Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and tantalising unfinished novel
The Last Tycoon is what we have of F. Scott Fitzgerald's final novel, tentatively titled The Love of the Last Tycoon, which was uncompleted on his death, of a heart attack, in 1940. Fitzgerald had been working in Hollywood for some years at this point, and his familiarity with the milieu makes for an outsider's view informed by an insider's knowledge of the studio system...
Published on 26 July 2010 by Paul Bowes

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A little bit of romance...
This is fairly short at 160 pages or so. Seems the author intended this to be about twice the length, going by the notes at the end. The actual novel, in its unfinished form I'd say is ok, not amazing. The fact, that, it's set in Hollywood and centred around it, is no big deal, in my opinion. The best part of the novel is the romantic relationship between M Stahr and the...
Published 22 months ago by F Drew


Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and tantalising unfinished novel, 26 July 2010
By 
Paul Bowes (Wales, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
The Last Tycoon is what we have of F. Scott Fitzgerald's final novel, tentatively titled The Love of the Last Tycoon, which was uncompleted on his death, of a heart attack, in 1940. Fitzgerald had been working in Hollywood for some years at this point, and his familiarity with the milieu makes for an outsider's view informed by an insider's knowledge of the studio system on the eve of of the Second World War. The central character, Monroe Stahr, is modelled loosely on Irving Thalberg, the 'Boy Wonder' producer who had died in 1936 at the age of only 37. However, much of the story as it exists is narrated or 'reconstructed' by Cecilia Brady, the daughter of one of Stahr's partners and rivals and herself a member of the studio aristocracy.

Unfinished novels are necessarily a minority taste, but anyone who likes Fitzgerald will have to read this. In addition to the surviving novella-length text, this edition presents a very full section of notes which compiles all the surviving material of relevance, allowing the reader to assemble a view of what the completed book might have been like. Even without this additional material, the completed chapters hold the interest continuously. Fitzgerald's view of how films are really made is revelatory, the minor characters are memorable, and the romantic triangle between Stahr, Cecilia and the mysterious Kathleen Moore is beautifully developed.

It's worth pointing out that even in its fragmentary state The Last Tycoon is regularly cited as one of the best novels of Hollywood ever written. It certainly gives the lie to the notion that Fitzgerald had by this point laid waste to his talent with alcohol. We can only wonder what he might have given us had he survived a little longer: the surviving draft text suggests that the completed novel might have rivalled Gatsby.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I would have loved to see the final version, 9 Aug 2010
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
I enjoyed also the notes at the end of the book regarding the development of the characters.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Glimpses, 14 May 2011
By 
Christian (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
This was Fitzgerald's ultimate book as he died whilst writing it. It contains the unfinished script as it stood as well as notes on what would have come, and the changes from the original vision.

The script is a tale of the conflict between two men at the heart of Hollywood and the battle over the soul and direction of the movie business. It is a tale that mixes love, lust, business and the struggle between boss and workers.

Without the notes, this feels much like a book half finished; lots of threads have been started but none of them have woven together. The notes confirm the direction to come and provide satisfaction at least that this book truly could have been great. Without the unwritten chapters, it shows glimpses of what could have been.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Wish it were finished!, 22 April 2014
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
This had the potential to be equal in genius to 'Tender is the Night' or 'Great Gatsby' if it had been completed. I just wish he'd managed to finish it because the notes for the remainder of the book looked fascinating and I'd have liked to see how it developed. An interesting array of characters and situations and the atmosphere Fitzgerald creates is typical of his novels though slightly different. I can't put my finger on it but it was more disenchanted and resigned. Well worth a read if you are a voracious FSF reader. If only it were completed...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great shame he was unable to finish this masterpiece., 25 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
Quite simply I get the feel that it would have been his greatest work, more coherent than Tender and a lot more focused. Had he time he probably would have amended what we're given here but even so his characters are brilliantly drawn and the writing flows beautifully. It is a pleasure to get to know these characters, nice and nasty, as far as we're allowed to. The author obviously has extensive knowledge of the "picture" industry and he carries us through his sets, offices, meetings, passions with ease. Sadly, he dismisses us part way through our visit.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars A little bit of romance..., 29 Sep 2012
By 
F Drew (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
This is fairly short at 160 pages or so. Seems the author intended this to be about twice the length, going by the notes at the end. The actual novel, in its unfinished form I'd say is ok, not amazing. The fact, that, it's set in Hollywood and centred around it, is no big deal, in my opinion. The best part of the novel is the romantic relationship between M Stahr and the coy, sort of enigmatic Kathleen; the movie stuff is fairly incidental.

The writing is very good in parts, very subtle, at times sad and moving. Romance, or failed romance, was, of course, the author's main preoccupation. While that aspect of the writing is enjoyable, large parts of the novel are fairly ordinary. Stahr sits in a room with movie people, watching screen tests; doesn't like them, gives orders to change them; has a slightly fearsome presence etc... Does that make it the great, definitive novel on Hollywood? Some would like you to think so.

I liked it, but don't feel there is anything exceptional about it. I can't compare it to 'The Great Gatsby' as I read that ages ago, but it's spurred me on to read 'Tender is the Night'.

There's a short and pompous introduction to the book, by friend and fellow writer Edmund Wilson, which is frankly nonsense. He claims it's FSF's most mature work and a true landmark in modern literature and other such daft stuff... Actually, it's just a story about a guy that makes films, falls for a good looking woman and discovers he can't have her. Nothing more, nothing less...

Still, not a bad read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but incomplete, 3 Nov 2012
This review is from: The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
An unfinished novel that held much promise. Quite interesting and quite well written as far as it goes. Worth reading but it only tells half the story and who knows how it might have turned out?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Last Tycoon (Penguin Modern Classics) by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Paperback - 31 Jan 2002)
6.29
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews