Customer Reviews


 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real gem
Picture
On the morning of her wedding, Pell leaves her bed before any of her family wakes. She gathers her belongings, lays out her wedding dress and leaves. Taking her horse, Jack and her mute brother Bean, who refuses to be left behind, she abandons the life of misery and servitude that she saw her mother lead after marriage. A few years of hardship and motherhood...
Published on 18 Jan. 2010 by www.kidscompass.co.uk

versus
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointing
Having read and loved How I Live Now by this author, I was expecting something of the same calibre with The Bride's Farewell. Unfortunately, I was a bit disappointed.

This is the story of Pell Ridley, a girl who runs away from home on her wedding day, to avoid being tied down to local man Birdie, a man she has been destined to marry for years. He's a good...
Published on 19 Jan. 2010 by Nicola in South Yorkshire


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real gem, 18 Jan. 2010
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Hardcover)
Picture
On the morning of her wedding, Pell leaves her bed before any of her family wakes. She gathers her belongings, lays out her wedding dress and leaves. Taking her horse, Jack and her mute brother Bean, who refuses to be left behind, she abandons the life of misery and servitude that she saw her mother lead after marriage. A few years of hardship and motherhood before an inevitable early death is not her idea of a golden future, so she has decided break free. The trio head for the town of Salisbury and the huge horse fair where Pell hopes to find work. Things don't turn out quite like she planned and before long she's not only penniless but has also lost her brother and horse. What follows is a long and exhausting journey to somehow retrieve them. On her travels she comes across a taciturn poacher called Dogman and before long is living in his cowshed. Romance blooms when he finds her injured after being beaten. But with Bean still lost and more tragedies heading her way, there is little chance of rest for Pell who has a harsh lesson to learn; sometimes your decisions can have unforeseen and terrible consequences.

As usual, Meg Rosoff has crafted a beautifully written story. At times it is so realistic you almost feel like you're standing at Pell's shoulder. You can also expect plenty of twists and turns to the plot with a rather mysterious gypsy woman holding the key to the final conclusion. In fact, the plot is so intertwined that most events are sparked by the same few characters who are all frailly linked together.

There is a beautiful and yet serene love story to The Bride's Farewell. If you're expecting passionate embraces and agonised feelings then you will be disappointed as with all the tragedies that occur in her life, Pell takes everything on the chin. Despite the story being very sad in places, it never falls into bleakness and is more often than not a bittersweet experience.
A strong moral aspect of the book highlights the small mindedness of others as many lead bitter enclosed lives, resenting those who have the courage to make something better of themselves.

There is a real gem hidden here which will grow on you in rather a disquieting way. It works on you in the reading, and it could take a few days before you realise just how much you enjoyed it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars romance and ponies - and some great writing, 6 Nov. 2009
By 
Amanda Craig "Amanda Craig" (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Hardcover)
Ever since How I Live Now, Meg Rosoff has been a unique voice describing the strength and pain of being young, but every novel is very different. The Bride's Farewell is her fourth, set in the 19th century and told in the third person. Her heroine, Pell, is a preacher's daughter who creeps out of bed on the morning of her wedding day, determined to reject a life of misery as the wife of dull-witted Birdie. Her two-roomed home in Nomansland is full of children and the future offered her by Birdie is easy to reject ("she had only to look at her mother - worn and shapeless with a leaking bladder, great knotted blue veins, and breasts flat as old wineskins") but she is immediately encumbered during her flight by her mute younger brother Bean. Will she abandon him, or become his saviour?

