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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Triss, 22 Nov 2004
This review is from: Triss: Bk. 1 (Tale of Redwall) (Paperback)
TRISS is an amazing story about a brave young squirrel named Triss who is enslaved by the evil ferret King Agarnu of Riftgard and his equally evil daughter, Kurda. But secretly Triss is planning a daring escape by sea........ Brian Jacques is my personal favourite author I would reccomend his books to anyone over ten years old who likes animal and adventure stories. Filled with excitement, adventure,heartbreaking deaths and wild battle scenes. TRISS is the 15th book in the REDWALL series.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brian's Best Book, 4 Feb 2003
By A Customer
This is the best Redwall book so far, but The Taggerung is not far behind. It is a heart-breaking tale of a young mousmaid called Triss and her two companions on a far away island and making a great escape to Redwall. I would like to congratulate Brian on writing so many brilliant Redwall novels without keeping the story line the same. I would reccomend this book to anyone between 10 and 17. Enjoy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Redwall rules, 20 Sep 2013
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I've been reading the Redwall series of books for many years and think they are brilliant stories for all ages.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The best Redwall book since the original., 14 Mar 2005
This is another of Brian jacques' gems. Great for anyone who likes a bit of action
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Solid Entry to the Series..., 20 July 2004
"Triss" is most definitely a very enjoyable "Tale of Redwall"; it has an excellent plot, a vivid cast of character and that indefinable charm that permeates every book in the series. While it does initially seem to play with some ideas already visited in the series it manages to move in an unexpected direction that makes this story feel fresh.
The plot can very easily be broken down into three converging strands:
First, we meet Triss the squirrelmaid, Welfo the hogmaid and Shogg the otter as they try to escape from slavery under King Agarnu the Pure Ferret of the northern kingdom of Riftguard. However, there is more to worry the royal mind than this as he sends his two children Princess Kurda and Prince Bladd on a mission to retrieve what he lost many seasons ago, a trinket without which he not by rights king.
Second are more would-be runaways Sagax, son of Lord Hightor and Lady Merola of Salamandastron and next in line to rule the fire mountain, and his childhood friend Scarum. Both are young and immature and, while set on adventure, know little of the outside world, so they decide to join up with the experienced wavedog, Kroova, and sail away with him in his boat.
Meanwhile the way of life of Redwallers is threatened by the discovery of a nameless terror dwelling in the newly discovered ruins of Brockhall, ancient home of the BadgerLords. This mystery is somehow connected to Riftguard and all that is happening there and it is only a matter of time before the true situation is revealed.
"Triss" is certainly one of the less grim entries to the series and while characters sometimes dance with death it is a merry jig woven with riddles, mystery and humour. Indeed, it has been described by some as the funniest "Tales of Redwall" yet and this has won the affection of many fans. There are some fans that are dissatisfied with the level of humour, feeling it has displaced plot and left it a poorer tale for it, but this reviewer finds it hard to agree with this point of view. Comic incidents are not frivolously included and generally contribute to character development or the plot as a whole. Scarum's antics not only raise a chuckle but also questions about where these two young creatures' friendship is heading.
The theme of growing up is one that runs throughout the series but it presented in a new and interesting way here. As our two trios of heroes, Triss, Shogg and Welfo and Sagax, Kroova and Scarum, make their journeys Brian cleverly engineers it so that we a see a key dynamic mirrored between them: Kroova and Shogg move into the roles of father to their respective groups watching over the younger beasts, while Triss, Welfo, Sagax and Scarum make decisions about who they are and what their future is. After a life of subservience and slavery the choice lies before Triss and Welfo: Do they rise up in the defence of others and protect others from such suffering or do they seek peace away from the warring world? Sagax and Bescarum must too take a long hard look at themselves: Will they cling to their childish ways or face up to their responsibilities? While the right answers would appear to be the former and the latter respectively, Brian does not condemn those who make the other choice and shows them as likeable if not exactly heroic.
What is interesting to note is how Brian depicts his heroes in this novel. The idea of proving oneself is no longer that central, rather it is about letting go of the friendships and comforts of childhood and accepting the future.
However, this is also a book filled very much with mystery and a rather enchanting one at that, which gives the tale a unity when at times it feels like we have three very separate plots. There is a good sense of a forgotten past and it adds an added layer of suspense and intrigue to the novel.
The naming of the book does seem to me somewhat inappropriate. The presence of the first female to wield the sword of Martin is obviously a big crowd-pleaser but in truth she is but one of a greatly varied ensemble cast in a sprawling tale. If one takes Triss as being what the entire tale is all about then one might feel a little disappointed for she is but one part of a greater tapestry of characters and plot.
All in all "Triss" has much to offer the loyal fan and the first time reader and provides a nice variation on the standard "Tale of Redwall".
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars triss, 6 April 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Triss: Bk. 1 (Tale of Redwall) (Paperback)
i really liked this book and i advise you to buy it, it is one of brian jacques best books i have read and i have read most of them it is very enjoyable to read and if you are the kind of person who likes to get stuck into a book i advise this book it has about 400 pages and has its fair share of the usual redwall songs and it also has puzzles in to solve and a secret code and again it is a very good book READ IT!!!!!!!!!!!
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Triss: Bk. 1 (Tale of Redwall)
Triss: Bk. 1 (Tale of Redwall) by Brian Jacques (Paperback - 6 Mar 2003)
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