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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less
The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less As I read this I realised that the information was all common sense and was stored in my head but had to see it in black and white to bring it to the forefront of my memory BUT there are also other snippets of information that are well worth knowing, useful website addresses etc. Did find that it started off well and was funny as...
Published on 10 Feb. 2009 by Alison Busby

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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars TheThrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less
If you were a younger person than I, then perhaps this book would be of more interest. It was enjoyable, but a lot of the tips and hints are ones I already implement. This is probably more useful to those who have had a really nice life-style which has suddenly come to an end. It is still a well-put-together book, however, and a good read.
Published on 22 Feb. 2009 by A. Birtwistle


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112 of 126 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Credit crunch time..., 4 Nov. 2008
By 
What an amazing resource this book is going to be! I never would have thought that India Knight would provide such a down to earth, practical but glamorous guide, but it's all here: everything from thrifty food shopping, recipes, ideas for holidays, clothes, parties and weddings to housey stuff and gifts, and all in such a beautifully illustrated book. I thought I knew all the sensible things to do in the credit crunch era, but there is TONS of stuff here I'd never thought of, like websites for clothes swapping, ideas on how to survive Christmas cheaply, and some brilliant rants (I particularly appreciated the one about not expecting your friends to fork out to come to your extended hen party). But surely the best chapter has to be the one that explains how to manage your money in a way that even an idiot (me) can follow. It's also a bit of a call to arms about how to change your spending habits emotionally and how to come to terms with the idea of delayed gratification.

I was really surprised by this book: it is so comprehensive and full of heart and style.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Be thrifty and don't waste your money on this book, 30 Oct. 2009
By 
Paul Elswood (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less (Paperback)
India Knight must have a very good agent to convince Penguin Books to indulge her by publishing The Thrift Book. Ms Knight's rambling homilies begin to grate after just a few pages. As one progresses through the chapters, one cannot help but feel that this woman actually lives a rather comfortable existence and is simply churning out formulaic money-saving tips and ideas for the masses.

If you really need to save money, start by not spending it on this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice bit of chicken, 10 Jun. 2010
This review is from: The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less (Paperback)
The cynic in me was all prepared to loathe this book. A glut of articles in the national press about how we can save money by not having manicures at the salon (gosh!) and going to free museums instead of flying to Paris for the weekend (really?) threatened to turn me Marxist, and extracts in which Ms Knight describes cheap jeans as from Gap made me wonder whether this would be another work which thought thriftiness was simply what most of us do every day. However, the book isn't aimed at those a penny away from the poorhouse (there;s a gap in the lifestyle market there - 402 Things You Can Cook With A Primark Thong) - it is for people who simply have never had the need nor the inclination to consider what difference a few lifestyle changes can make. And in that, it succeeds. It is a book for people who think non-Waitrose food is terrible, that paying someone £15 to put a zipper in is better than taking an hour out to pop a film on and do it yourself, and conversely for people that think thrift is synonymous with mean and that ultra-cheap is always best. It walks the line well between economy and false-economy and anything that encourages people to learn how to do things themselves rather than be reliant on others doing it for them for a fee is definitely a good thing - most people would prefer a hand-made present than a will-this-do from the nearest shop, finding good clothes that will last and learning how to help them do so is great whether those come from the King's Road or The Children's Society, and cooking for yourself is fun rather than the offputting thing some see it as. Written from a position of privilege it may well be, but not to be dismissed on those grounds. Plus, the illustrations and design are marvellous, a Cath Kidston reimagining of the Forties Make Do and Mend pamphlets.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Something for everyone., 19 Dec. 2009
By 
It's a well organised book, so you can skip the chapters that you aren't interested in, either because you don't want to sew your own clothes or because you already know what an ISA is; but then you can bookmark the bits that appeal to you, for me the clothing, food and beauty sections were pretty interesting reading.

It's a good read spiced with India's peculiar confessions of how she's reached these money-saving solutions, thorough a youth of thoughtless snobbery and an anxiety-inducing fear of finances.

A money saving bible akin to MoneySavingExpert it is not. It is from the point of view of a working woman with an income to afford a few luxuries, as long as she thinks about where it's going. Penny pinching to the point where you're living in an unheated commune is for you, then this is not the book you're looking for. She is simply offering her own practical methods that slot in with her lifestyle. She tempers her money saving with time constraints, and an ethical approach to what she buys and eats. She will only buy organic meat but her recipes are chosen for versatility, so you don't waste the good quality food you have, which in my opinion (and hers, obviously) is a better way of feeding yourself and your family than buying cheap processed food.

The chapters are well researched, and there are lots of website and book recommendations if you're interested in finding local resources or buying the things she recommends.

When buying this book, bear in mind that there is no catch-all version of this subject matter. There will undoubtedly be something of interest for everyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Example of a churned out book that doesn't really hit the mark, 4 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less (Paperback)
There are simply too many points in this book when you get the impression that the writer is well off financially and simply has a best mate who is also her publisher. The book is carelessly edited and seems to have been rushed through without close enough inspection of whether it does what it says it will do.

Yes the book itself is made from cheaper quality materials. And there are plenty of examples where the reader is encouraged to 'make their own' clothes, household items etc.

But the clues are in the detail. Too many times the suggestion is to spend money on a worn out vintage, then spend more money on expensive trim or accessories which results in a twice paid for mishmash that relies too much on skill and not enough on frugalness. What really irritated me were the indignant claims dotted within the book that one must never scrimp on 'this' or buy inexpensive 'that'. What happens if the reader can't afford to be as indignant??

This book is clearly written by someone who doesn't need to scrimp and so doesn't really understand how to truly scrimp. It also seems to have overly relied upon online resources. Anyone can find websites if they sit at the computer long enough. The reason for buying a thrift book such as this one is trying (but failing) to be, is to learn something about how to save money when money is tight.

The author is writing about something she doesn't really understand and it shows.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 15 Nov. 2008
I was really looking forward to reading this book after reading a sample of it in the Times in the summer. However I found the complete book rather disappointing in that it didn"t really contain any new tips/ideas for thriftier living than what I (and many people I know) do already.I feel that India Knight is just cashing in and profitting on the back of the current trend for more frugal living using old established ways of making the pennies stretch further.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Patronised to death but quite fun too, 6 Jan. 2014
By 
M. Callaghan "mags" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I like the way India Knight writes although a lot of it is a kind of fascination for how posh people live, and this book is no exception - although maybe a bit worse as she is trying to teach something which she hasn't learned. It feels a bit like having your life made over by Trinny and Susannah, a sort of posh bossiness combined with a feeling that if you stop being irritated you might find that she is on your side. It's not really about saving money at all. You'd need to eat a shed load of jam before it was cheaper to make your own and knitting jumpers is really expensive as is making cards and much of the other crafty stuff. To me it feels like she is completely new to any sort of money management and assumes that her readers have the same life (you don't have go go to Tuscany, buy desginer, eat lunch out every day etc etc. and the beauty products she says are budget are ones I splash out on and I have a pretty good income and no kids). I did like some of the web sites. It's clearly not her area of expertise but people would save a lot more looking at the interest they paid on their credit card than knitting a cushion cover. Also it's almost of no use to people who live alone. What I would have liked is some examples of weekly budgets and then different ways of spending this more effectively so that debts could be paid and so on but maybe it just isn't that sort of book.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good starting point, 13 Nov. 2008
This book is a good starting point for those who have found themselves 'credit crunched' recently or in their twenties.However, for those who had to adjust to a more frugal lifestyle many years ago this book is little more than a useful resource of website addresses and new recipes.For real thrift and economy she might have done better to research some wartime literature.Some of the suggestions were patronising such as the notion that a gift of a candle doesn't give 'the impression of being especially thoughtful'.Au contraire,a decent scented candle might be viewed by the recipient as a luxury and be graciously received (in my household it certainly would).A little more depth in the money chapter wouldn't have gone amiss either.An entertaining read at a not very thrifty £14.99.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read with some useful ideas, 31 May 2009
This was an enjoyable read, I read it cover to cover in an afternoon, and I'm now going back through it to pick out the ideas I can use in my everyday life. There are loads of great blogs and websites listed in the book for further reading on each of the subjects she covers.

A lot of the points India makes are things I already do, and so I think it's aimed at people who are more wasteful with money than I am. If you're already thrifty you might find this book to be stating the obvious, or even quite extravagant (suggesting Paris as a day trip, for example!) I actually found the lifestyle the book promotes to be aspirational rather than about 'cutting back'. Aspirational in a good wholesome way though, combining old-fashioned homemaking with contemporary environmental concerns.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars worth a read, 1 Oct. 2010
This review is from: The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less (Paperback)
I really enjoyed reading this book. I think that India Knight has got a good way of writing and sense of humour, which makes it pleasurable reading. There are some good ideas on how to save money, like ordering on line for your groceries with a list. I tried it and saved a lot! There is a lovely section on making home made gifts, and some good links to websites to help you get started. On the downside this book is written with the city dweller in mind, especially Londoners. Also some of the tips seemed a bit strange such as buying a motor home to holiday in the uk to save money. I don't see this as thrifty when even second hand ones cost thousands, and are hardly economical to run! However I still do recommend this book, as it does have some good ideas in it.
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The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less
The Thrift Book: Live Well and Spend Less by India Knight (Paperback - 2 July 2009)
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