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117 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW!
Right, where do i begin??? how did i ever live without reading this book?? i was told by some idiot that it was boring which put me off for a while, but i read it recently and was totally blown away!! It is honestly the most intense, passionate, maddening book i've ever read. It starts out strong and keeps on going, i actually had to force myself not to read it all in one...
Published on 29 Nov 2001 by kerry_k46@hotmail.com

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Norton's 'Wuthering Heights'
As you would expect from any Norton critical edition of a text, this is far more detailed than other editions. The notes at the bottom of the pages are decent - the handy translations of Joseph's dialect are helpful. (It must be said, however, these notes are not as extensive as the Penguin Classics edition.) It contains a selection of Emily Brontė's poetry, a detailed...
Published on 7 Jun 2009 by Mr. B. Hammond


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Norton's 'Wuthering Heights', 7 Jun 2009
By 
Mr. B. Hammond (Hamilton, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
As you would expect from any Norton critical edition of a text, this is far more detailed than other editions. The notes at the bottom of the pages are decent - the handy translations of Joseph's dialect are helpful. (It must be said, however, these notes are not as extensive as the Penguin Classics edition.) It contains a selection of Emily Brontė's poetry, a detailed account of the editorial process after the novel's initial publication, and a wide selection of reviews from when the text first appeared.

For a Norton Critical Edition I did feel it was slightly light with regard to more recent criticism. It contains just five recent critical essays - one of which is on the problems associated with depicting Heathcliff in film versions of the text. Where, for example, is Dorothy Van Ghent's important 'On Wuthering Heights'?

This is probably the best edition any reader of this text could buy. It is not, however, as exhaustive as one might like.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Wuthering Heights - Emily Bronte, 19 April 2014
By 
RachelWalker "RachelW" (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Well. Boy, was I surprised by my reaction to this. If Jane Eyre and The Tentant of Wildfell Hall are anything to judge by (and, to be fair, they may not be given that they're by different writers!) I was expecting to love this. I didn't. Not at all.

I found this book a complete mess. The passion is admirable and, along with the setting, is certainly the greatest thing about the book. But the narrative is a mess and the characters unbelievable. Catherine behaves like a spoilt child, and Heathcliffe is a monster - I couldn't stand them. Their respective children and families are not too much better. The narrative conceit of having Mr Lockwood relate what Nelly Dean has conveyed to him (who sometimes is conveying in the "I" voice what others have conveyed to her; in one chapter i counted three narrators each being "I"), is just confusing. After the first half of the book the whole thing just seems rudderless. The emotional pitch vaccilates. And who exactly is the protagonist? The focus chops and changes without reason from one character and event to the next. In some instances this would be intentional and fine if well-handled, but here it is not intentional and not well handled - this is just an immaturely structured and narrated book by an immature writer. I'm sad she didn't live longer, because what she might have came to write might well live up to the reputation that this book inexplicably has.
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117 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW!, 29 Nov 2001
Right, where do i begin??? how did i ever live without reading this book?? i was told by some idiot that it was boring which put me off for a while, but i read it recently and was totally blown away!! It is honestly the most intense, passionate, maddening book i've ever read. It starts out strong and keeps on going, i actually had to force myself not to read it all in one night and to save some for the next day! Emily Bronte uses such powerful imagery in her prose that it just stuns you. The setting of the story in the Yorkshire moors was absolutely fitting, i doubt that if it had been set anywhere else it couldn't have possibly been half as powerful. The moors add to the air of mystery, gloom, beauty, passion,love, and tragedy. Heathcliff and Cathy are definately the most interesting and intense pair of lovers i have ever read of. Heathcliff especially provokes me, mostly because i cannot decide whether i love or hate him, and that is but one part of the genius of this book. Heathcliff is the hero/anti-hero of the book and just so utterly fascinating a character. The best ingredient of this masterpiece is the fact that the story takes place in such a secluded region, with equally interesting characters, away from the social niceties and civilities that are common in other books of this time. Therefore, the passion and tragedy of the love and hatred in this story is more strongly felt. I could honestly go on forever but i'll spare all you readers out there. All i will say is that you definately must read this book, i know that this is horribly cliche but it truly is one of the best books i have ever read in my life! You will not be sorry.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book ever written, 3 Jan 2001
By A Customer
I read this novel when I was 17 and it was the sole reason for me choosing to study English Literature at Degree Level. Nine years on and having read a library full of books this is still miles ahead of some of the best works of literature ever written as far as I am concerned. It amazes me that people do not like it - how can you not be moved by the passion Cathy and Heathcliff feel for one another? Their story is like no other in literature. Really they had no place in 19th Century Literature and Emily knew this when she wrote her novel. Take them out of Wuthering Heights and you have a genteel story of a girl teaching a boy to read and write so that he is worthy of marrying her. This in itself would have made a good novel but only Emily Bronte was brave enough to make the wild, wicked Cathy and demonic Heathcliff her central characters. Even Charlotte Bronte seemed terrified at the power of the book and thought it her role to defend her sisters writings. To anyone who has never read it - do so!! You will love it!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Without wanting to sound cliched.., 2 Aug 2004
This is one of my favourite novels. I read it for the first time when I was twelve, which doesn't sound like long ago (I'm only seventeen now), but what is important is that it was the first time I sampled a novel of this quality. The first time I had read a novel of love and loss that was dramatic, and realistic and twisted and evil and passionate. Yes, there were a lot of 'and's in that sentence, but that in itself is an expression of how much I love this book.
It's a bit like pulp romance EXCEPT that it has so much more depth and meaning and beauty. And it isn't a big pile of cow poo. I apologise profusely for that. I'm meant to be being all mature and reviewing a few books on Amazon and I accidentally keep comparing them to animal faeces. I think it just shows that I am a passionate reader. So anyway, buy Wuthering Heights, spend the change on a packet of Munchies. It's only £1.50, and it could change your life. You may become an impassioned lover.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Piece of English Literature, 12 April 2001
By A Customer
Everything about this book makes it makes it truly brilliant. The wild setting of the Yorkshire Moors, the grey and dark ambience of the Heights, the contrast of this at the Grange. Wuthering Heights is full of; love; romance; passion; revenge; and violence; covering ideas about: nature; religion; superstition; death; and the social values of the 19th Century. Criticised when it first came out because the book was written so far ahead of its time, it explores feminist ideas about the inheritance of land and money, and about marriage for social status. Possibly offensive to the original Victorian audience who would have read it, it would appeal to a modern readership subsequently, something of which, due to her premature death, Brontė would never learn of.
Brontė writes about her own experience in this book, with some characters closely relating to her own life. Her sole piece of literature shows her unique outlook on existence, and denying the reader perhaps the resolved ending they would have desired; instead we get the realistic conclusion that everyone can relate to.
Every character in this novel can portray a whole group of people. Heathcliff can represent the 'working class hero come good'. Brontė skilfully manipulates the reader into sympathising with Heathcliff, despite his appalling and violent behaviour later on. Catherine is reckless, passionate and rebellious, but maintains a clear head; she is aware of the importance of keeping a high status in the world. Brontė presents this with her marriage to Edgar Linton, denying her genuine, but concealed, feelings for Heathcliff. Even with Edgar's laissez-faire attitude to Catherine's close friendship to Heathcliff, can create the strong contrast between the two men. The reader can discover the shocking lengths that Heathcliff goes to for revenge against his former anguish, in an almost psychotic way that spans beyond death. His treatment by Catherine's brother Hindley, and his betrayal by Catherine for marrying Edgar causes him to enact a series of events including marriage without love and mistreatment of others in the most terrible way. Interestingly, Brontė allows everything to be observed by the character Nelly in an almost voyeuristic way, despite the fact she is a narrator to the story; it shows the idea of narrators being fair and trusting can occasionally be false. Every character is different, and often unconventional, represented in a certain way for a certain reason. The book successfully takes us over two generations of characters, each with different ideas, personalities and attitudes.
This book can be quite confusing at times by the use of similar names such Catherine's daughter also being named Catherine and Isabella Linton calling her son Linton. Also having to travel through two sets of narration in a non-chronological order. However, Brontė deals with all these factors marvellously and the powerful setting, intriguing characters and wide range of ideas challenged makes this book a political masterpiece of English Literature.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars wuthering heights, 9 Nov 2003
this is one of those books that has entered the public conciseness, everyone thinks they know the story, it's a lovely victorian girly love story, right? Wrong it is a love story but it is a story of a powerfull destructive kind of love. Heathcliff & Cathy are the most selfish pair of B's in literature, when the book was published it was under a male pen name and when it came out that it was written by a woman people didn't belive it. The way it's written is really inventive also, it is narrated all in the third person by Nelly Dean, a house keeper to the present tenant(read the book), the chronology is also complex the tale is not told sequencially but jumps back and forth, in the same manner as Resevoure Dogs. This is one of my favourite books and I have read it again and again, do yourself a favour.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not my cup of tea., 11 Oct 2009
Before I proceed to the actual review, I have to underline three significant parameters that have influenced it: one, I am a great fan of realism; two, I am not such a great fan of old English literature, perhaps as a consequence to fact number one; and three, I pay more attention to technique than to language. So, if you disagree with any of the above, this may not be the review for you.

Now, to the point. I could not give the book anything less than three stars, because a) I have read far worse novels and b)I do have a certain respect for anything that is being considered 'a classic' (and classic does not necessarily mean earth-shaking).

As many people have mentioned, Emily Bronte is good with language. If for anything else, you will enjoy her descriptions; they are so vivid, I could actually walk through the moors, in and out the rooms I could go.

But this is as fas as it went for me. I truly felt some of the time dedicated to landscapes should have been instead given to characterisation, especially since this is clearly a character-driven narrative. We know that the story is about Catherine and Heathcliff's tumultuous relationship, yet I never saw the reasons for why it was so. I would have truly appreciated a few scenes of character exposition, long before Catherine ends up wounded in the Linton house. It felt as if the sentiments were there because the author said so, than as a natural development of plot and character interrelations. There are scenes of immense emotional explosions between them two, yet I just can't see the tension being built up, merely indicated. None of my emotions went underneath the surface, I'm afraid.

I also found it very difficult to identify with either of them. It was difficult for me to understand Catherine's exasperation against Heathcliff, since her passion for him is not visible until his return- she does choose to marry someone closer to her social circumstances, without any inner struggles (her confession to Nelly seems more as if she is looking for reassurance in order to overcome her guilt). Heathcliff, on the other hand, initially the wronged hero, is developed to become the dark antagonist seeking his own catharsis, yet he is so persistently inhuman and evil, that not only you can't understand him, but you can't understand Catherine's passion for him either. There was an incident, a word, a gesture missing from the picture; something that have bonded untamed (and selfish) Catherine to dark Heathcliff.

I understand, and frankly appreciate Bronte for her intention to commend on the ethos of the time; however, her characters remained mere strangers to me until the end of the book. I failed to accept their thoughts or experience their feelings, and so the story became something I witnessed from a distance.

I can't say read it or not. It is not the ultimate torture (although this also depends on age, tastes and gender), but it's not the sort of 'Les Miserables' classic either.

I'm glad Bronte wrote it though. After all, it did inspire Kate Bush to offer us a fantastic ballad.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wuthering Heights, 11 April 2013
So having studied Nineteenth Century Literature at University, the world of classics has been recently opened to me. Wuthering Heights is a title I did not study, but chosen because it is considered a classic.

My initial reaction was of pleasant surprise. Although I had no preconceptions of the book, I was not expecting what I was offered in the first few chapters. A striking feature is how easy a read it is. The prose is particularly flowing even when describing the moors- which I had very little interest in, and I sometimes wished the narrator Mrs Dean/ Mr Lockwood would move on from the scenery of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange.

I do not doubt a scenery such as the moors works brilliantly, any less dramatic a choice and the novel may not have reached the longevity that it has acquired. However I doubt that, in my reading the setting of the two homes in the moors was well wrapped in the novel; but more could have been done to maximise the potential those moors held. As it is the moors remained a stagnant thing if beauty, depicted, described, drawn out for effect- but never quite utilised.

Unfortunately I fell quickly into the category of readers who had a strong dislike for poor Cathy. As a leading lady Cathy's entire allure is held in her ability to attract all varieties and variations of tragedy, abuse and ill temper. Beyond this, I found her every word irritating, her actions showing more of her character than her conversation. Her flights of self-supposed fancy were too flighty for my liking.

In contradiction both Heathcliffe and Hareton were filled with all the character depths, misconceptions and opportunities to redeem themselves to the reader- all things I found distinctly lacking in any of the novel's Catherines. Mrs Dean I found to be a pleasant choice in narrator, and it was pleasant to see Ms Bronte return to both her narrators periodically as befitting.

The ending of the novel remains something of mystery to me. It was conclusive, yet left me feeling empty. I suppose it was meant to be happy- Catherine Linton finally able to be happy and regain what was taken from her. But it was a cold, soulless ending. Almost as if Emily Bronte disliked her own characters.

In summary, Wuthering Heights will always be a classic, and is well written beyond doubt- to an extent. However it is no Pride and Prejudice or Mansfield Park- then again it was never going to be.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece of nature, 13 Oct 2012
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I believe that you don't just read Wuthering Heights, you live it. What can I honestly say about Wuthering Heights that could show my affection I have with the story? Since reading it for my English Literature A Level, I have lived the story countless times; thought about it everyday. It's a novel that leaves you either confused, saddened or emotionally connected with not only the characters, but the Yorkshire moors and the house that is Wuthering Heights. It won't leave you - it changes you. The story, so secluded in itself is nothing like the other books I have read, for it gives you what you want in a novel: characters, setting, plot, themes, all wonderfully developed, leaving them all in your imagination to flourish as you keep reading.

The writing is simply beautiful, expressing the setting, character and plot perfectly in such a dire situation. Yes, this is one of the most extreme, horrid and liminal stories I've read, but the way in which the characters unfold, the Gothic overtakes and the ultimate downfalls of Catherine and Heathcliff is what subsidizes the experience of reading this phenomenal novel. No wonder Brontė is the "Sphynx of Literature": as she writes from the heart, mind and soul. The extremeness of Catherine's "Nelly, I am Heathcliff" and "My love for Edgar resembles the foliage in the woods: time will change it" also sticks with you and you question whether this love between Catherine and Heathcliff will be as strong as your love for someone else.

It does not just deal with the love and eventual downfalls of Catherine and Heathcliff, it also introduces side plots, such as Hindley's drinking, Hareton's illiteracy and the overall themes of power, wealth and choice to co-inside superiorly. These are done throughout the book to lift it from a "love story" to a "domesticated tragedy", providing the minor characters with fulfilling roles that you can argue take centre stage at points in the novel. Perhaps these were themes Brontė knew well enough to pour such detail and corruption into such a typical novel that baffled critics when first published.

I can't write how much I love this novel, for it is in itself a masterpiece of nature: a violent piece of beauty. It will be the novel I read over and over again, to myself, my children and my grandchildren. There is nothing I could say to express how I feel about this novel; I adore Emily Brontė for being such a daring human to explore the liminal, the Gothic and for the way it has truly impacted on my life. It will become my bible throughout life, and I will have pleasure in reading it time and time again, because it's a timeless classic.
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Wuthering Heights (Clothbound Classics)
Wuthering Heights (Clothbound Classics) by Emily Brontė (Hardcover - 6 Nov 2008)
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