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4.0 out of 5 stars Pity About The Dialogue!
The Templars' Quest is a novel written with a broad sweep of academic and arcane knowledge added to a vibrant imagination. This a great story on many counts. How could it fail? Fascinatingly complex, it offers a powerful secret society, a long-lost artefact, a tough marine, and a vulnerable and grieving young mother pulled into a maelstrom against implacable foes...
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Appalling
The real disappointment here is the fact that this is a potentially great story very, very badly told. Thin on plot with rent-a-stereotype characterisation and possibly the most hackneyed dialogue it's been my misfortune to encounter in quite some time, there is virtually nothing to redeem it.

I don't mind suspending my disbelief for an incredible storytline -...
Published on 29 April 2013 by M Norman


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Appalling, 29 April 2013
The real disappointment here is the fact that this is a potentially great story very, very badly told. Thin on plot with rent-a-stereotype characterisation and possibly the most hackneyed dialogue it's been my misfortune to encounter in quite some time, there is virtually nothing to redeem it.

I don't mind suspending my disbelief for an incredible storytline - Lord knows I've done it often enough for the likes of Stephen King and James Herbert - but at least some small part of the story has to be rooted in partial credibility. In short, even at its most extreme one has to at least believe it COULD, in some small way, be plausible.

Not so here. Palov blows that the moment her(frankly absurd) English scholar Caedmon Asquith makes his discovery in the mountains of southern France - a find that is so easy, one wonders why it's taken two thousand years achieve. In fact, so idiotically hackneyed is Asquith as a character, it's hard to decide which is the more ridiculous - the find or the fact it's made by someone so otherwise monumentally stupid.

The dialogue is contrived, laughably gung-ho (but absent of any of the 'cool' that would make it acceptable) and plodding. Asquith aside, the two remaining central characters - Finn McGuire and Kate Bauer - are thoroughly irritating. McGuire is all-American macho stereotypical nonsense with none of the panache of, say, Jack Reacher whilst Bauer has nothing in common with that other Jack of the same name. She spends her time weeping, screaming, shrieking, helpless or all four at once. Any self-respecting, mission-focussed special forces soldier would dump her as quickly as humanly possible. Instead, McGuire (all-too conveniently, easily and quickly) manages to fall in love with this simpering, whimpering human burden.

And Asquith? An Englishman written from a point of total ignorance by an American who, on this evidence at least, appears never to have met anyone from England. I'm English. I've spent all my life being English, listening to English people and meeting English people. I have never - ever - met anyone who behaves or speaks like this moron. Most insulting of all, perhaps, is the fact Palov thinks this is the sort of pointless individual who populates the British secret service. I mean, I know we got our noses bloodied by Philby and his pals back in the 60s, but...Asquith? Working for MI5? Really...? It's about as preposterous as Jon Bon Jovi discovering the Enigma machine.

I'm not even going to start on the bad guys. It's enough to say that no matter how ridiculous they are - and, make no mistake, they ARE ridiculous - they're a damn sight more believable than the heroes.

Beyond the now well-known links between the Knights Templar and the Holy Grail, this has absolutely nothing to do with the Templars or any quest upon which they may at some point have embarked. There's more of Simon Templar than the Knights Templar about this pile of hokum - though that probably does a disservice to the wonderful Leslie Charteris.

There are too many good books out there to waste your time with the bad ones. Do yourself a favour and avoid this.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not what it says on the tin, 12 Nov. 2011
By 
A. J. Bradbury "Andy B." (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Templars Quest (Paperback)
In a nutshell, the title of this book is more or less completely misleading. That is to say, it has very little to do with the knights templar, and what there is cannot be treated as reliable.

More importantly, given that the book is just over 500 pages long, there is remarkably little plot, and the characters are all pure cardboard/stereotypes. In fact, in my opinion this book reads like it was written by a computer that had been fed all the other recent novels and pseudo-histories of this kind , given an incredibly thin plot to build on, and instructed to flesh the story out with anything that sounded sufficiently loopy to attract unsuspecting readers.

This is yet another book thar proves that Amazon should allow reviews with a zero star rating.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars MORE THAN A BIT FAR-FETCHED, 2 Feb. 2013
First impressions were good, and the action was exciting, but it soon degenerated into a poor man's lookalike for Dan Brown, without its credibility. How did Finn get his knife though the security scanners on Eurostar, for instance? Or Caedmon pick up the Internet on top of a mountain in the Pyrenees? The Dark Angel kills a gigolo in her own flat - how does she get away with that, and what does she do about the body and blood? And there's no mention of how an injured Caedmon manages to get from the wilds of the Pyrenees to a mainline train station - an undertaking which would take many an author several pages to describe. Too many magic wands!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars convoluted story, 27 April 2013
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An unlikely mix of medieval folk-lore, Nazi propaganda, and a "gung-ho" marine. Not the most convincing yarn, but did keep me reading to the end, which was a little tame. I will not be reading any more of the "Templar" series by Palov.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pity About The Dialogue!, 11 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: The Templar's Quest (Paperback)
The Templars' Quest is a novel written with a broad sweep of academic and arcane knowledge added to a vibrant imagination. This a great story on many counts. How could it fail? Fascinatingly complex, it offers a powerful secret society, a long-lost artefact, a tough marine, and a vulnerable and grieving young mother pulled into a maelstrom against implacable foes.

So why only 4*s instead of 5*s? To tell the truth, I almost tossed it after the first few chapters. (I persevered, however, and I am glad that I did.) The initial pages focus largely on a tough, aggressive marine whose dialogue quite frankly reveals the author's ignorance of soldier-talk. He is much more comfortable with his prose which is admirably sprinkled with references from Shakespeare, quotations from old English ballads, Irish poetry, history, classical music, Egyptology, Germanic culture and language, and highly complex science. The writer is extremely erudite and this, coupled with his inventive imagination, render the book extremely satisfying on an intellectual level.
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And herein lies the problem. It is Palov's very education that makes him incapable or reproducing, in any convincing way, the normal speech patters of the ordinary soldier. Too often what is clearly meant to be hard and macho comes across as nerdy and cringingly off-putting. I did warm to the marine eventually but not without having to curb the more than occasional flinch at his serious lack of 'cool' together with the occasional less-than-felicitous choice of verb. (Would a hard-bitten macho soldier "snigger" in the heat of an angry argument?)

Of course, it could well be that I am being pedantic here. Do not let my 'pickiness' put you off. This is a great story. The descriptions of Paris are wonderful and the highly ingenious plot hatched by 'The Seven' to revisit WWII is as good as anything Dan Brown might have come up with. Very enjoyable and highly recommended.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five star adventure, 7 Nov. 2011
This review is from: The Templar's Quest (Paperback)
At last a modern adventure with a Templar background. C.M.Palov does not make the mistake that many other authors of this genre are guilty of, that of repeating ad nauseum the history of the Templars. An exciting and memorable story with new heroes who I hope will reppear in future novels.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Very much a fictional tale, 7 May 2013
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I have just finished this book and overall I enjoyed it as a fictional tale that kept me occupied for a few days.
I do agree with some of the other reviewers that the chararcters are very one dimensional and there are a lot of unexplained events and also that the title doesn't really relate to the storyline.
But all that said it was an okay storyline and plot, it did go way over the top at times, but i enjoyed it overall and you just have to remember this is a fictional book not a factual one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Kill Finn!, 20 Sept. 2013
This review is from: The Templar's Quest (Paperback)
After 80 pages of this drivel I started to hope the Nazis would win. Finn was easily the most moronic hero I've ever encountered in the genre.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but...., 5 Dec. 2011
By 
S. Kelly "Sean" (Stockton on Tees, Cleveland United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Another very good and absorbing encounter with Cademon from this author, however whilst again I thoroughly enjoyed the tale I found it hard to fit into a timeline with the two previous Cademon adventures (Stones of Fire & Templars Code). It was as if this was a precusor to those books, yet surely such events would have been referred to. Overall a good story but possibly out of sequence with the other books.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not a great read, 13 May 2013
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The plot has potential but flawed, and the characters are poorly described ...sometimes downright silly and unlikely. There is a lot of repetitious padding, and the writing is amateurish, but at the same time although i skipped a lot I did manage to get to the end.
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The Templar's Quest
The Templar's Quest by C.M. Palov (Paperback - 27 Oct. 2011)
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