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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exhilerating look into the future!
This was a really interesting read. I have previously read Kaku's 'Parallel Worlds' and thoroughly enjoyed it and therefore thought I might give this book a go. I was not disappointed, I found it very intriguing and difficult to put down until I had finished and continue to flick through it now to re-read my favourite sections. Kaku explains the path of technology and...
Published on 12 May 2011 by None3

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bold thinking poorly presented
`Physics of the Future' offers a grand tour of the future of science: through computing, artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, medicine, energy, space flight, the economy and politics. Technology is one of the strongest drivers of change in human society and economy, so it's great to have a sneak preview of what's around the corner.

Weighing in at 360 pages...
Published on 12 July 2011 by Matthew Pearce


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thrillingly positive peek into the future, 10 July 2013
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This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
In recent years I've noticed that in order to depress yourself, find out what politicians and bureaucrats are working on. If you want hope and cheer yourself up, find out what scientists are working on. This book is the best cure for cynicism and apathy that I've seen. Michio Kaku writes in exhilarating manner about a brighter future where the word tumor has vanished from vocabulary and where transportation is faster, safer with negligible burden to environment.

I truly recommend this book to anyone who is excited to find out what the future holds. For those who look to the future in despair, I recommend this book even more. It's easy to read and don't require native-speaker level English to understand.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Far from his best!, 19 Aug. 2012
By 
E. Neumann (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
If you have never read Kaku before you'll probably find this book quite interesting (at least parts of it), however, personally I have two major criticisms:
1) Regarding the physical science aspect, there is little he has not published before and which is presented far better in e.g. "Physics of the Impossible".
2) Where the book really loses the plot is when predictions of advancements in physics are set in a context of economic and social theories that are over-simplistic as well as naively optimistic.
Overall, I was left with the feeling that this was conceived because it was time to publishing another book, rather than waiting a bit longer for something genuinely different to say.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing tour into our future, 20 May 2012
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This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
What will your day be like in the year 2100 compared to the day ahead of you when you woke up this morning? In his new book Physics Of The Future, Michio Kaku takes the reader on a tour through the advances in science and technology, painting a vivid picture of our future - from computers to medicine, from space travel to wealth.
Both engrossing and very accessibly written, this book does not offer wild speculation, but well-reasoned estimates based on the author's extensive research in various scientific fields, all lovingly seasoned with excursions into the world of science fiction. I admit, it was the relationship to my favorite fiction genre which made the journey into our future even more absorbing. Quite often fiction authors made spot on predictions, other times science overtakes science fiction's ideas with ease. And how could I not love the many Star Trek references? In a way, scientific progress is to go where no (wo)man has gone before and this will be where we're headed in the next century as well.
The last chapter, dedicated to what a day in the year 2100 could be like, was both amusing and fascinating, and presents a wonderful conclusion that left me full of awe, a bit of disbelieve, and a lot of hope. A reaction that's probably not so different had someone in the early 20th century shown us a picture of our lives today.
In short: A truly amazing tour into our future!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Penguin. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Peer into the Futurezone and plan the future of your business, 12 April 2012
This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
At the launch party for Pro-retail 2012 held in London this January most of the retailers there told me they were inspired by Palmer and Harvey's taster event for the Futurezone. The Futurezone is a multi site feature of this year's Pro-Retail trade exhibition to be held at Telford on 24 and 25 April.
So when I saw the pre-publicity for Michio Kaku's new book, Physics of the Future, and its promise to show what the world would be like in the year 2100, I was inspired to have a read and to report back to local retailers on what the future holds.
The book delivers on this promise but on so much more as well. If you are a business person who likes new ideas and to think about what may work this is a book for you.
This paragraph from his introduction hooked me. If you like it you will love the book.
"Later, when I was in high school, I decided to follow in the footsteps of these great scientists and put some of my learning to the test. I wanted to be part of this great revolution that I knew would change the world. I decided to build an atom smasher. I asked my mother for permission to build a 2.3 million electron volt particle accelerator in the garage. She was a bit startled but gave me the okay. Then, I went to Westinghouse and Varian Associates, got 400 pounds of transformer steel, 22 miles of copper wire, and assembled a betatron accelerator in my mom's garage."
When he turned on the machine, he frequently blew out all of the fuses in the house. Similarly, Mr Kaku will blow your mind with his explanation of the science that underpins the world today and how the future will look.
He lists 12 Nobel laureates and more than 200 other leading scientists in the start of his book as sources for the ideas that he explores. In one version of the future, on page 198 in my book, he talks about smart materials that can be programed to reshape. So for Christmas instead of buying a new toy all you do is download new software which reshapes last year's hottest toy into this year's hottest toy.
More importantly, he says that computer chips are going to be so small and so cheap that they will be everywhere, replacing bar codes and putting shoppers in control about finding what they want. From about 2070 he says: "Going through a grocery store...you will scan the various products on display and, via the internet in your contact lens, immediately evaluate if the product is a bargain or not. The advantage shifts to the consumers, because they will instantly know everything about a product - its history, its performance record, its price relative to others, and its strengths and liabilities."
However, he also says, computers will not take over the universe because they are no good at two things - pattern recognition and common sense. If any job needs these two skills, it will not be made redundant by technology. For local retailers this is hugely encouraging as they are two skills that you bring to bear on the assortment that you present to shoppers.
The best thing about Mr Kaku's book is that it is filled with optimism. It tells you about the huge challenge we face to replace fossil fuel energy but he is an optimist. So too are shopkeepers. If I don't see you in Telford, enjoy the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great insight into the future., 24 Mar. 2014
By 
David A. Nash "Nash aka Taker" (Chesterfield) - See all my reviews
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Not only does Michio tell you how the future is going to pan out, but he also tells you why other things will fail. He also tells you why his predictions are acurate. And why having this foresight is possible. Early in the book he mentions Lionardo de Vinci and his flying machine and calculator which where just drawings which actually worked when built to his instructions in the 20th century. An amazing read with the science explained so well even I could understand!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book from a great man, 4 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
I love Michio Kaku. His view of the future is so positive. He is has the rare gift of being a true scientist that can convey his passion and insight in such an interesting and captivating way that would appeal to anyone. Some scientists and futurologists can be so boring.
I just wish he was my teach when i was a child.
A great book with grist future predications that makes me very excited about our future
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Can't Wait For The Future!, 29 July 2013
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Michio Kaku gives a fascinating insight to the advances currently being made in science and technology, and ponders where that may lead us in the near and far future. This is not merely speculation, but a realistic estimate made by one of the worlds most respected physicist, and countless other figures that lead their respective scientific fields. Well worth a read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We must cherish our wisdom and education, 15 April 2012
By 
Jj Kerr "theunusualself" (Knowhere) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
Excellent, yes (see all the other reviews). But that final chapter was a bit corny and unnecessary.

Otherwise, I loved it. I came to it for the physics (particle physics, string theory) but ended up being more captured the themes of wisdom, education, 'brainpower industries' and intellectual capitalism in the second half of the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 8 Jan. 2014
By 
Ethan Ramsay (Lincolnshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Physics of the Future: The Inventions That Will Transform Our Lives (Paperback)
Intriguing narrative on Michio Kaku's opinions for the directions that technology will advance in future. Based on current R&D, there is some merit to what he says and he has a good reputation.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars BLAND SEER, 16 May 2011
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Michio Kaku's "Physics of the Future" is disappointing. While it contains a fair quantity of interesting material, it offers nothing that is astonishing. Its vision of the future is flat and forgettable, its prose dull and convoluted.

Professor Kaku posits a future of ubiquitous chips (he sees Moore's Law as not reaching its physical limits until 2020) continuous connection to son-of-the-internet through contact lenses, enhanced reality and virtual tourism, extended lifespans and human capability due to genetic engineering, nano surgery and cybernetics, domestic robots, magnetic transportation and, more speculatively, cold fusion, space elevators, quantum computing, matter replicators and advanced artificial intelligence. Most of this is plausible and much of it is interesting, but it is hardly new to casual readers of the science and technology sections of, say, the Economist or the New York Times. Not to mention fans of Star Trek.

As both a respected quantum physicist and a telegenic popular scientist, Professor Kaku is well-positioned to present his predictions of the future. For this book he also consulted some 300 other experts. Perhaps that is his problem: too many inputs, for he is like the centipede who forgot how to walk after thinking too hard about which leg to move first. In his earlier book, "The Physics of the Impossible," Kaku used a simple framework of three levels of impossibility to organize his work into a lucid whole. In this work he introduces several different frameworks that he either drops or applies only half-heartedly. In whole sections, as in his "energy" chapter or his discussion of Artificial Intelligence, he argues himself in circles without a convincing conclusion. He includes sections such as those on climate change and the social implications of future technologies more for the sake of exhaustiveness than because he has anything insightful to say. Much of his prose is wooden and padded with clichés and uninspired references to Greek or Norse mythology.

Perhaps in the future, intelligent machines will step up to effective editing. In the meantime, Professor, would you let your students get away with this?
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