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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars like being tickled with a cheese grater
God knows I tried my best to learn the ways of this world, even had inklings we could be glorious...
...but Vernon Little's small-town dreams are literally shot to pieces when his confused best friend massacres the teenagers who cruelly persecuted him, before turning the gun on himself and taking the truth with him. Vernon has an alibi, but it's just not good enough...
Published on 28 Aug 2005 by Mis Jenner

versus
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Life as a game show
Parts of this book reveal genuine originality and even the odd spark of genius; other parts, however, show an author a little too much in love with his own self-conscious quirkiness, jemmying in supposedly killer one-liners on every page. The upshot is that the biting satire on the needy, corrupt insincerity of uncaring aspirational middle-class American society is...
Published on 12 Jan 2007 by G. L. Haggett


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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars like being tickled with a cheese grater, 28 Aug 2005
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
God knows I tried my best to learn the ways of this world, even had inklings we could be glorious...
...but Vernon Little's small-town dreams are literally shot to pieces when his confused best friend massacres the teenagers who cruelly persecuted him, before turning the gun on himself and taking the truth with him. Vernon has an alibi, but it's just not good enough for a nation desensitized by the drama of CNN, and begins to realise that the American public need a bit of relish with their truth to stop it sticking in their throats. It ain't what you say, it's whether it comes with flashing neon and a free gift.
DBC Pierre's biting satire is of Big Mac proportions, spanning such diverse issues as justice, the ever-increasing power of the media, and the sordid secrets of humanity that so-called Western civilisation cannot bury, with an irreverence that belies the sharp insights. Pierre sculpted the ideal character for us to follow through these troubled times; Vernon Little may not be the cleverest person around, but he stumbles on 'learnings' that come closer to the truth about what makes us humans behave in the loving, violent way we do, than anything you can find in a textbook. Vernon is a character we as young adults can all identify with; he still carries an almost naive belief that people are essentially good, but cannot quite reconcile that belief with the events happening around him.
The rest of the cast in this 'reality-documentary' are surreal. Believe they are caricatures if you want, but I can see these people around us every day. Vernon's mother is a clingy, disillusioned woman, sliding hysterically into middle-age without having achieved anything in her life. She tries to make up for this by boasting to her friends about her new fridge while hiding the mounting electricity bills, and dieting between trips to Bar-B-Chew Barn. Eulalio Ledesma is the sleazy reporter who worms his way into the family only to wrench it apart with his 'exclusives', but has a hidden past of his own. Then there's the creepy psychiatrist with steel salad tongs, the divine Taylor Figueroa and others from the slightly warped imagination of DBC Pierre.
The author, it seems, can dig up both the crass and the charming within people, and is not afraid to plunge in and find it, then come back and tell it to us straight. The book is fantastically well-constructed, with plot twists that will knock you over then jump up and down on you. The story never takes back seat to any message that Pierre is trying to send us, which means you can read it on many levels. Much of what he finds will shatter your faith in humanity, but hold on - it emerges triumphant! We track Vernon as he moves from being a boy that things happen to, a victim of his own circumstances, through being a criminal on the run, and finally as he becomes Vernon God Little, who knows the secret of life...
All in all, this is an astounding first novel, and fully deserved to win the Man BOOKER Prize, the Whitbread Best First Novel Award, and the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Award for Comic Writing, all in 2003, despite it being a rather irregular choice. Take note all - this could be the handle of a mop..
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vernon, it was really nothing, 12 Nov 2003
By 
John Ault (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
It is ironic that a Booker winning book is written entirely in an American voice, when - of course - Americans cannot enter. I suspect that there are niggles with unauthentic American references, just as there are wrinkles in the book generally. However, it is a great book with a narrator who is both frustratingly naive and deeply knowing. It draws the reader in, makes us care, and keeps us dangling until the end.
I wonder if this is how Donna Tartt would sound if she had a really firm editor? There is the same sense of mystery, and some of the same low life Americans, but much punchier pacing.
The other great thing about the book is that it is littered with genuinely funny puns. Don’t worry about the hype, don’t worry about the implausibility of the author, just let yourself laugh and cry with Vernon.
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44 of 50 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars U . S . EH???, 14 Jan 2003
By 
MR A HEPWORTH (Castleford, West Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Hardcover)
I really couldn't wait to dive into this book. I admit I was a little giddy from all of those glowing comparisons I'd heard in the press: 'The Simpsons meet The Osbournes en route to Eminem," all of that tantalising praise seemed to make this book tailor-made for a contemporary Pop Culture Vulture like me.
I was expecting all the sharp Stateside wit of your average episode of Fraiser, but perhaps with swearing. Something fun but essentially throwaway. To be honest, I wasn't expecting a hard time.
The first difficulty I blundered across was the relentless voice of the main character, Vernon. This kid's language is hacked into harsh fragments of over-observed teen-speak; sometimes allegorical beyond the years of your average fifteen year old Mall-Rat. This was more like Henry Miller in 'Tropic of Cancer', but with an irksome Texan drawl.
I was then assaulted by the relentless introduction of the characters; a bloated band of widowed Harpies, a slimey selection of authority figures - all with disturbing ulterior motives, vacuous and unlikable fellow teens; all of these freaks were dealt out to me like a bad Poker hand. Oh, and did I mention that all of this was beset by the back-story of a shocking mass murder of sixteen schoolkids?
I wasn't enjoying myself at all. This was hard. This wasn't Homer Simpson saying: D'oh!
I read on, as the awful un-american events unfolded and became seedier and more hopeless. I began to sneer at the bleak nation that was so crudely mapped within the pages. I began to laugh at it.
I suppose that's where I sort of got it - acclimatized if you will. I was no longer on the side of slick, witty america and its throwaway one-liner, sanitized sit-com smugness. I was now snickering and smirking at the ludicrous land that poor Vernon Little was trapped in and was being savagely manipulated by.
I found the whole ghastly media circus, (ringmastered by the cartoonish 'Eulalio Ledesma' character) repulsive and quite hilarious. In the end I was enjoying myself, but I felt like I needed a good shower afterwards.
This is not the america I thought I knew, but I'm certain it's the america that most americans know - or would rather not know.
For that I would urge you to read this book. It's very horrible, it's very vulgar, it's very disturbing, it's very funny.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Warm, Warm Book, 8 Jan 2004
By 
D. C. Njoku (Bracknell, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
After the first 20 pages I've got to admit that I was beginning to lose faith in this book. Sure the language was unusual, but that's been done before and better (if you're adventurous read a book called Sozaboy by Ken Saro-Wiwa) and the story had not yet gripped me. But patience paid off: Vernon God Little blindsided me and without noticing the transition I went from nearly hating the book to loving it.
Do I think it deserved the Booker Prize? Probably not. This book is not a great literary accomplishment (whatever that means), what it is - and what storytelling used to be before it got dirtied by overbearing academic purity - is a great warm yarn that leaves you with a big silly grin on your face. And sometimes that's all we want.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Noose is Tightening, 9 Oct 2003
By 
Eric Anderson (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Hardcover)
Vernon is a typical American teenage boy living in Martirio, Texas. He spends a lot of time fantasizing about the panties of a particular girl. He suffers the abuse of dominant social groups at his high school. He struggles to maintain a sense of normality in his broken home. Only one day his friend Jesus reaches his breaking point and things get out of hand. Suddenly Vernon is caught in a maelstrom of controversy when the nation in its grief points a guilty finger. He must justify his innocence by wading through the media-hype determined to crucify him without the help of his friends and family who are caught up in their own banal problems. Vernon sets out on a surreal escape from America.
Pierre creates a highly original voice in this dark, funny and incredibly clever novel. The structure is somewhere between satire and a dream-like logic where Vernon stumbles upon a number of colorful characters that distract him from his goal. While Vernon himself isn’t especially likeable, his commentary on America with all his clever twists of language is hilarious to read. Vernon and his mother have an uncomfortable but loving relationship. While on death row, Vernon’s mother is more concerned about the delivery of a new almond toned refrigerator. Vernon’s ongoing analysis of the relationship between mother and son is devastating. More than its political commentary, I think this novel makes a powerful statement about familial relations. There has been a lot of attention paid recently to gun control and high school massacres. Pierre manages to make a moving statement about American values using the voice of a decidedly average boy caught in extraordinary circumstances. This isn’t a cynical treatise. For all it’s bitterness, Vernon God Little has a lot of hope.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Life as a game show, 12 Jan 2007
By 
G. L. Haggett "glynlhaggett" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
Parts of this book reveal genuine originality and even the odd spark of genius; other parts, however, show an author a little too much in love with his own self-conscious quirkiness, jemmying in supposedly killer one-liners on every page. The upshot is that the biting satire on the needy, corrupt insincerity of uncaring aspirational middle-class American society is undermined, as too many potentially brilliant strands and ideas fizzle out and remain undeveloped.

All in all, the book descends into an incoherent series of bitty, albeit well-realised, setpieces which does not quite add up to a consolidated whole.

Vernon's world is classically topsy turvy, with those on the outside looking in having the most profound contribution to make. There is a good deal of prescience in the idea of execution as a TV show, complete with 'phone-in votes, as life is devalued and turns into little more than a glorified gameshow. This will ring bells with anyone who saw the footage of the lead up to Saddam Hussein's execution recently.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars the bigger picture, 14 Jun 2005
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
The characters in this book are meant to be unreal, they symbolise the plastic, all consuming parasitic society that is becoming an 'unreal' reality, everyone striving for their own personal gain, hiding behind fear to avoid the stark emptiness that faces them every single day, that they refuse to acknowledge, finding it easier to buy in to this fake, plastic dream then to admit that their own lives lack in every single way. The way that the characters are portrayed as caracatures only serves to highlight this layering, putting layer upon layer over broken dreams and regrets, and the realisation of a common humanity that brings them closer to the protrogenist then they could ever admit. This book for me, highlights the emptiness that pervades everything, that is everywhere all around us. The emptiness and hollowness that I feel in a profound way in this consumer obsessed world. How all our priorities are f**ked as we strive for all the wrong things. Without this understanding I can see why this book provokes so many negative comments, from the likes of Rachel Walker for example who didn't even give the book a chance, but I think this just serves to further, for me at least, the book's success. A great book, like any piece of art should elicit debate and controversy, from those who get it and those that don't. And I think that anyone that has ever felt disassociated or disatisfied with society and what it has to offer will be able to identufy with Vernon Gregory Little and the world of drones that surround him, helpless to control his own fate, a microcosm of the fate of this world.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Goodness triumphant, 10 Dec 2003
By 
R. Simpson (South Kirkby, Yorks, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
From the press coverage at Booker time, this was clearly going to be a novel I would either enjoy enormously or become extremely irritated with. Fortunately it proved to be the former, despite some loss of conviction and narrative energy in the mid-late stages. A rather odd comment on the blurb says that it is 'the only novel quite unlike any other' (so what does Tristram Shandy resemble?), but it is true that it is difficult to categorise: at some stages it even lurches towards the detective story. As a rites of passage story it holds up pretty well, but as a satire on contemporary American society it is hilarious: unfair, perhaps, even obvious, but still hilarious. The most remarkable feature is the essential goodness of the main character: not the likeliest or most fashionable quality for a foul-mouthed, anti-social teenager, especially one on the wrong end of a murder hunt. In my ignorance of the other contestants I can't say whether this is a worthy Booker winner, but, if entertainment is one of the criteria, it was bound to be a contender.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Vernon God Little, 7 Feb 2011
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
The title character is a fifteen-year-old boy who lives in a small town in the U.S. state of Texas. When his friend Jesus Navarro commits suicide after killing sixteen bullying schoolmates, suspicion falls on Vernon, who becomes something of a scapegoat in his small hometown of Martirio. Fearing the death penalty, he goes on the run to Mexico.

This was DCB Pierre's debut novel and he won the Booker prize in 2003 for it. I have absolutely no idea why. There's clear inspiration taken from Catcher in the Rye, but it's like an updated, warped version of it. The author's disgust and revulsion with modern day America is apparent in his vile characters, which are little more than ill-drawn caricatures. His views with regards to modern society have been expressed before and illustrated far better by other writers. It occasionally made me chuckle, there was the odd well observed comment, and it's an interesting premise, but overall I thought it was pretty poor. I think if it had not received such excessive praise and had not won the Booker Prize, I wouldn't be so unimpressed, I was expecting something far more spectacular.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enough to keep you awake., 3 Mar 2009
This review is from: Vernon God Little (Paperback)
Compare and contrast Vernon Little and Holden Caulfield (The Catcher in the Rye), could prove a very interesting essay for all those keen students out there. Never mind that though, let us be honest, how this was short listed for the Booker Prize? God only knows! Despite the unusual writing style, this is just an ordinary novel. One (me in particular here) needed to read several chapters before able to embrace the words and the voice with due credit. It may be difficult for the reader to engage Vernon, without giving time enough. One could quickly and wrongly dismiss this as trashy. The book does improve significantly as you get deeper in, but never makes great heights (or great depths). In part it is much like a teen/road movie as it does not dawdle and just keeps you awake.
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