Customer Reviews


91 Reviews
5 star:
 (53)
4 star:
 (21)
3 star:
 (10)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating and horrifying
Miller's title is appropriate for the play. He creates an atmosphere and mood in the play that is significant to the time that the Salem witch hunt took place and of the Puritan culture. Miller successfully captures the religious fanaticism of the period and adds it effectively to the play. I would recommend this play to everyone. It is very different to miller's other...
Published on 18 Oct 2000

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Just what i needed
Not much to say about the book except from... if you are studying this at school for literature (in which case, unlucky) this is exactly what you need. That's about it....
Published 9 months ago by Steve


‹ Previous | 16 7 8 9 10 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 13 Nov 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
Greatest play ever written - end of!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 24 Oct 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
Good, using it for my higher english
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Crucible, 26 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Crucible (Hardcover)
Very good price and quick delivery.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Historical and the real story, 29 Nov 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
The main plot is about the Salem witch trials in 1692, in the midst of this there is a sub plot where John Proctor(leading man)tries to reveal the truth. While doing this he faces many obstacles such as his lechery, the court's workings, the mass hysteria and theocracy. A good play linking with McCarthyism in the 1950's where they too caused chaos with the use of fear. A historical telling of the stories behind the Salem with trials.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 11 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Crucible (Hardcover)
Wanted for school.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Terrible Kindle Edition, 15 Nov 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought the Kindle edition of this book, and because I knew the play I made the mistake of not getting a sample first. That was a mistake. The editing on this is absolutely awful. The text is riddled with spelling mistakes, so much so that it really diminishes the pleasure of reading it. The edition also contains no extra material, no foreword, no appendix and the scene which is usually omitted in production and which the hard copy includes is also missing. All in all very disappointing, especially from such a reputable publisher.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 21 Sep 2014
This review is from: The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback)
such a great deal
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Show honor now, show a stony heart and sink them with it.", 22 July 2004
By 
Mary Whipple (New England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
When John Proctor says these words to his wife Elizabeth at the conclusion of this play, he has faced accusations of being in league with the Devil and is ready to face consequences meted out by the religious tribunal he has faced. Though he has sinned by committing adultery with Abigail Williams, he believes the witchcraft trials which have ultimately consumed him to be the result of human, rather than godly, forces. Playwright Arthur Miller sets the scene for this action in an Overture explaining the theocracy which controlled Salem. Powerful clergymen, some more rigid in their interpretations of Scripture than others, "protected" citizens by enforcing conformity with the church's teachings.
Through detailed character sketches inserted into the structure of the play, Miller broadens the realism, and when a group of hysterical young women makes accusations of witchcraft, resulting ultimately in the deaths of nineteen of their fellow-citizens, Miller has prepared his audience to accept the trials and the behavior of the characters as plausible. His straightforward prose, use of homely details, and simple sentence structure (despite its archaic tone) further add to the realism. When the affair between John Proctor and Abigail Williams, who precipitates and then promotes the hysteria among the young "afflicted" girls, is revealed within the play, the modern reader is given a "hook" with which to identify with characters and situations which might otherwise feel foreign.
Miller's play is a powerful revelation of themes involving mass hysteria, fear of the unknown, and a belief in the essential evil hidden within the hearts of men. As the accused are required to prove their innocence, questions regarding the role of individualism within this society, its intolerance of differences, its justice as defined by the state and by clergymen who differ, and the hysteria which grows from repression all surface within the dramatic action, leading to an intensity of feeling rare in modern theater. When John Proctor is faced with a choice of telling the truth and being sentenced to death or lying and being saved, the ironies of the play are fully revealed.
Written in 1952, slightly before the McCarthy era, Miller's depiction of these trials presages the McCarthy hearings and illustrates his belief that the fear of Communism is the equivalent of fear of the Devil in colonial times. Miller, however, has selected facts which illustrate his point of view and his themes, making no pretense of accuracy regarding the witchcraft trials themselves. In reality, Abigail Williams was eleven, and John Proctor was sixty, quite different from the dramatic circumstances here. Mary Whipple
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 3 Nov 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Crucible (Hardcover)
Excellent book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 14 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Crucible (Hardcover)
good condition
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 16 7 8 9 10 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts (Penguin Modern Classics)
The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts (Penguin Modern Classics) by Arthur Miller (Paperback - 24 Feb 2000)
£7.19
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews