Customer Reviews


119 Reviews
5 star:
 (51)
4 star:
 (22)
3 star:
 (22)
2 star:
 (13)
1 star:
 (11)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good ending to a good trilogy
Like the first two, this book is fast paced and kept me turning the page. I like the writing style and I like the story. The ending felt a little bit rushed, but plausible enough in the book's universe... in any universe really; life's unpredictable and people do strange things. At least it didn't just finish abruptly with a massive meteorite that wipes everyone out...
Published 15 months ago by Greg

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing: Show don't tell!
I loved the first book in this trilogy; whilst it had a lot of familiar tropes, it was well written, entertaining and hooked em with well realised characters and a fleshed out world.

By the end of this third book I was ready to visit some of Thomas Cale's wrath upon the author.

I can just about put up with the constant, "These Redeemers are the...
Published 9 months ago by A. Hewitt


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing: Show don't tell!, 18 Mar 2014
By 
A. Hewitt (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I loved the first book in this trilogy; whilst it had a lot of familiar tropes, it was well written, entertaining and hooked em with well realised characters and a fleshed out world.

By the end of this third book I was ready to visit some of Thomas Cale's wrath upon the author.

I can just about put up with the constant, "These Redeemers are the greatest soliders ever... but the Materazzi are unparalleled in combat... but the Laconics are the finest warriors of all time... no wait, the Redeemers are incredible... etc" way of melodramatically trying to inflate every battle. Ditto the tendency for every battle to leave one side of the verge of ruin, only for them to pull through despite terrible losses... and then that gives them a decisive advantage over everyone else in the world put together. Hmmm.

I can live with the author not just taking things for inspiration from history (which the series does very well) but then just copying them almost word for word. One speech is given as an introduction to a chapter (with correct attribution), and then used by a character just a few pages later. What on earth is that supposed to achieve? We know the concept you're trying to get across; trust your readers more!

I can even nearly get over the clumsy chaos theory analogy, which stems from (literally) the beating of a butterfly's wings. And the results seem terribly important at the time, but actually aren't at all. This happens a lot.

I can almost forgive the ridiculously self-contradictory nature of the writing throughout, such as (not verbatim) "And that was the final straw that meant he would never recover" ... and then a few pages later he's recovered. "And then Cale was killed" ... and then on the next page, "Not really!". This happens so often throughout the course of the book that when a major character finally does die, in a vital part of the book, it is completely robbed of all emotion because you're half expecting it to be reversed in the blink of an eye.

The final straw for me, however, is the heavy reliance on exposition, especially towards the end, which seems ridiculously rushed. So many interesting parts are skipped, and some don't even seem to make a great deal of sense. After a few (interesting) descriptions of skirmishes in the start of the 'final' war, he just casually mentions that they then went on to win, sack the capital city, and all was well (the New Model Army Cale creates is supposedly great for defensive ability, but doesnt seem so suited to a siege, such as would be expected at Chartres... was it all really so easy?). That's the most glaring example, but there are loads in the book. So much foreshadowing and building happens of things that end up of little importance, while matters that are crucial to the story are skipped over (what happened to Gil is just one question of many.

I won't even go near the ridiculous 'historical' bookends.

It's a shame, as there are some fabulous characters in there, some great writing and some interesting plotting, but in the end I felt it just fell down under its own weight.

The funny thing is that it was entertaining enough in places that I would actually buy and read another if the series was continued, and would rank the previous books as 4*, but this one just went wrong in a lot of places, for me at least.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 5 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Slightly better than the 2nd book in the Trilogy but in all, disappointing after the amazing Left Hand of God
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good ending to a good trilogy, 6 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Like the first two, this book is fast paced and kept me turning the page. I like the writing style and I like the story. The ending felt a little bit rushed, but plausible enough in the book's universe... in any universe really; life's unpredictable and people do strange things. At least it didn't just finish abruptly with a massive meteorite that wipes everyone out!

If you liked the first two, I'm sure you'll enjoy this!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a let down, 4 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Ending is really anticlimatic , I read the first book in the trilogy and was very excited when the second came out and came away feeling a little dissapointed. The final piece did nothing to dispel this feeling.

The main issue is that the bulk of the plot relates to the war between the reedemers and cales forces and yet the descriptions of the battles are virtually non existant , towards the back end of the book the author literally lists about 10 or 12 battles which lead up to the final showdown on one page but doesnt give a scrap of detail about any of them !

I was hoping the ending would redeem the book but without spoiling it anticlimatic doesnt do it justice the ending is just terrible.

My personal opinion is that the author started with a really good premise and just lost his way a little bit i think that this series could have been excellent if it had been over say 5 books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable Trilogy ends in Disappointment., 10 Aug 2014
By 
Bruce "from Brighton" (UK - England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Beating of his Wings (Left Hand of God Trilogy 3) (Paperback)
As many others here have said, this was a really engaging series and I enjoyed the first two books immensely. As the author himself mentions in this book - the series gets placed in the "Fantasy" genre - but nothing magical or inexplicable happens - it's all within the realms of possibility.

The suggestion is that this is our own world after some kind of disaster which has wiped all of our technology and inventions off the face of the earth - with only half-remembered and garbled versions of our religions and ideas remaining.

Everything that happens to Thomas Cale is entirely plausible - in fact, we start to realise these are all "versions" of things that have happened before in our own history. The question is whether he is Hitler or Henry the Fifth, or many other characters from our past - as they say, the winners get to write history in their own image.

All of this is going very well - there is humour and a kind of wry despair at human nature - but then the books starts to get bogged down halfway through in battles and it's almost like the author gives up and doesn't know how to tie up all the loose ends before running out of space. Maybe it was always destined to be a disappointing end - after all, we know that Cale is not a "destroying angel" and himself is an avowed atheist.

But somehow we go through expecting something fantastical to happen - to see "the end of days" or the judgement of God. But what we get is Cale, just a weak boy who gets weaker throughout and eventually fades away into obscurity. He is undoubtedly clever and very good at survival and strategy - but everybody expects more from him and even as readers, we want him to do something magical or extraordinary.

Of course there are many twists and unexpected events in the ending which I have not given away - but ultimately it feels unsatisfactory and even though the author has been true to his vision, we want something more - we want that magical event - even though we know that in real life things like that don't happen, do they?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Total let down after the first 2 books, 13 May 2014
By 
This review is from: The Beating of his Wings (Left Hand of God Trilogy 3) (Paperback)
What a terrible disappointment. The first book in the trilogy was gripping, exciting, raising lots of questions, a real page turner. It created an interesting world and really made you want to see how things turned out. The second book was not quite as good but still took the story further and still left you wondering about how it would all turn out.

This book feels like the author is just taking the mickey out of his readers.

This is meant to be some kind of post apocalyptic fantasy drama based around a nightmare vision of a religious order - like the medieval catholic church inquisition style but worse. This book starts with the main character er.....having psychotherapy because for some reason he's gone mad. There is even some stupid psychotherapy report where the therapist says they don't believe main character's story.

Right at the beginning though the author attempts something I first saw in a wonderful episode of the sci fi series Babylon 5 called "the deconstruction of falling stars." In this episode the main characters are all analysed from millions of years in the future when they are just matters of distant historical record. This book attempts this. Suddenly we're arguing about an archaeologist who found the manuscript of the trilogy and whether it was all real or not. It just makes you wonder what the heck this author was trying to achieve. It's baffling and annoying.

And then the plot just peters out and the main character wanders off inconclusively.

This is the most lazy, arrogant, disappointing end to a trilogy in any genre I have ever read. So bad, I wish I hadn't started the trilogy in the first place and so terrible I will never buy a Paul Hoffman book again. Hoffman totally "phoned this in" and just plays with his readers--- it really does feel like he just couldn't be bothered. Neither will I with his work again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining enough but not well written book, 26 Dec 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The first book of this serie was great. The second book was not so good as the first one. This third volume was probably the weakest of all three.

I expected a. Better description of the battles, or the main events. Instead I was left wanting over and over again. Too bad, since the plot is interesting enough
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor end to a good trilogy, 4 Oct 2013
By 
P. Spicer (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I really enjoyed the first two books in the series and had been looking forward to the final installment. However I feel really let down by a rambling story that lacked cohesion and direction. In a touch of irony the main character is very much like the quality of the book as in first two he is strong and daring (albeit pretty evil), whereas this time he is weak and feeble, which sadly made for a boring result.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Upsetting, 27 Sep 2013
Having read both previous books, and having experienced the same downward trend as other readers it was with trepidation that I bought this book. The plot development from the second book continues to fall away until by the end of the book it is non-existent. The character continues to fall in ability and interest. Other characters in the book are ignored or woefully under developed.
The story arc continues to fall apart until you get to the end of the book when the main character just walks away... and if anyone can explain what all the nonsense at the start of the book and at the end of it means? The author seems to have got carried away with his dreams of grandeur and had to rush onto a new book so didn't bother to finish this one.
Very disappointing because it had good characters and interesting arcs early on in the trilogyl.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Really poor - so dissapointed., 11 Sep 2013
I truely enjoyed the first two books and I had been so looking forward to the third, but having read it...pure dissapointment.
Some of the best characters from the previous two books virtually ignored, two new characters brought in, built up and then abandoned and a final couple of chapters that appear like they were written in a hurry by someone with only a passing understanding of the story and characters in general.
The trilogy is still worth reading as the first two books are fantastic, but when opening the third - don't get your hopes up!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Beating of his Wings (Left Hand of God Trilogy 3)
The Beating of his Wings (Left Hand of God Trilogy 3) by Paul Hoffman (Paperback - 16 Jan 2014)
£3.85
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews