found used, in good shape, economical, for now, but also as a very expensive collectors item. (There are, I think, copyright issues until 2044; another interesting essay). I cannot vouch for the paperback version, publications of which often get cheap and sometimes are done with black and white illustrations only, like the Katherine Woods paperback and the Testot-Ferry translation (see below and see my review of Michael Foreman's Arthur High King Of Britain for more.).

My recommendation is buy the best available, the Wakeman/Foreman hardcover edition, or the Woods hardcover, (or both; each have their merits and shortcomings), and if your French is alright, get a French version too. It is worth working through Le Petit Prince. You will learn more about life and language and different cultures in doing so than in many larger weightier, more adult tomes and our children will too from this timeless story with so many layers and such depth in its simplicity.

The ratings:
Le Petit Prince: 5 stars
English translations to date:
Wakeman/Foreman: 4.5 stars
Woods: 4.25 stars
Howard: 1 star
Schwarz: 1 star
Testot-Ferry: 1 star

P.S.
I have also discovered there is enough of the Irene Testot-Ferry translation (Wordsworth) on the amazon "read inside" feature to render an opinion on it too. Cumbersome. Archaic, and not in a good way like the Katherine Woods. The Testot-Ferry is awkward, incorrect: e.g. "un peu," "a little," is translated as "more or less." "I flew more or less all over the world." Seems to lack the modesty intended by St. Exupery and the pilot here in the story which "a little" conveys. So she doesn't really get it. (And by the way, Wakeman leaves out "a little" completely. Rather a short-coming).

The Testot-Ferry translation is awkward. She opens a paragraph with: "As a result of which I have been in touch, throughout my life, with all kinds of serious people." for "J'ai ainsi eu, au cours de ma vie, des tas de contacts avec des tas de gens serieux." which more correctly and simply translates as "I have had, through the course of my life, lots of contact, with lots of serious people." Also, all the drawings in this edition are the most abysmal black and white hack reproductions. So avoid this translation despite its bargain basement price. You get what you pay for. There are better (more accurate) translations and more richness and layers of meaning in the Wakeman and the Woods translations, which are missing and awkward in the Testot-Ferry, and which such a classic piece of literature deserves.

P.P.S.
A recent comment elsewhere prompted this post script:
If you have a Cuffe translation of The Little Prince it too is very rare and likely will never be re-printed. The Wakeman edition is becoming such too, sadly. The reason for this is that the Little Prince fell out of copyright in England after fifty years, so Penguin and Pavillion, actually anticipating this, did the Cuffe version and the Wakeman version respectively. What they didn’t anticipate was that later in 1995 the UK harmonized its copyright law with the EU where copyright is 70 years and St. Exupery is allowed an additional 30 years due to his premature death in exceptional service to his nation and The Little Prince, like a handful of other titles, fell back into copyright there. Hence The Little Prince will not now fall out of copyright in Europe or England until 2045. This means, alas, likely no Folio Society edition or any other UK or European one for quite some time. In the U.S. of course, they ignore all this, and do their own thing, hence the Howard translation in 2000. Additionally, as I understand it, there are some differences among the family. St. Exupery’s birth family appears to have approved of the Wakeman translation, but St. Exupery’s wife Consuelo (and now her family), I believe, own the copyright, and my guess is, have a pretty strict and exclusive agreement with Harcourt Brace in North America. Why would HB not, for this incredible money-maker that most publishers would love a piece of. Which means yes, the Katherine Woods version is still available in England where it is beyond HB’s taste and control, thankfully.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good book but dismal edition, 9 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Yhe book is good and well worth reading and rereading, but this is not an atractive edition. Poor printing a dark black pictures so far from the original ones, The wrong format as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a beautiful, interesting little book! I wish I’d read this one sooner!, 12 Jan. 2015
Synopsis:

The story follows a little Prince who lives on a planet with a single flower, he decides to leave the comfort and safety of his planet and travel around the universe, he visits various planets before eventually reaching Earth, he meets an airplane pilot stranded in the desert and learns about life on Earth and the vagaries of adult life.

Review:

The Little Prince is a book that can be enjoyed at any age, but after having finished it I can’t help but think how interesting it would have been to read it as a child, purely enjoying the story of a little prince travelling from planet to planet. As an adult though, you can see plainly the moral questions Saint-Exupery is asking about life, and his cautionary advice towards adults becoming too absorbed in money and themselves - "Don't you see - I'm very busy with matters of consequence!" It offers many interesting comments about life as an adult, about taking things too seriously and not having enough time for love, family and really enjoying life, but instead being busy with matters of consequence - obtaining money etc.

Although these messages hardly sound like the stuff of children’s books, it is handled in a very sweet, simple way and the book has some very lovely interesting moments in it. It’s a really enjoyable story, one that seems to be loved and read again and again, no matter what age. There are some humorous moments in the story and such a unique way of looking at the lives of grown ups - through that of an alien child.

Coupled with the sweet little drawings that accompany the novel, it’s a real delight to read and something that can impart some real words of wisdom, no matter if you’re reading it for the first or the fifth time, or if you’re seven or seventy.It’s a book that I most certainly think I will return to, and a book that touches many people, it has so many great quotable lines “All grown-ups were once children... but only few of them remember it.” and it stands to reason that we could all do with being a bit more like children, and not take life too seriously.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book, 13 Aug. 2014
By 
Bacchus (Greater London - Surrey) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
My first encounter with this book was nearly 40 years ago when a teacher at my school lent me her copy. She said it was here favourite book and that it meant a great deal to her. I kept it for an evening and returned it the next day. Sadly I did not read it snd for years have felt vaguely guilty about this. Maybe because it meant so much to my teacher, the thought of my grubby schoolboy fingers harming such a beautiful book made me nervous of reading it. Besides, I thought it was a kid's book and I was 12.

Moving forward 16 years, I went to Paris for a holiday and visited the Pantheon (a place where France's most renowned men and women are buried) and saw Saint-Exupery's tomb underneath his aeroplane. Clearly he is a much loved writer in France.

Anyway, finally I have got round to reading the book and can understand the hold that it has on its readers. It is short and simple. A pilot lands in the desert because his aeroplane has broken down. There he meets a little prince who has arrived on earth from another planet. Over the course of a few days they have a series of oblique conversations in which the prince's childlike directness gradually cuts through the pilot's adult preoccupations and provides a kind of commentary on the human condition.

The simplicity of the book ensures a quick read but the messages are often profound. I liked the idea of taming, a word I had always thought of as breaking down of a person or animal's will. However, here it is about making a connection with another person.

This is a book to which I believe I will return to again.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timeless masterpiece, 30 Dec. 2002
By 
Mr C J Holm (East Boldon, Tyne and Wear United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This truly wonderful book should enchant people of all ages. The story is about an encounter between a stranded pilot and a golden-haired prince in the middle of the desert. The book is full of Saint-Exupery's wonderful insights into human nature and contains many delightful drawings which are both witty and moving. It only takes a short while to read, but once you're finished you will feel that you will never look at the world in the same way again. This really is one of the best books I have ever read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Little Prince, 22 July 2013
I was really disappointed in the format of the book - text was missing , the margins ran off the page with a huge space on the left hand side! although it was cheap I brought it for a foreign student and had to throw it away. Altogether very disappointing.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Little Prince, 23 Nov. 2010
I have always loved the story of the Little Prince and this pop up book follows the story with the same pictures, in the water colour washes of the original book. The pop ups beautifully enhance the story.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Thumbs down., 22 Oct. 2003
By 
E.L. Harris (Carlisle, Cumbria) - See all my reviews
This was a pricey mistake. I thought it couldn't fail to be well worth getting this as I knew The Little Prince as a priceless story. I got more and more disappointed and frustrated as I read this fancy-package anniversary edition. I found this version suprisingly bad and can't imagine why the publishers have produced it. Compared with the older version it's cold and leaden. If you know & love that other one, this one will almost certainly let you down. Just hasn't got the same joy, tension, tragedy, 'je ne sais quoi'. It's got a more matter-of-fact tone which for me became increasingly jarring; the other had a feel to it that made it more moving & endearing. Reading this translation was like discovering an imposter when I was expecting a dearest old friend
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