A read as exhilarating as a ride across the moors, Rosoff's novel is rich in the emotional landscape of the untamed female heart. Pell encounters kindness and crooks, gypsies and horse-thieves and a handsome, taciturn hunter called Dogman. A born horse whisperer, she finds she can earn a living of sorts - but then Bean is taken from her, and to save him from certain death in the workhouse and to find her stolen pony, she and her lurcher have to travel many weary miles, discovering certain secrets about her own family's history.
The Bride's Farewell has elements of Daphne du Maurier's Jamaica Inn, Tess of the d'Urbervilles and a good number of Flambard books, yet Rosoff's vivid, pared-down style brings it closer to a kind of Western. Every sentence is crafted and weighted with beauty, whether describing the city of Salisbury ("Beyond the city walls to the north, Pell could see the tip of the lacy cathedral spire rising up towards heaven, while here on earth, stinking sewage collected in ditches beside the road"), hypocrisy or meanness. I'd have liked a little bit more of the romance with Dogman - it's only because another girl tells us so that we realise he's handsome, and he's just a bit too taciturn. But Pell is a terrific heroine, and as she journeys across a landscape that is also that of her passage from girl to woman she becomes something bigger than the heroine of a pony book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Goodbye and Hello - The Bride's Farewell by Meg Rosoff, 2 Sept. 2009
By 
Jamieson Villeneuve "Author at Large" (Ottawa Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Hardcover)
I have just finished an amazing book.

It is part fairy tale, part love story. It is a cross between Charles Dickens and Lemony Snicket. It is part Brothers Grimm and part historical melodrama.

In other words, it is unclassifiable.

I am speaking of The Bride's Farewell, the new novel by the New York Bestselling, Carnigie Award Winning author Meg Rosoff. This is her fourth novel for young adults, but even there I would say that genre does not suit her.

Meg's novels are for young adults in that they feature a younger cast of characters. But the themes her books deal with are much more adult; incredibly darker and moodier than most juvenile fiction published today.

Her first novel, How I Live Now, featured a young girl and her cousin that have survived a bombing in a future not unlike ours; and fell in love. Her second novel, Just In Case, concerns a boy who, to escape Fate, reinvents himself; he even imagines an invisible dog for himself that other people can see. Her third novel, What I Was, can be described as a boarding house love story between two boys.

Quite obviously, Meg Rosoff never writes the same book twice.

I was eagerly awaiting to see what Meg Rosoff would give us with The Bride's Farewell. I wondered what the setting would be. In Rosoff's novels, the characters and the place around them play equally important roles.

She is a beautiful storyteller. For me, she seems to have written each of her books carefully, choosing each word so that it feels right. Though her books may be short in length (each of her four novels are around the 200 something page count), the emotion and the power in her novels makes the books feel stronger, somehow; more vibrant.

I'm always a little nervous when I begin a Meg Rosoff novel. Since no two stories are the same, I wonder where she is going to take me; what story she is going to tell. Her novels remind me of the novel in verse books written by Ellen Hopkins. Though Rosoff writes in prose, her books mirror Hopkins' in that they always present us with stories that are engaging, beautifully written and emotionally charged. And each time you open one of their novels you wonder where you are going to end up.

When I read a Meg Rosoff novel, I treat the book as if I am pursuing a gem. So clearly I had high expectations for The Bride's Farewell. Meg Rosoff's new novel has been one of my most anticipated reads of 2009.

I am delighted to say that I was not disappointed in the least.

Quite the contrary, in fact. I think that The Bride's Farewell is Rosoff's best book to date. It concerns sixteen year old Pell Ridley who runs away from her home on her wedding day in the year of eighteen hundred and fifty something.

She leaves home with only her horse Jack and her brother Bean, a boy who does not speak. What she returns with is so much more.

I won't say any more of the plot then that, only to say that you should experience the story as I did. Meg Rosoff writes novels that are not just merely read; they are explored. Each page brings you deeper into the story of Pell and what happens to her that, by the end, you will never want to leave her world.

Ultimately, The Brides Farewell is really about three things: It is about family and courage. And the incredible power of love.

Through stunning words, vivid imagery, Meg Rosoff has given us a delightful historical novel that reminds us of something important.

She reminds us that we cannot get where we are going, if we do not remember where we came from.

Though the book may seem grim at times, The Bride's Farewell is ultimately a joyous novel about the search for who we are and the happiness we find at discovering our place in the world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars People, horses and dogs brilliantly portrayed in a great story, 24 Mar. 2012
By 
Victoria Eveleigh "Tortie" (Exmoor, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Paperback)
I loved this book, and I can't help feeling that some of the people who've given it bad reviews are missing the point. This is a thought-provoking and refreshingly honest read, with clever observations about many things, including human nature. And there are morals to be drawn, if you like morals. For instance (without wanting to give the story away) when Pell goes home she realises a few things about her quest for freedom, and when she finally finds her horse her decision is unexpected and admirable.
As a farmer and country-dweller who loves horses and dogs, this book was a breath of fresh air because the dogs and horses actually behave like real dogs and horses. Also, things like hunting and poaching are portrayed as an integral part of country life - neither particularly wicked nor particularly romantic (although the poacher is pretty romantic if you like the tough, silent type).
I've always been fascinated by Romanies, and for some time I owned a vardo, so I enjoyed the Romany angle to the story too.
The ending fitted perfectly, although I didn't want the book to end.
All in all, this is a brilliantly written, subtle story that gets under your skin and makes you wonder about all sorts of things. I'm now going to go and read Meg Rosoff's other books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not at all my usual Book. What a joyous surprise!, 27 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Paperback)
I usually read thrillers or police procedurals and political biographies and the like. I need something to think about as well as entertain and, surprisingly, in this book found both - so seductively. Meg Rosoff's lyrical prose carries one along effortlessly and, by the time I was into it, I could not put the book down. Maybe it was a little slow at the beginning but, after a while I was caught up with the characters and had to know what happened to them.

I think this is a fine work of the imagination and the characters created, on the margins of society, lived for me with absolute authenticity. It is both fascinating and emotionally stirring and thank goodness for the happy ending! I would have been devastated otherwise!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars i loved it, 18 July 2012
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Paperback)
meg rosoff is an amazing writer. I probably don't appreciate all her books as much as i should but she always amazes me how she makes up these characters and seems to understand people, men and women alike. the bride's farewell is so insightful into life in the olden days (not sure of the date). It's amazing for me to see how people lived. people were so poor and a lot were mean, with hypocritical morals. we have it so easy now. but i couldn't have enjoyed reading it if it hadn't been for the kind people and that she lives with dogman. i liked the ending and i liked the character of bean and his attached friend/sister. I've just read it again and enjoyed it again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rosoff on Fine Form, 12 Jun. 2011
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Hardcover)
I love Rosoff's writing. This period novel is somewhat of a departure from her previous output, but no worse for that. I thought it was a well told, highly engaging story with a fantastically strong female heroine in the shape of Pell. It is romantic without being soppy, and adventurous without being over the top. I loved the social commentary on what happens to young women who don't fit the accepted role society has carved out for them? How do they find their way? How do they manage when all around them are judging them? I read this book in a day it was so compelling.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this author, 12 Jun. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Paperback)
I love this author and her books are amazing, I wanted this book for my collection, so I purchased from the seller, it was in excellent condition, had barely been read at all, and I would certainly buy from this seller in the future should this author write any more books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointing, 19 Jan. 2010
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Hardcover)
Having read and loved How I Live Now by this author, I was expecting something of the same calibre with The Bride's Farewell. Unfortunately, I was a bit disappointed.

This is the story of Pell Ridley, a girl who runs away from home on her wedding day, to avoid being tied down to local man Birdie, a man she has been destined to marry for years. He's a good man, but Pell wants freedom and doesn't want to end up like her mum, giving birth year after year and becoming worn out.

She takes her younger brother, Bean, with her and her horse Jack, and sets out on her way. She ends up at the Salisbury horse fair, but events take a turn for the worse and she ends up losing money, Bean and Jack. The remainder of the story is about her learning to survive on her own in the world, and trying to find out what happened to her lost brother and horse.

Somehow, although this book sounded good on paper, I had a real struggle to engage with it at all. I'm glad it is such a short book otherwise I think I would have found it hard to get to the end of it. Pell is a very feisty heroine, but the other characters didn't make much of an impact. Nice idea, but it just didn't work for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Good read!, 3 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Bride's Farewell (Paperback)
Meg Rosoff has a great imagination in her writing. I always know I shall be entertained by her stories. This one is no exception. I came to like her after reading her brilliant book 'The Last Girl'. First class!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Bride's Farewell
The Bride's Farewell by Meg Rosoff (Paperback - 3 Jun. 2010)
£5.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews