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81 of 84 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fault in Our Stars
Let me start out by saying that this book ripped my heart from my chest, crumpled it and then proceeded to throw it on the ground and trample on it in the most beautiful way imaginable.
I was slightly hesitant going into this book as I don't read many contemporary novels, and it was so hyped up by both friends and reviews I've read/seen about it that I was sure I was...
Published 10 months ago by Alexandra

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74 of 85 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings
Hazel was diagnosed with metastatic thyroid cancer at the age of thirteen. Three years later the disease is being kept at bay indefinitely thanks to an experimental new drug. Her days are spent carting her oxygen tank between college, home, and Cancer Kid Support Group. Her treatment regime means that she has little time for friends her own age, and besides, now that...
Published 22 months ago by Marie


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81 of 84 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fault in Our Stars, 5 Jan 2014
This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
Let me start out by saying that this book ripped my heart from my chest, crumpled it and then proceeded to throw it on the ground and trample on it in the most beautiful way imaginable.
I was slightly hesitant going into this book as I don't read many contemporary novels, and it was so hyped up by both friends and reviews I've read/seen about it that I was sure I was in for some major disappointment.
I couldn't have been more wrong. John Green's writing is something I rarely find, the kind where I never stumble over a word in mid-sentence because it flows so perfectly. The story itself was just phenomenal. I fell in love with the characters, I laughed at the dark humor, I cried continuously for a good five or six chapters and no word of a lie I have never cried at a book before (I tend to have somewhat of an ice heart).
Please, please do not be put off by the hype this book has received, it truly is warranted, and even if, like me, you don't tend to read much contemporary give it a go. This is one of those books that I feel pretty much most people could find enjoyment in. I already have a list of friends and family members that I will be loaning this book to because in my humble opinion everyone needs to experience the flawlessness that is The Fault in Our Stars.
A.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A POIGNANT LOVE STORY, 26 Oct 2014
This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
A copy of ‘The Fault in our Stars’ by John Green was given to me to read by my fourteen year old granddaughter who had seen the film, read the book and was truly captivated. She is not an avid reader and I am grateful to the author for producing a novel that captured her attention and I hope this will be the start of a long ‘love affair’ with the written word.

‘The Fault in Our Stars’ had been on my reading list for some time. Initially recommended by Richard & Judy Book Club and was the ‘Spring 2013 Book Club Winner.’

It has been almost thirty years since I spent Friday evenings with my two daughters watching ‘weepy videos’ whilst eating crisps and ice cream. I must admit since then I steer clear of them, finding them too slushy, sentimental and predictable.

Predominately a Young Adult writer, John Green has written a story that deftly crosses all generations.
I was initially hesitant about reading this book having recently failed to complete a novel about teenagers, believing that at sixty two, I was ‘over the hill’ to appreciate a story involving young girls with a youthful outlook and mannerisms.
How wrong I was!!! ‘A Fault in Our Stars’ quickly became compulsive reading.

Hazel Grace has terminal cancer. When her mother insists she needs to ‘get out of the house and mix with people’ Hazel attends a Cancer Kid Support Group. There she meets Augustus Waters and they fall in love.

Theirs is a poignant love story, it is sad and may make you cry at times however it must be said that it is also touching, funny, uplifting, life affirming and will make you question your own beliefs regarding terminal illness and death, loss and grief.

Although you virtually know the end from the start – this is not a depressing story.
It is about terminal illness and its’ affects on the victims and those closest to them.
‘A Fault in Our Stars’ is a well written, quick, easy read, packed with dark humour.

This is a story suitable for all ages, even if you are ‘not into’ weepy tales, this will surely touch your heart.

Sometimes one needs to read outside their favoured genre/comfort zone to enable a truly unique experience.

On exploring the reviews there appears to be a relatively large amount of young adults who loved this book and anything that encourages young people to embrace the ‘written word’ has a ‘thumbs up’ from me.
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427 of 460 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Put aside any resistance, this is worth reading, 26 May 2012
By 
Julia Flyte - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
I have to admit, even though I'd heard this book was really good, the thought of a young adult novel about teenagers with cancer didn't hugely appeal to me. My initial reactions were also somewhat less than stellar - everyone talks in a razor-sharp, ultra witty way that feels straight out of an Aaron Sorkin or Diablo Cody movie and not even remotely how any 16 or 17 year old I know speaks. I feared that it was going to be all style without substance, bouncing along until a requisite tearjearking conclusion.

I was wrong.

This is a book peopled with a group of characters that you really care about. At its core are the star-crossed lovers, Hazel (with terminal cancer) and Augustus (a cancer survivor). They meet at a cancer support group and become close, despite Hazel's desire to avoid becoming a "grenade" in anybody's life - by which she means someone who will unwittingly cause significant hurt through their passing. They are fantastically loveable characters, who flit between deep conversations about the meaning of life and finding refuge in video games and reality TV shows. I loved them both. Still do.

But the book is more than that. It's about coming to terms with the fact that your life will almost certainly never rise above insignificance - yes, you will matter to your family and friends, hey maybe even write a few reviews that people like on Amazon, but ultimately you probably won't make any life changing impact on the world. It's about the way we shrink from people with terminal disease only to laud them when they pass. It's about the impact that terminal diseases have on the families of those left behind. It's about teenagers growing up and learning to take responsibility for their own lives, defining themselves by who they are not what disease they may have.

I don't know if there's anything life changing here, but it's definitely a moving, entertaining and thought provoking book. Pretty hard combination to pull off. Kudos to John Green.
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54 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heartbreaking, 2 Feb 2014
This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
This is the third John Green novel I’ve read, and it’s definitely my favourite. As a character, Hazel captivated me from the start. She’s been terminally ill for several years, so her attitude towards life is intriguing, insightful and believable. Augustus didn’t resonate with me quite so much. He’s a little less believable – perhaps a bit overly extrovert. Nevertheless, I still understood why Hazel was so drawn to him.

The Fault in Our Stars is a quick read; I finished it within a day or two. That’s thanks to its addictive storyline and John Green’s smooth writing style that lets you forget the words and see the world beyond them instead. The direction of storyline isn’t as straight forward as I thought it would be when I first began reading, and I loved that about it. I did figure it out quite early on, but it didn’t matter.

Strangely, considering how much of an emotional wreck I can be, I didn’t actually cry while reading The Fault in Our Stars, which is a bit disappointing. I felt utterly sad, of course, but the lack of real tears tells me that my connection with the characters and their lives was not quite strong enough. I would have liked to have been pulled just a little further into the story, and I think that it was my faltering belief in Augustus that stopped me. I would have benefitted from a better understanding of Augustus, I think, but I just couldn’t quite get to grips with his personality.

That said, I’d recommend The Fault in Our Stars to everyone. It reminds you how precious life is, and how lucky we are to be healthy. It reminds you to take every opportunity you get, and I love that about it. I’m sure The Fault in Our Stars will stay with me for a long time, and I’d be tempted to revisit it again in the future if I feel like I’m forgetting.
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74 of 85 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings, 15 Jan 2013
By 
Marie (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
Hazel was diagnosed with metastatic thyroid cancer at the age of thirteen. Three years later the disease is being kept at bay indefinitely thanks to an experimental new drug. Her days are spent carting her oxygen tank between college, home, and Cancer Kid Support Group. Her treatment regime means that she has little time for friends her own age, and besides, now that she's a Cancer Kid most of them don't know how to behave around her anyway. So she is intrigued to say the least when an attractive and witty young man named Augustus Waters turns up unexpectedly at support group one week.

The predominant niggle that stopped me from really losing myself in this book is that Hazel and Gus just don't come across as realistic teenagers at all. They both have this incredibly verbose, Dawson's Creek-esque way of speaking that is laden with cheesy metaphors. The whole thing is narrated by Hazel, and the insight that that gives into her thought processes and inner dialogue makes her just about relatable, but Augustus feels like he's reading from a script the whole time. I had this sense that for every frank exchange of emotions between them, they had spent five minutes flipping through a thesaurus beforehand. I found this really annoying to the point that it prevented me from becoming emotionally invested with either of the characters.

What it does really well is illustrates how immensely trying it must be to be a sick teenager, be it with cancer or any chronic disease. I believe John Green drew on his experiences of working as a chaplain at a childrens' hospital to write the novel, and he has certainly made plenty of astute and unsentimental observations about the realities of living with illness. At just the age when you should be finding your independence and forging a groove for yourself in the world, you are forced to rely more heavily on the adults around you than ever. A 16-year-old in the UK is legally allowed to get married or join the army but when it comes to making decisions about their own healthcare the law is complex. They can give consent to medical care but if they want to refuse a particular treatment their wishes can be overridden by their parents or doctors. It's no wonder that Hazel talks about herself and her fellow Cancer Kids as feeling experimented on. And she's got the extra burden of guilt of knowing that her parents have to forgo treats and holidays because of the costs of her medication and care.

The tragic relationship between Hazel and Augustus is what this book is all about - there's a slightly strange side-story about taking a trip to Amsterdam to meet Hazel's favourite author, but other than that there is not much plot to speak of. It's for that reason that I think so much of a reader's enjoyment of this novel will depend on their own personal world view and experiences of cancer, illness, and losing loved ones. The subject matter is so emotive that it's bound to provoke an almost visceral response that runs much deeper than any assessment of the words on the page. It wasn't for me, but you can't argue with the widespread acclaim it has received that shows it has tugged on the heart-strings of many.
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200 of 232 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As Emotionally Devastating As It Is Exquisitely Written, 12 Jan 2012
This is John Green at his best and oh is that good. The characters are beautifully drawn and heartbreakingly realistic, Hazel Lancaster doesn't represent anything and her suffering and that of her peers isn't meant to make any kind of point. It's just what it is, suffering. Equally so Hazel is simply Hazel, a girl who watches really trashy TV and loves long novels and poetry.

In being just an ordinary teenage girl she really fancies a boy and here is where we come across Augustus Waters, the boy who clenches death itself between his teeth just to prove it doesn't own him.

Through these two characters we are shown every agonizing moment of living with cancer and the fight not only to carry on living but to stop it from consuming your mind and your personality. The book seems to pose the question, if your entire personality has become nothing but the need to fight and survive cancer and there is no longer room for joy or even love, then in what way is that living?.

A large part of this struggle takes place within family circles, the parallel desperation and monotony of having a child with cancer is skilfully and subtly made evident by Green.

Ultimately Green strives to portray his characters not as those fighting cancer are often shown, forced into playing the role of brave and wise soldiers stoically enduring untold suffering. He shows them as they truly are, just people, beautiful wonderful people but people none the less. They have no choice but to keep fighting because they are given no other option and because to admit defeat means death.

It is not their struggle that defines them but who they are in spite of it, managing to live and to love and even have fun and laugh. They use every moment given to them in the most beautiful way possible and that is what makes them exceptional.

P.S. I didn't get a signed copy and I couldn't care less.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant start, but humour starts to jar, 6 Aug 2014
This review is from: The Fault in Our Stars (Paperback)
I fear I am about to utter blasphemy: I liked, but didn’t love this book. (I know, I know- you can stone me later.) I don’t really like Young Adult as a genre, so a YA book about two teenagers with cancer didn’t appeal, but then EVERYBODY (and I do mean everybody) was reading it, and tweeting how they were crying at 3am because they were so invested in the characters, so I decided to give it a go. Don’t get me wrong, I can why it was so popular – the sarcasm and challenging of the traditional ‘cancer narrative’ is disarmingly winsome, it has some wonderful lines in, like “I fell in love like you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once”, and I loved it up to about halfway. But then the plot was a little predictable and the sarcasm started feeling a bit preachy.

The plot moves inevitably towards a sad outcome, but the humour continued, and it jarred with me a little. To misquote Ecclesiastes, there is a time for black humour and a time for silence and tears. So I read the whole thing dry-eyed, and though I loved the first half, it left me a little cold. (I am officially the most heartless person in the universe.) I am clearly in the minority, however, so if you like Young Adult as a genre, you’ll probably love this, and it’s pretty cheap.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Suz, 16 Nov 2014
By 
OMG why one star you may say, well because i didn't like this book, simple. Sorry to all the people who are falling over themselves to get the movie or say how heart breakingly brilliant this book is, but i found it boring and repetitive. So many time Grace says how she is suffering from Cancer... so much so its quite insulting to all people that have suffered, are suffering or have lost someone to cancer. The use of language is purely to make it in to a literary sensation, which actually doesn't work... a sixteen year old kid who is suffering from terminal cancer, who has to carry an oxygen tank around with her would actually tell how it is and not fluff with as many big words as a English Literature undergrad would use to impress! There is no really story except to say that Grace goes to a cancer group and meets Gus and then they proceed to disrespect everyone else because they are so bloody amazing people.

I am sorry but i am gutted i have wasted my time on this book and this actually takes a lot for me to write as i never slag off a book, but this is one book i wont even bother with the movie.
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110 of 128 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the fault in our stars, 17 Jan 2012
By 
Ali (Scotland) - See all my reviews
"The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings."
- Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, for those wondering about the title.

I do not know where to start with this review. Actually, I will start by saying this review is completely biased as I consider myself to well and truly be a Nerdfighter (Nerdfighters will love the goat soap, and other, references) and, if I didn't live on another continent, I would totally stalk John Green. Nah, I wouldn't, I'm kidding. I'd stalk Hank. I have a humongous crush on Hank.

Anyways. Moving rather swiftly on.

This book is pretty emotional. John Green said on Tumblr that he wanted the reader "to feel all of the things". Well, I felt all of the things. I laughed (well, snorted - I laugh very rarely at books for some reason), I cried (a common occurrence, believe me), I snorted through my tears (flattering, I assure you). My chest ached with stifled sobbing. I couldn't stop myself reading until I had finished the book. And what a book.

It was not purely a Cancer Book. Yes it features a main character with terminal cancer and another who lost a leg to cancer (and a minor character who has lost his eyes because of cancer). But to me it was not a book that was primarily about dying or even living, it was about love. Romantic love, love between family and friends, love for books (Augustus being a bit of a nerd with his book choice and I loved him for it, as did Hazel) and trashy TV and love for living. Cancer did not define these characters.

Hazel was a great character. Her narrative appealed to me. It was witty and sarcastic without being mean. I enjoyed reading about her slowly, and then quickly, falling in love with Augustus and how and why she didn't want this (her cancer made her a "grenade" - something sure to hurt those around her) and then why she did. I think my favourite part about Hazel though, was her fondness for her parents. They, particularly her mother who had taken up the full-time role of hovering, as Hazel put it, clearly meant a lot to her and were possibly what helped her keep going.

I also liked Augustus (hello new book crush) a lot and the blind jokes he cracked with Isaac. As un-PC as they may be, there was a certain realism in that gallows humour that I enjoyed.

This book dealt with death. There's no getting away from it. It revolved around three teenagers with various types of cancer. It was a sad book. It was also a book that made me think. Think about courage, life, death. It mainly made me think about what happens to those left behind and what happens next. That was what was, and is, going through my mind as I read the story and as I write this jumbled mess of a review. I had the most hellish racking sobs when I realised who would eventually be left behind and how unfair that was.

Is it perfect? Nope. I found the plot a bit predictable, and ridiculous, if I'm being honest. Nothing came as a surprise, I saw it coming. The characters dialogue got on my wick a few times. The whole book quote thing and philosophising is fine in small doses but I wanted a few more typical teenagery conversations. These were small, minor niggly things though.

But do you know what? I don't care. The above issues didn't really dampen my overall enjoyment of this novel and I stick by my rating for it. I loved this book and I will eagerly await the next John Green novel.

Thank you, John Green, for ruining the next few books I read. They will just not compare to The Fault in Our Stars.

DFTBA.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I thought this was supposed to be good??, 15 Nov 2014
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Why is this getting so many good reviews? I'm mystified! The writing is atrocious and the characterisations are a joke. Why do both Hazel and Gus speak in such a silly pretentious way all the time? Are we really supposed to accept that stupid novelist Peter Van Whatsit as a believable person? (he talks in a silly pretentious way too). Is this book intended to be moving, romantic, profound, or what? It didn't reach me on any level and I thought it a complete waste of time.

The romance between Hazel and Gus just didn't ring true - none of the relationships in the book did. It's like it was written by somebody who grew up in total isolation from the rest of the human race and consequently had absolutely no idea how people talk, act, or think.

Obviously thousands of fans are going to disagree with me, but personally I thought this story positively stank.
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The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (Paperback - 3 Jan 2013)
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