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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More original and disturbing than any "Frankenstein" film
In the past I have read several science fiction "classics" such as "War of the worlds", "The Lost World" and several Jules Verne and it is probably been fair to say that these books have been undone by "science fact" with their enduring appeal proabably assisted by Hollywood films or BBC productions. These books have proved to be hugely disappointing and frequently very...
Published on 22 Jan 2011 by Ian Thumwood

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Long Day's Journey Into Horror
If you like horror, you owe it to yourself to read this book from the beginnings of the genre. You will enjoy seeing the themes in Frankenstein repeated in other horror novels that you will read in the future. The book and the movie have essentially nothing in common, so assume that you do not know the story yet if you have only seen the movie.
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Published on 4 Sep 2004 by Donald Mitchell


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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More original and disturbing than any "Frankenstein" film, 22 Jan 2011
By 
Ian Thumwood "ian17577" (Winchester) - See all my reviews
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In the past I have read several science fiction "classics" such as "War of the worlds", "The Lost World" and several Jules Verne and it is probably been fair to say that these books have been undone by "science fact" with their enduring appeal proabably assisted by Hollywood films or BBC productions. These books have proved to be hugely disappointing and frequently very poorly written. Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is saturated in the melodrama of her age but the quality of the writing and the true horror in many instances genuinely mark this book up as a classsic.

The most striking thing is just how different this book is from your perception. I was surprised just how little I actually knew of the story as it bears no resemblance to any film about "Frankenstein" I have seen. In fact, Shelley offers very little physical description of her "daemon" and the horror of the narrative stems from the fact that the monster has almost super-human powers with which to torment his creator Victor Frankenstein. I was fascinated by the first third of the book and by the time I had read with disbelief that the story could take such a turn concerning the machinations that brought about the fate of the character Justine, I was totally hooked. Oddly for a book of the early 19th Century, the story does not conclude with a totally satisfactory ending and the monster's intended fate would definately have shocked the audience of the time. Part of the book's success stems from the fact that the monster is extremely intelligent and has a strong conscience yet remains hell bent on bringing about the most terrible destruction of the things his creator holds dear.

Ultimately, my impression was why had film directors in the past taken so many liberties with the original story when this would so obviously make a powerful film with some wonderful locations and plenty of menace to produce a piece of cinema that would have such memorable scenes as to be compelling. Definately worth checking out.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dreadfully good..., 7 Sep 2010
I was probably blessed in that, before I read this hands-down classic, I hadn't seen any film adaptations of it, not even the famous 1931 version that created the iconic Halloween costume. I had a faint inkling of the story but not much else and I'm more than glad that I began reading with little of these preconceptions, and thus finishing it made it all the more worthwhile. This is one of those books that leaves you with the "I've just read a classic" feeling.

Using the letters of Walton, captain of an Arctic vessel, as a the framing device, Shelley is able to launch the reader into her dark world of galvanism and horror that truly pigeonhole this novel into the Gothic genre. The brutality of the things inflicted upon the poor Victor Frankenstein by his creation are told with a gripping and intense voice, one that speaks often about his traumatised mind - it is for this reason that I have dropped one star from five, as at a few points in the novel I felt that these passages were a little too excessive and rambling, but it is this psychological depth that gives the book its impact. It's rare that I feel genuinely sorry for a character, but Victor Frankenstein is now an exception due to the sheer number of tragedies that befall him.

Similar to other novels of the genre such as The Monk, several of the chapters are taken up by an account given by the Monster himself, something which I never expected - I was under the impression due to Hollywood cliches that the creature couldn't talk! This narrative is in itself heartbreaking, due to the Monster's lack of human contact, his slow shunning of society and his descent into bitter twistedness that forces him to commit all manner of terrifying deeds.

The book's main argument - the consequences of playing God - does indeed seem increasingly relevant, what with the growing power of science and its need to understand everything. Perhaps Shelley considered her novel a warning, foretelling what might happen if scientists went a step too far? Perhaps the creation of robots that look and act scarily human is on a par with Frankenstein's cadaverous monster? Whole essays could be written on the subject! Lord only knows what impact this book made at the time, dealing with issues that were so ahead of its time!

So on the whole a good strong classic that is essential reading for all. And just why is it considered such a masterwork? Because it's so darn good! A little bit superfluous in places, but nonetheless a gripping, gloomy and Gothic classic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Frankenstein - A Review by Barry Van-Asten, 12 Feb 2012
By 
Mr. B. P. Van-asten (London, England.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Frankenstein (Paperback)
Frankenstein, or the modern Prometheus, bublished in 1818 by Mary Shelley (1797-1851), is told through the letters of an English explorer in the Arctic, named Walton. It relates the exploits of Victor Frankenstein, a Genevan student of philosophy at the University of Ingolstadt. He discovers the secret of giving life to inanimate matter and assembles a terrifying human figure from fresh cadavers and gives it life! The creature has the supernatural strength of a super being and because of his differences and mistreatment he becomes a lonely and miserable 'monster', who turns on frankenstein, after failing to convince his creator that he needs a female companion. He murders Victor's brother and his friend Clerval and also his bride Elizabeth. Frankenstein pursues the creature to the Arctic and attempts to destroy it, but dies after telling his tale to Walton. The monster declared that his creator would be his last victim and disappears into the snowy waste.
The story is beautifully written and this 'blue-print' for all monster creations is also a cautionary tale on how nature, which is essentially good, can be corrupted by ill treatment. Those familiar with the many film versions will be surprised with the original tale and how it differs in interpretation from current perceptions of the creature. fantastic!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A dark classic, 5 Sep 2010
This review is from: Frankenstein (Kindle Edition)
Having seen many film versions, I wanted to return to the source material to make my own comparisons. Whilst the language has obviously dated a little, the story of a man reaching for the sun and burning his hand is a timeless one. The pace of the story is slower than I expected and much of the description focuses on the lead character's inner conflicts rather than their actions. A brooding, gothic tale and essential reading for any student of the genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb!, 6 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Frankenstein (Kindle Edition)
Excellent service and product. As expected! Highly recommended and would purchase again from this seller. Delivery was quick and goods arrived undamaged.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Frankenstein, 21 April 2013
By 
S Riaz "S Riaz" (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
Having read a few books about Mary Shelley, including the highly recommended Shelley and the Maiden: The Death of Fanny Wollstonecraft and Young Romantics: The Shelleys, Byron and Other Tangled Lives, I was keen to read the novel which came about through a competition as to who could write the best horror story between Mary, Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and John Polidori. It was 1816, the year without a summer, caused by the volcanic eruption of Mount Tambora the previous year. On a rainy evening by Lake Geneva, the competition resulted in a book which has created literally hundreds of Hollywood movies. Yet, not one comes close to capturing the real sense of this tragic tale. So, forget green men with bolted necks and read the original.

The story begins with letters to his sister from Robert Walton, a failed poet, who has set out to explore the North Pole. On his travels he sights a sledge carrying an immense figure and, later, pulls aboard a starving and emaciated man who turns out to be scientist Victor Frankenstein. As Frankenstein tells his tale, we learn how his obsession with succeeding in his scientific endeavours leads to his creating a 'creature' a 'daemon' which, as soon as he has managed to bring it to life he flees from in horror at what he has done. However, life is never that simple and Frankenstein soon finds that the creature he has unleashed on the world will have terrible repercussions on his life and that of his family. It is also the story of the creature himself, who suffers misery, depression and isolation. Both feel reproach for their actions and yet are unable to overcome their horror of themselves and what both have done. If you know something of Mary Shelley's life, it will certainly help you view this story in a different light but, whether you do delve deeper or not, you will almost certainly find this book is not what you expected.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich and complex tale, 6 April 2013
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
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Put all thoughts of Hammer Horror to one side as Mary Shelley's intriguing and provocative tale is nothing like the rather bad films and adaptations it has spawned. Structured as an embedded series of narratives told by Robert Walton, an explorer; Victor Frankenstein, a scientist who plays god; and the significantly unnamed `creature', this tale engages with conceptions of what it means to be human in the early part of the nineteenth century.

That Mary Shelley was herself pregnant at the time she wrote this adds another layer to this rich story of creator/progeny where the `father' is horrified by the `child' he has created. But this is also a book which engages with questions about innate `human' nature vs. nurture, and the extent to which we are created by our social and cultural environments.

That the `creature' itself is well-read and comes to understand its own creation, existence and desires through Milton's Paradise Lost is only one of the complexities of this book; and the increasing mutual identification between Frankenstein and his creation turns the expected hierarchy of man and monster on its head.

So it's certainly possible to simply read this as a chilling tale of gothic horror - but an interesting number of themes put to work here foreshadow Shriver's We Need To Talk About Kevin, and Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Frankenstein Mary Shelley, 1818, 6 Nov 2012
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Frankenstein
Mary Shelley, 1818

Here's another classic story I'm reading for the first time! Frankenstein the novel, as I suspected, is almost nothing like the various incarnations of Frankenstein I've run across over the years. I've seen so many versions of the monster in childrens' shows, comedy specials, skits, and other forms of media, but none of the pop-culture depictions of the monster seem to accurately represent the sadness and abundant emotion of the book.

I shouldn't be surprised at it anymore, but it seems like all British or American literature from the 19th century has to be set inside a frame story--the narrative has to be told to somebody who told somebody who is telling the reading audience about it, or something equally layered. Frankenstein is actually not told by Victor Frankenstein or by his created monster, but by a third party whose main purpose seems to be praising Victor Frankenstein's character to the high heavens.

The story starts out with some guy, Captain Robert Walton, writing to his sister about the weather in St. Petersburg. He's a sea captain and he is preparing for a big voyage to the Arctic, where he hopes something amazing and purposeful awaits him. As his letters continue, it becomes clear that Walton is seriously poetic and he really wants a like-minded best friend because pouring out his heart in well-composed letters to his sister is just not doing justice to the depth of his feelings. But Walton's loneliness doesn't last for too long because his crew soon discovers a dying man floating on a big piece of ice. As the man, Victor, is nursed back to health, he admits to Walton that he has been in the Arctic chasing another person, or rather a "demon" as he calls him. Then Victor begins to share his long, tragic story with the captain.

Victor's thirst for knowledge led him to serious questions about the nature of life and souls. He was a brainiac who devoted himself to the intense study of various educational disciplines, including a few areas of spiritualism and quackery. Time passed and Victor learned how to give life to inanimate biological objects. He cobbled together an eight-fool-tall body, ran an electric current and some other stuff through it, and brought the ugly creature to liiiiiife. But no sooner does his pet project come to life, than Victor runs away from it in disgust. Strangely, it's at this point that I, as a reader, go from feeling a certain fondness for Victor and his obsessive studying to feeling outright revulsion for him because he refuses to take responsibility for something he made.

And I do feel very sorry for the monster, which I did not expect to happen. The monster does some cruel, vile things, but he had no real guidance. He didn't ask to be created and abandoned, and it isn't his fault that his own creator views him with absolute horror. Victor created a life that could have had some value if he had chosen to assign said value to it, but instead he leaves the creature alone in hopes that it will run away and just not be his problem anymore! But it becomes his problem once again when the creature kills his younger brother and frames a servant for the crime.

At one of the climaxes of the story, the creature confronts Victor and talks to him for the first time. The creature has been through a lot of painful encounters with human beings, most of which began with him trying to do something kind and ended with him doing something destructive. He wants Victor to make him a companion so he can live happily ever after with her in the wilderness, but his plans for a monster wedding don't ever come to fruition because Victor sabotages the effort. Victor and his monster proceed in a gruesome game of one-upsmanship where each tries to hurt the other horribly, and they both succeed. When this very short book is over, the body-count is about as high as your typical Shakespearean tragedy: everyone we care about (and some people we don't) has died.

What's the moral of the story, then, if you're looking for one? Perhaps that seeking after too much knowledge or pursuing science for science's sake is a bad idea. Jurassic Park has also taught us that. Another moral or lesson I see in Frankenstein is the importance of compassion and empathy--if Victor had cared for his creation as he ought to, the many, many deaths could have been averted. That's why the story is tragic; a little less obsession and selfishness from our protagonist would have changed everything. Grade: B

Favorite quotes:

-"Thus strangely are our souls constructed, and by such slight ligaments are we bound to prosperity or ruin." (pg 16)

Victor-"But now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. " (pg 26)

Monster-"I will revenge my injuries; if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear, and chiefly towards you my arch-enemy" (pg 80)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not What You Expect, 23 Nov 2010
A great idea - how would God respond to his own creation - is fitted into a suitably melodramatic plot. No wonder it gripped the Victorian imagination.

Everyone knows Frankenstein - the movies, cartoons, take offs, stage plays and nightmares but many fewer have read the book and to do so is to be enlightened as to what the fuss is all about. Because this is a book that has a real horror at its heart, not though individual squeamish scenes - although there are several of those but by asking the very profound question of how a God should react to his own creation.

In this story Frankenstein (who is the creator not the monster) forms a man out of body parts and is so revolted by his creature that he immediately abandons it and in so doing opens the possibility of it doing either good or evil from its own free will. The genius of the novel is that it is never really clear whether the monster is essentially good or entirely evil but with incredible guile so as to appear susceptible to good, or just confused - like the rest of us. This confusion is the true horror of the book and the murders and terror that the monster enacts are simply melodrama to the reflection of our own souls.

It's not brilliant writing, but bowls along well enough, and the plot gets apace in a Victorian way. There is nothing about this book save its conceit that makes it exceptional - but that conceit is powerful and marvelous. For this theme of what it must be to create life, the responsibilities of the creator and the created, how the created understands itself and its desires and what its creator thinks of his being is marvelous stuff, that I have not come across in any other literature.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Overall, worth reading, 7 May 2009
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Ever since Mary Shelley had the nightmare that gave birth to the idea of Frankenstein, it has become a very well known, and popular horror story, through film and book. As the original thoughts were preserved in the book, I gave it a read, and was not disappointed.

Thematically, the book is enjoyable and a must-read for its originality, Shelley examining the themes of life and death, curse, ambition and revenge. If you can put it into its 19th century context, the idea of creating a life out of death would be regarded as irreverent and horrific, and at the time would have been a true horror story, maybe more appreciated than it is now. It is a story using an epistolary technique that takes you through the rise and fall of Victor Frankenstein (NOT the monster!), whose creation has caved in on himself. Mary Shelley fills the main plot with many intricacies, and slight surprises, which adds to the excitement of the story.

Shelley writes in a very eloquent style that represents more the feelings of Frankenstein than external descriptions, the descriptions are normally perceived through his own eyes. The character of Frankenstein is thereby greatly explored, in an interesting way.

The reason why I have this book 4 stars is because Shelley's writing can be rather verbose at times, which at times can make small parts of the book unnecessarily described and on the edge of being tedious.

Notwithstanding this relatively minor problem, the book is a classic, and for the good reasons above for reading it, it remains a book that you should read.
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Frankenstein (Clothbound Classics)
Frankenstein (Clothbound Classics) by Mary Shelley (Hardcover - 3 Oct 2013)
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