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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prepare to buckle your swash...
What can one say about this book? It has always been a favourite of mine since I first read it at the tender age of 12 some thirty years ago.

The characters have become some of the most famous in fiction (for reasons that will be obvious to anyone who has read this book) and the plot is driven forward with energy, humour and, dare I say, panache.

If...
Published on 31 July 2007 by Doctor Syn

versus
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the translation that it says in the description
This claims to be the translation by Richard Peavar, published in 2008, but it isn't. This is a translation by Lord Sudley, published in 1952. Check the preview before you buy - this might get fixed, I suppose.
Published 16 months ago by The Real Gareth Evans


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the translation that it says in the description, 3 Mar 2013
This claims to be the translation by Richard Peavar, published in 2008, but it isn't. This is a translation by Lord Sudley, published in 1952. Check the preview before you buy - this might get fixed, I suppose.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prepare to buckle your swash..., 31 July 2007
By 
Doctor Syn (Dymchurch-Under-The-Wall) - See all my reviews
What can one say about this book? It has always been a favourite of mine since I first read it at the tender age of 12 some thirty years ago.

The characters have become some of the most famous in fiction (for reasons that will be obvious to anyone who has read this book) and the plot is driven forward with energy, humour and, dare I say, panache.

If you want to devour a good book then sit back, read this and relish the company of M D'Artagnan, Athos, Porthos and Aramis.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not as advertised., 11 Aug 2013
Beware, this is not the Pavear translation as advertised. I have contacted Amazon and Penguin about this issue and nothing has been done to correct this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cut and Thrust..., 22 Nov 2012
By 
Dr. G. SPORTON "groggery1" (Birmingham UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Dumas' classic has much to recommend it; fabulous action scenes, complex plot twists and appealing characters racing about France (and occasionally England) in order to serve the great historical personages that determine their fates and their own sense of duty to them. If Dumas' book has a fault it is that the dramatist in him wins out over the novellist, and the last third of the book, particularly when Milady's influence begins to be truly felt, is often reduced to the episodes of a play rather than the complex internal dialogues and narrative observations of the earlier parts. The characters exist solely in terms of what they do and say, and whilst the ride is exhilarating, the effect is less impressive. But, a classic instruction manual for the young and noble, and makes you want to get out your epeé for the cut and thrust of musketeering.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 31 Dec 2010
By 
T. Edgeworth - See all my reviews
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The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas has been one of my favourite pieces of fiction for as long as I can remember, due to growing up watching the classic 1970's Richard Lester films and the 1993 Disney version. Until a few weeks ago, however, I had never actually read the original novel, having stupidly assumed that it would be a rather dated and dusty affair. Reading the first few pages quickly put my doubts to rest, and, having finished it, I now consider this book to be one of the best I have ever read.

The story describes how D'Artagnan, a young man who dreams of being musketeer, meets and befriends Athos, Porthos, and Aramis; the "three musketeers" of the title. The first half of the novel finds the four friends fighting to foil the scheming Cardinal Richelieu's efforts to discredit the queen, which he intends to do by bringing to light her affair with the Duke of Buckingham. The second half deals with the fallout from this adventure, as the musketeers race to put a stop to the evil ways of the mysterious, murderous Milady de Winter.

Action, Romance, Comedy, Tragedy; this book literally has everything. Also, Richard Pevear's excellent translation showcases Dumas' fantastically written dialogue and truly brings out the author's sense of humour (the scene in which a Athos repeatedly gambles away, wins back and loses his and a horrified D'Artagnan's posessions is very funny). Overall, a great read for anyone who enjoys a great read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heavyweight intrigue, romance & adventure, 7 Sep 2010
By 
LittleMoon (loving my life in the rain) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Apparently, when he was dying, Dumas said of death: "I shall tell her a story, and she will be kind to me." If it is so, then I assume he is lounging on a cloud with an entourage of angels to do his bidding, for Dumas in his lifetime was a consummate storyteller, and his particular brand of epic adventure is loved today by readers across the globe.

Dumas' novels are heavyweights, literally, and readers will have to contend with a lot of pages; these pages are filled with a lot of characters and events that though often convoluted, are always intriguing. In this first instalment, a young d'Artagnan sets out to join King Louis XIII's highly regarded Musketeers, only to find himself sword-to-sword with the eponymous "three": Porthos, Athos and Aramis. Meanwhile, Queen Anne of Austria, is having an affair with the Duke of Buckingham, and the scheming Cardinal Richelieu is determined to expose them... so begins a wild ride of murder, deception and secret assignations against the backdrop of 17th century England and France.

The loyalty of our four "heroes" is well known, and none can hear of the Three Musketeers without remembering "One for all, and all for one." Still, the musketeers are hardly ideal heroes, being essentially lazy, prone to eating and drinking, and doing little else except beating their servants and cavorting with their (various) women. Yet, it is their devotion and friendship that we ultimately remember them for, when it comes to each other, and their King, their honour knows no bounds.

Pitched against them is the formidable Milady de Winter, deceitful and beautiful, a lethal combination for many who cross her path, even before she is given, in the form of a note from her employer, carte blanche to murder. Her imprisonment and seduction of her jailer Felton provide one of the most memorable sections of the novel, and show Dumas at his most daring.

Readers used to contemporary fiction may find Dumas verbose, and slow to start... but give this novel a chance, and you will find yourselves hooked on the plot's machinations, depserate for the safety of our heroes and friends, and rushing onwards to discover their fate.

Note I: The Three Musketeers is part of a trilogy (published in English as a group of 5 novels) although reads perfectly well as a standalone. Those interested in the continuing fortunes of our aging foursome might like to follow them up in Twenty Years After (Wordsworth Classics), The Vicomte de Bragelonne (Oxford World's Classics), Louise de la Vallière (Oxford World's Classics), and finally, The Man in the Iron Mask (Wordsworth Classics).

Note II: Richard Pevear's is widely held to be the most faithful English translation of the text.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Bad translation :{, 28 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Very disappointed !! As it's published by Penguin, I did NOT expect this translation to be so DREADFUL.
( I only downloaded it to Kindle to replace my ancient, well-thumbed paperback, a Penguin Classic No.25, excellent translation by Lord Sudley, first published 1952. )
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5.0 out of 5 stars All For One And One For All, 24 Mar 2013
Not a thriller in Manila but one in seventeenth century Paris and it is fabulous. A rousing and rip-roaring chronicle of swashbuckling men thrusting spears into other duelists and of valorous and chivalrous noblemen risking all for friendship ("all for one"), love and Louis XIII. Harmless fun and much more entertaining than many a Hollywood caper. It's a veritable classic and should be on every reader's bookshelf (or Kindle).
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5.0 out of 5 stars A real classic, 27 Aug 2012
Mystery, action, romance, humour, intrigue, honour, friendship and above all lust. Lust for love, power, glory, revenge, it's all here and six hundred and fifty pages fly by in an instant. Perhaps it is Dumas' expertise in delivering a romp of a tale, or maybe the casual approach his characters have to life and death, more likely it is this revelry, a tale that whisks us away from the woes of today into a carefree world where for a brief time we can immerse ourselves in fantasy.
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3.0 out of 5 stars All hail the Joey Essex of 18th Century France, 3 April 2012
By 
Caterkiller (Darlington, UK) - See all my reviews
D'Artagnan doesn't seem like the brightest chap. He picks fights, squanders money, drinks and that is before he meets the equally bovine musketeers who are a trio intellectually on a par with Gazza, Peter Andre and Jimmy "Five Bellies". Then, partway through the book in a fit of passion D'Artagnan reveals his plans to Milday, the evil Cardinal's trusted assassin despite knowing she is plotting against musketeers. Needless to say there is a happy ending and molecule-brained D'Artagnan ends up being appointed a captain which probably explains the vast number of french military sucesses over the past few centuries. Not Dumas's best work, quite laboured and drawn out; I would strongly recommend Robin Buss's translation of "The Count of Monte Cristo" instead which is much more engaging despite being nearly twice as long.
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The Three Musketeers (Penguin Classics Deluxe Editions)
The Three Musketeers (Penguin Classics Deluxe Editions) by Alexandre Dumas (Paperback - 28 Aug 2007)
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