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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Poignant, perceptive and memorable love story.
Maurice is not among the pioneering works of gay literature in that, though written before World War I, it was only published in 1970, after Forster's death, so it did not carve out a new territory of freedom for gay men. Forster himself said that the book was, by the close of his life, dated. And so it is in that it portrays a society that is long gone. But the emotional...
Published on 11 July 2010 by Steve

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting read
I enjoyed the book and the different levels that it operates on but I think it works best when simply enjoyed for what it is.
Published on 27 Jan. 2013 by Carrie


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3.0 out of 5 stars It's a classic, 15 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Maurice (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
of its vintage
Slow if not plodding story line - the film's screenplay livened up the original
Don't expect much
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The need to love and be loved, 23 Feb. 2000
By A Customer
The story of a young gentleman of the early 20th century England, who has to come to terms with his sexuality in a time where "gay" meant happy, and just that, and one could be sent to prison for such an unspeakable vice as homosexuality. Society has given Maurice a comfortable lifestyle and a place at the top of the rigid British class structure, yet this same society denies him his right to love. Still unaware of his nature, young Maurice is in his first year of University, Clive comes along and awakens deeply buried feelings in him, he finds love, not with a woman but with a gentleman as himself. This hapiness wil not last, and as Clive turns away from him, to live a proper heterosexual life, Maurice has to face loneliness and self denial as he tries to get rid of his homosexual feelings. In midst of all the despair, love comes from where he least expected it. This is without doubt one of the most touching books I have ever read, we feel for Maurice when we read it, we grieve for him and finally rejoice when he finds everlasting love. This book is not about society's prejudice against homosexuality. It is much more about the urge we feel to love and feel loved in a hostile world. I fell in love with Maurice, I fell in love with this book, and you will too.
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A must read, 20 Feb. 2001
Maurice takes a very harsh look at the expectations placed upon a young boy to conform to the idea of patriarchal dominance as he becomes a man. The novel follows Maurices struggle to contain his feeling for other men throughout his time in education and throughout his life. This novel is a critque of society and the pressure it places on people to fit into the expected 'norms'and how it can badly effect peoples lives. This book is a very interesting and easy read and I would reccomend it to people of all ages.
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5.0 out of 5 stars READ ME, 17 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: Maurice (Kindle Edition)
Ahead of his time, beautifully written and well just brilliant!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sensitive portrayal of one man's battle with sexuality, 10 Feb. 2002
By 
L. C. Jones (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Maurice (Hardcover)
Maurice is one of those novels that caused a huge public outcry when it was published but that modern readers will finish wondering what all the fuss could possibly have been about. Maurice is the story of a rather mediocre middle-class man - the book's namesake - and his journey from university student to mature adulthood. Whilst at University he has a very close relationship with another man which borders on the actively homosexual and during this time and throughout the novel, Maurice battles with his 'deviant' sexuality. Whilst his friend ostensibly goes straight and marries (in order to inherit the family fortune and lay claim to the local parliamentary seat), Maurice never really puts the events of his student days behind him. His contact with this friend continues and it is during the periods he spends at his country manor that the majority of the book's action takes place. Eventually Maurice succumbs to his longings and is involved with one of the hired help, Scudder, which brings the issue of class into the picture to jostle alongside sexuality. The novel is a psychological portrait of one man and his struggle to reconcile his true feelings with the prescriptions of society and what it expects of him as a man. It was condemned at the time of publication for being immoral but addressed many issues ignored by Victorian literature and brought them out into the open for the first time. Forster himself was somewhat ostracised as a result but Maurice is a brave and moving attempt to move homosexuality into the public sphere and to make it socially acceptable. Whilst it is not the strongest of texts and can be guilty of stiltedness from time to time, modern authors dealing with issues of sexuality owe much to Forster's early work. Maurice is a sensitive consideration of sexuality versus puritanical societal values and depicts an internal struggle that many still go through in today's 'enlightened society'. Well worth a read.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars perfect illustration of the victorian mentalities.amazing!, 29 April 1999
By A Customer
introducing a young man in struggle with his sexuality in the early 19th century's society,forster throws away each hints of the upper-class's conventions. he satirizes the formality of this social class,its superficiality,its old-dated customs ,its hypocrisis and its incapacity of accepting what is out of its established normality. Maurice,by his sincerity and by his refusal of that conventionnal society(he sees himself as a monster,the same kind of monser as Oscar WILDE who was rejected by the victorian society)shows us there are no normalities neither in any kind of society nor in the whole world. there are no natural attitudes and unnatural ones ,there are only conventions and freedom of being what our mind and heart tell us to be. someone who is said unnatural is not,and he is neither good nor evil,he is just someone who lives in peace with his mind. Forster teaches us again e lesson of freedom,not a freedom from servitude but a freedom of an equal importance:an escape from conventions and tabous that are the sources of hate ,segregation and loneliness.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 10 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Maurice (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
As described
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 11 Nov. 2014
Great book!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Coming out - or staying in?, 22 Jun. 2009
This review is from: Maurice (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
I find 'Maurice' a unique work of Forster's; possibly -
even probably - his best written work and a wonderful
vindication of homosexual love.

Maurice Hall meets Clive Durham at Cambridge and they
have an intensely romantic friendship. (Clive refers to it
as 'platonic'; Maurice wants a more earthy and sexual union
but - at least at the beginning - Clive rejects this.)
Later in the novel Clive decides to abandon Maurice and
he is desolated but, as it turns out, only for the time
being...........

Four stars rather than five? Forster, unluckily, cannot
resist the temptation to write 'purple passages', of which
I quote a few here.

'With eyes that had gone intensely blue, Clive
whispered, 'I love you.'' '

Weren't Clive's eyes 'intensely blue' to start with?

'This set the Doctor (Dr. Barry) off, and he cried,
"How dare you bully your mother, Maurice! You ought
to be horsewhipped. You young puppy! Swaggering about instead
of asking her to forgive you!" '

Is there a smidgeon of unconscious sadism here?

'Life went on as usual - how could Maurice sleep and
rest if he had no friend?'

Definitely one of Forster's sentimental moments.......

However, we come now to that great object of temptation,
Alec's boathouse. Maurice's rough but ardent new friend
is forever asking him to spend the odd night or two of
passion in the boathouse and I have to admit that I got quite
obsessed on first reading the novel with working out how many
times it was mentioned! (In the 1987 film adaptation it looks
more like a Wendy house, but we'll let that pass.)

This was the novel that Forster always wanted to write -
and it shows!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dull, 14 July 2013
By 
Mark B (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Maurice (Kindle Edition)
E.M. Forster is one of my favourite authors, but this is, I'm sorry to say, fairly self-indulgent and joyless.
Yes, it was utterly groundbreaking for its day, but since it wasn't published in its day even its historic value doesn't enhance it.

Dull characters, dull pace, peculiarly dull language, for Forster, just... dull. Its theme has obviously dated and no longer has the least relevance, and its period detail is stilted rather than enlightening.

I suppose I can say I've ticked it off the list, but I wouldn't recommend it.
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Maurice (Penguin Classics)
Maurice (Penguin Classics) by David Leavitt (Paperback - 28 July 2005)
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