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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Day by day account of the events leading to the Civil War
This is the first of 3 books by C.V. Wedgewood dealing with the Civil War (the others are The King's War, and The Trial of James I). This book starts with a 150 page overview of the social, political, economic and religious state of Britain in 1637. This shows up the strengths and weaknesses of the book. The author obviously knows the period very well and has a great...
Published on 30 Oct. 2001

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1.0 out of 5 stars Like reading the phone book
I did not enjoy this book and was glad when I had finished it. I learnt a certain amount but should have learnt far more but was prevented from doing so owing to the author's dull, laborious way of writing. Miss Wedgwood had no talent for bringing her subject to life. A great blanket of turgid prose suffocates the dramatic events she describes. For reasons hard to...
Published 26 days ago by Bookworm


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Day by day account of the events leading to the Civil War, 30 Oct. 2001
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This review is from: The King's Peace, 1637-41 (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
This is the first of 3 books by C.V. Wedgewood dealing with the Civil War (the others are The King's War, and The Trial of James I). This book starts with a 150 page overview of the social, political, economic and religious state of Britain in 1637. This shows up the strengths and weaknesses of the book. The author obviously knows the period very well and has a great depth of knowledge about the period, but tends to include too much.
Throughout the book there is a little too much detail so that at times the broad implications of individual events are buried in their immediate and specific effects. For example, I do not exactly understand why the King so abjectly surrenders to the will of the Long Parliament. Although the book provides a detailed list of all the Bills that Charles I concedes to Parliament, and explains why they are so important, it does not satisfactorily explain why he does not put up more of a fight. On the other hand all the events are fully described, and the motives behind each players actions are explained. This provides for a satisfying read.
As events begin to spiral out of the King's control, the book becomes compelling reading. I am looking forward to starting the next book in the series.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Like reading the phone book, 2 Mar. 2015
This review is from: The King's Peace, 1637-41 (Penguin Classics) (Paperback)
I did not enjoy this book and was glad when I had finished it. I learnt a certain amount but should have learnt far more but was prevented from doing so owing to the author's dull, laborious way of writing. Miss Wedgwood had no talent for bringing her subject to life. A great blanket of turgid prose suffocates the dramatic events she describes. For reasons hard to understand the literary establishment embraced her and showered her with disproportionate praise and recognition. To that extent she is like that other literary Dame of the British Empire,Hilary Mantel.
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The King's Peace, 1637-41 (Penguin Classics)
The King's Peace, 1637-41 (Penguin Classics) by C. V. Wedgwood (Paperback - 26 July 2001)
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