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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A victorious battle of words
In "A Terrible Love of War", Hillman examines war in a manner analogous to a psychologist working to understand the pathological behaviour of a person in depth therapy. This approach takes us on a engaging and extremely challenging journey into the archetype of war. On the way we meet famous men of battle, we rediscover the Greek gods Ares and Aphrodite (Mars and Venus),...
Published on 19 May 2004

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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pax!
There are two things we all know about war - one is that it is odious, the other that it comes naturally to us. A book on war should *start* from these premises; Hillman cannot get beyond them (he spends several pages telling us that peace is simply the absence of war, as if everything, including life itself and this planet, were not transitional). Despite this being the...
Published on 10 April 2011 by Simon Barrett


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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A victorious battle of words, 19 May 2004
This review is from: A Terrible Love of War (Hardcover)
In "A Terrible Love of War", Hillman examines war in a manner analogous to a psychologist working to understand the pathological behaviour of a person in depth therapy. This approach takes us on a engaging and extremely challenging journey into the archetype of war. On the way we meet famous men of battle, we rediscover the Greek gods Ares and Aphrodite (Mars and Venus), we catch a transferential glimpse at Hillman the man in some autobiographical "confessions", and finally come face to face with the war monger within the sacrificial lamb of God. It's confronting because Hillman makes no attempt to "explain" war, but leads us instead to understand it and the dark role it plays in our psyches, individually and collectively. It's a book that will reward careful and considered reading. I'm sure you will revel in his rhetoric, see the myth in his madness, and most of all, admire Hillman's unique approach to this most challenging subject, as I have.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A victorious battle of words, 19 May 2004
By 
Peter FYFE (Erskineville, Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Terrible Love of War (Hardcover)
In "A Terrible Love of War", Hillman examines war in a manner analogous to a psychologist working to understand the pathological behaviour of a person in depth therapy. This approach takes us on a engaging and extremely challenging journey into the archetype of war. On the way we meet famous men of battle, we rediscover the Greek gods Ares and Aphrodite (Mars and Venus), we catch a transferential glimpse at Hillman the man in some autobiographical "confessions", and finally come face to face with the war monger within the sacrificial lamb of God. It's confronting because Hillman makes no attempt to "explain" war, but leads us instead to understand it and the dark role it plays in our psyches, individually and collectively. It's a book that will reward careful and considered reading. I'm sure you will revel in his rhetoric, see the myth in his madness, and most of all, admire Hillman's unique approach to this most challenging subject, as I have.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pax!, 10 April 2011
By 
Simon Barrett "Il penseroso" (london, england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Terrible Love of War (Hardcover)
There are two things we all know about war - one is that it is odious, the other that it comes naturally to us. A book on war should *start* from these premises; Hillman cannot get beyond them (he spends several pages telling us that peace is simply the absence of war, as if everything, including life itself and this planet, were not transitional). Despite this being the purest psychbabble, Hillman is more earthbound than he thinks.
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A Terrible Love of War
A Terrible Love of War by James Hillman (Paperback - 4 Feb 2008)
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