Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back in the night
I first read this spy novel in 1993 shortly after its publication, and have re-read it many times since then - most recently last week. It's probably my favourite le Carré book (and I've read all of them), blending a gripping, original plot with deftly-drawn characters and dialogue which resonates in the mind so precisely you can practically hear the voices in...
Published 9 months ago by Jeremy Walton

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I’m pretty much on the left myself and pretty much espouse ...
Never would have thought that I would give a LeCarre novel two measly stars but that is the case with this, and I speak as someone who would always put his Tinker, Tailor near the top of any top-ten list of books. I threw in the towel around page 250 . . . just couldn’t read another racist, misogynistic, preachy word. And God is it preachy; I’m pretty much on...
Published 4 months ago by KIKAREN


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back in the night, 9 Sept. 2014
By 
Jeremy Walton (Sidmouth, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Night Manager (Paperback)
I first read this spy novel in 1993 shortly after its publication, and have re-read it many times since then - most recently last week. It's probably my favourite le Carré book (and I've read all of them), blending a gripping, original plot with deftly-drawn characters and dialogue which resonates in the mind so precisely you can practically hear the voices in your head. Take, for example, this initial exchange [p24] between the two protagonists, which quickly tells you a great deal about who they are, and the differences between them:

"I'm Dicky Roper," a lazy voice announced as the hand closed round Jonathan's, and briefly owned it. "My chaps booked some rooms here. Rather a lot of 'em. How d'you do?" Belgravia slur, the proletarian accent of the vastly rich. They had entered each other's private space.

"How very good to see you, Mr Roper," Jonathan murmured, English voice to English voice. "Welcome back, sir, and poor you, what a perfectly ghastly journey you must have had. Wasn't it rather heroic to venture aloft at all? No one else has, I can tell you. My name's Pine, I'm the night manager."

The story is about Pine's penetration of Roper's luxurious, nefarious world as the latter engineers an enormous deal involving drugs, arms, investment bankers and corrupt UK and US officials. Themes that run through the story include sacrifice, honour, courage, love and (as is de rigeur with this author) betrayal. But the delight for the reader (especially the re-reader) comes in picking out eye-catching examples of the writing: a landscape is "dour and blowy like Scotland with the lights on", "shoeless" pelicans sit "like feathery old bombing planes that might never bomb again", the noise made by a well-fed government minister is "a kind of slurrying grunt", and Pine's spymaster describes himself as "the other kind of Yorkshireman". Just perfect.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pine's quest, 10 July 2007
By 
Stephen A. Haines (Ottawa, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Night Manager (Paperback)
Jonathan Pine, sometime hotelier, soldier, killer, lover and agent, is swept up in a complex international intrigue. Weapons for sale is the pivot around which money, power and even romance impinge on Jonathan's life. The many roles, varied and useful as they are, leave him with no particular purpose in life. Until he encounters "the worst man in the world". The prompt is Sophie, who might have been a lover, but who belongs to Freddie Hamid. Freddie is aligned with Richard Onslow Roper, of Nassau, the Bahamas. The name and location are almost a slap in the face, since the Caribbean island-nations are host to shady firms. Little or no taxes and even less government supervision make it possible for the unscrupulous to engage in many forms of chicanery. Drugs and weapons loom large in that realm.

Left at loose ends by the fall of the Soviet Union, British Intelligence services need a fresh cause. If nothing else, all those bureaucratic structures and their personnel need to turn their expertise to new tasks. The problem is that the Cold War enabled influential people to develop links through the various spy networks. How many wealthy aristocrats are now involved in picking up the pieces to further enrich themselves? And which ones are doing so? Pine, picked up by one of the new spin-off intelligence organisations is set to learn answers to these questions. A faked murder sends him to unreachable places with a new identity. It puts him in a position to penetrate the Roper organisation. Throughout this tale, Pine is driven by the ghost of Sophie, who was found beaten to death in Egypt. Even in the backwoods of Quebec, hiding from authorities and maneuvering to complete his mission, he is beset by the image of her in his mind.

LeCarre's style is well applied in this tale of international wheeling and dealing. He exhibits a well-versed familiarity with the places described. It's his characters, however, that give this story its richness. From the intelligence bureaucrats through the "heavies" Roper employs as his protectors and fronts, to Pine and the women his life touches, there are no false images conveyed. The author portrays them effectively and consistently with no distracting or invalid diversions. Which is not to imply any of them are shallow or above credibility. Although the conclusion is unexpected, especially given the circumstances, the "spy novel" author has brought a new facet to intelligence writing. It's a captivating book and well worth either the established LeCarre fan or someone taking him up for the first time to have in their collection. [stephen a. haines - Ottawa, Canada]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fall From Grace, 19 May 2014
By 
M. Dowden (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Night Manager (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
First published in 1993 this novel actually starts in 1991 just after the Gulf War has started. Jonathan Pine is the night manager of the title in a Swiss hotel, and we can see that he is waiting for an important guest to arrive, one that he hates. We then learn of Pine’s past, and why he hates this man, Mr Roper. The year previous due to a woman Pine handed over certain documents to the British Embassy in Cairo, with fatal consequences.

Pine wants his revenge on Roper, but it will take the intervention of a British intelligence agency to help him. This isn’t James Bond; this is much slower paced and more thoughtful. Roper is an illegal arms dealer and some want him brought down, made an example of, and a warning to others who also carry out the same business, but as you read along here, you see how the real world works. Selling arms illegally is a crime, but it does help to bolster investments, with some institutions not too worried where their money comes from, as long as they see a good return. Roper needs some serious finance to pull off a greatly profitable sale and so he needs backers, and thus starts touting for investors. At the same time an operation to get Pine in with Roper is put under way. But what will the outcome be?

With intelligence agencies in-fighting to have the greatest authority and sway, it looks like the whole operation to bring Roper down could be in jeopardy, and how high does this go? There is a lot of money needed for Roper to do his business, and there are some major financiers involved. Who can trust who, when a single sentence could put someone onto the plan, and a lot of powerful people in the line for prosecution? Pine is on the front line doing his job, but what will his masters do back in London?

With a two edged tale, and some romance thrown in Carre makes you wonder about certain things that go on in the world, and why these carry on, in a story that is just as much about politics as it is about spying. In all this is a great read, which I’m sure many will want to read time and again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I’m pretty much on the left myself and pretty much espouse ..., 28 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Night Manager (Paperback)
Never would have thought that I would give a LeCarre novel two measly stars but that is the case with this, and I speak as someone who would always put his Tinker, Tailor near the top of any top-ten list of books. I threw in the towel around page 250 . . . just couldn’t read another racist, misogynistic, preachy word. And God is it preachy; I’m pretty much on the left myself and pretty much espouse the same causes that LeCarre registers here but you know, show not tell, John.
Maybe it is dated and perhaps if I had read it at the time which I think is around 1993 I would have been more drawn to it. Having said which, I recently [couple of years ago] re-read Smileys People and found it every bit as vital and relevant as when it was originally published.
Two-hundred-and-fifty pages is a lot, normally I would know by page 50 if something was worth my time but there is a review on here by someone who says it is his best novel ever and since looking at the ratings and the quality of the other books he is reviewing, I trusted his judgement. Which is why I went way beyond my fifty-page cut-off point.
So, massive disappointment.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fine book,compulsive reading., 25 April 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Night Manager (Paperback)
From the moment you pick it up,it smacks of a good novel.The hero Jonathon is a multilayered,Upright Englishman who takes on the most daring mission of infiltrating Dicky ropers complex network of associates(not to mention his georgeous woman Jed).Only fault is that it never really explains too well the reason he takes on this kamikaze mission(some story about a girl from his past in Cairo who`s murder was linked to Roper).All and all,it is a very enjoyable read from one of the finest writers of thrillers around.
Noel from dublin,Ireland.
glocks28@hotmail.com
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomenal, 25 Feb. 2008
By 
Alex (London, UK) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Night Manager (Paperback)
Having read a large chunk of le Carre's work I was blown away by this fantastic book. Dicky Roper is in living memory the best drawn baddie I've come across - several months after reading the book I can still picture him perfectly. For such a long book it is excellently timed - there are very few slow parts, and whilst the main story is set against a backdrop in internecine struggle within various intelligence agencies, is is still clear and very readable.

I don't expect ever to see it but a prequel setting out how Roper got going would be a joy...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars the masters touch, 16 May 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Night Manager (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
Critics on here have said this book is slow; well so it is. That very slowness is where Le Carré shows his class. The descriptions of places, people and situations are used like Turner's brush. It is not the slowness which creates boredom, but the slowness of tension building like a can filling a drop at a time. Our hero is drawn slowly but surely into a spiders web and you know where he is going, you want to warn him; but he knows and still goes on. Like a tourniquet being slowly tightened, all the exits and turning points are passed. The only criticism that is valid is a credibility gap in the denouement which is a bit more Ian Fleming than John Le Carré, but after all it is a novel!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The Night Manager, 2 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Night Manager (Kindle Edition)
This book starts well, then goes into a build-up phase which in my view is much too long, to the extent that I almost gave up on the thing. The characters and the situation seemed contrived; or perhaps it was that the process of contriving them was too obvious, as if Le Carre had been making it all up as he went along, and hadn't bothered to go back and edit it down. But then, roughly half-way through the book, the story seemed to come to life, and to become compelling. So the message is: stick with it, it's well worth it in the end.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars clever, 5 Oct. 2013
By 
Paul Morris "Unclemo" (Ventnor ,England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Night Manager (Paperback)
Liked this a lot - the author certainly has the touch and obviously has a background in espionage.
Le Carre just seems to know his protagonist(s) so well and his style of writing is good.
I just wish he wouldn't think it necessary to spend wasted time on romance stuff - a waste of time in my opinion and he never gets it right somehow.He should leave the slushy stuff to the chiclit brigade.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars I like le Carré's Smiley novels, 1 May 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Night Manager (Kindle Edition)
Dated novel. I like le Carré's Smiley novels, but by the time he wrote this he was past his prime. James Bond type hero, a babe magnet who can get hit over the head umpteen times without suffering more than a headache or spoiling his good looks. Barbi doll female characters. The BBC is making a tv dramatisation which 'updates' the plot, and the sexual politics hopefully.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Night Manager (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Night Manager (Penguin Modern Classics) by John le Carré (Paperback - 7 Nov. 2013)
£7.19
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews