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5.0 out of 5 stars Persona/mask
A "persona" in the standard vernacular, refers to a social role or character performed by an actor. The word is thought to have derived from Latin, where it's original meaning referred to a theatrical mask. The Latin word probably has it's roots in the Etruscan word "Phersu" which had the same meaning*. In the study of communication, persona is a term used to describe the...
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much philosophising
After reading the superb Woman in the Dunes, I wanted to read more Abe Kobo, but so far this has led to disappointment. This is better than Inter-Ice Age 4 but it spends far too much time philosophising and far too little time on the action.

The best bit by far comes at the end of the novel, in which something from earlier on, initially presented as incidental,...
Published on 12 Nov 2007 by Greshon


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5.0 out of 5 stars Persona/mask, 15 July 2012
This review is from: The Face of Another (Paperback)
A "persona" in the standard vernacular, refers to a social role or character performed by an actor. The word is thought to have derived from Latin, where it's original meaning referred to a theatrical mask. The Latin word probably has it's roots in the Etruscan word "Phersu" which had the same meaning*. In the study of communication, persona is a term used to describe the versions of self that all individuals possess, with behaviours selected like masks according to the impression an individual wishes to project when interacting with others. Therefore, "personas" presented to other people will vary according to the social environment a person is engaged in and the persona presented before others will differ from the one an individual will display when they happen to be alone. According to Carl Jung whilst a child is growing, the development of a viable social persona is a vital part of adapting to and in preparation for adult life in the external social world - 'A strong ego relates to the outside world through a flexible persona; identification with a specific persona (doctor, scholar, artist, etc.) inhibits psychological development'. For Jung the danger was that people become identical with their personas (the doctor with his stethoscope, the conductor with her baton ) resulting in what could be a shallow, brittle, conformist kind of personality which is "all mask".

The Face of Another (1964) was Kobe Abe's first major novel after the success of The Women in the Dunes (1962) and like that book follows the theme of the modern individuals alienation with the society they live in. The novel tells the story of a scientist so hideously disfigured by Keloid* scars - the result of a failed laboratory experiment - that his whole face is covered in bandages and his wife finds his image disgusting. He comes up with a plan of creating a mask, with the aim of seducing his wife as another man, all the while documenting everything in a series of notebooks. The first part sees him planning and building the mask, which is so realistic that it appears to fool everyone, save for one girl who, although we are told is intellectually challenged, still recognises that the man in the mask and the man in the bandages are one and the same.

The narrative is expressed in first person through three separate coloured notebooks, although we are told that there is no reason behind this beyond a means in which to distinguish them apart. It is through them that we follow this faceless individual viewing what seems to be a dissection of his every thought, or the peeling away of layers of his psyche, but is actually multiplying the veneer on his mask, removing himself further from his expressed aim and building more masks in which to confine himself. As the tale progresses it's as though the mask takes over, this starts slowly as his confidence in the mask grows, until it becomes a force that isolates him far more than his scarred face ever did. He, or the mask, finally get confident enough to meet his wife and is soon dismayed and angered by how easy it was to seduce her, in fact so convinced is he in his role as "mask" that he believes her sexual act with him, places her in the role of the unfaithful spouse who was so easily seduced from her marital vows and as such can be written down, catalogued and defined, before being rejected.

As I stated before, this is all played out through the three notebooks in which the scientist records and dissects minutiae of his existence, where every sentence, every page adds more layers to his mask, thereby transforming his face into a shield with which to protect himself, an anonymous faceless eye observing without being seen, reduced to a voyeuristic gaze living among millions of strangers, who although close neighbours, are faces he does not recognise - symbolising the fundamental facelessness of contemporary man lost in an ocean of complete anonymity.

"Just a minute! The plans for the mask were not the only thing. The fate of having lost my face and of being obliged to depend on a mask was in itself not exceptional, but was rather a destiny I shared with contemporary man, wasn't it? A trivial discovery indeed. For my despair lay in my fate, rather than in my loss of face; it lay in the fact that I did not have the slightest thing in common with other men. I envied even a cancer victim, because he shares something with other men. If this turned out to be untrue, the hole into which I had fallen was not an abandoned well provided with an emergency escape; it was a penitentiary cell, recognized by everyone but me"

Towards the end of this novel, the impressions of his wife, are replaced by another beautiful face, seen in a film the protagonist saw whilst hiding out in a cinema - this girl has one side of her face an ideal of perfection, the other a mass of keloidal scarring. Here is a face of Hibakusha*, a survivor of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. Although half-destroyed by this scarring, her face is striking, displaying a beauty which the scientist could observe protected by the darkness of the cinema from the gaze of others and only through this visage does his own scarring cease to be a personal tragedy and can become an emblem of post-war Japan, which had not yet found a way to escape the memories of war.

This book is also a love story - a man trying to reconnect with his wife and yet is lost amongst the masks he has built around himself, the layers and barriers through which he peers, searching for a pathway back to when there was a connection, a point when the masks although not totally removed, were slid to one side and one glanced at the nakedness of the other. By the final pages of this book we are left with an image of this individual alone amongst millions, trapped by his own creation, left trying to rationalize a way forward and yet still adding layers to his mask.

Kobo Abe through his work as an Avant-garde novelist and playwright, has been compared to the likes of Franz Kafka and Alberto Moravia and like Kafka there is an apparent clinical detachment in the writing, as though Abe's medical background has had a direct influence upon his writing style and yet with this there is also an elegance that makes this novel an immensely enjoyable and also an incredibly satisfying read - on all levels.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the effort required, 10 July 2010
This review is from: The Face of Another (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
I read this book having read one other Abe book (The Ark Sakura) and having seen the movie Face of Another by Hiroshi Teshigahara. Perhaps this helped me persevere with the effort that is admittedly required in getting through some of the more obscure philosophical passages in this book. The longwindedness of these musings seems to serve more than the immediate purpose of philosophy; it also portrays the mental torture that the protaganist inflicts upon himself through his over-analysis of his condition.

Abe was surely a genius and I have rarely read a book so provocative regarding personality. In that sense it seems to have something in common to, say, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. I would not claim to fully understand the book of course but I do think that it is much more about personality than being some sort of allegory about post-war Japan as has been suggested.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slow-going at first but well worth it!, 8 July 1999
By A Customer
I initially found this novel hard to respect since the central theme of a man and his mask seemed trite and a cliche. However this setup does allow the novel's main character to seduce his wife, posing as a stranger; a strange social situation which was described with much empathy and insight by Abe.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much philosophising, 12 Nov 2007
This review is from: The Face of Another (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
After reading the superb Woman in the Dunes, I wanted to read more Abe Kobo, but so far this has led to disappointment. This is better than Inter-Ice Age 4 but it spends far too much time philosophising and far too little time on the action.

The best bit by far comes at the end of the novel, in which something from earlier on, initially presented as incidental, is revealed. The meaning of the novel is expanded, and the narrator's scarred face becomes a metaphor for a Japan ravaged by WW2.
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The Face of Another (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Face of Another (Penguin Modern Classics) by Kobo Abe (Paperback - 28 Sep 2006)
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