Customer Reviews


23 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating insight into a complex man
Gandhi turns out to be much deeper than I expected after reading this book. It covers a vast array of subjects, all dealt with with the most amazing modesty, as Gandhi literally experiments his way through subjects like dietetics, religion, equality and non-violent protest towards his success in the later years that made him world-famous. Buy it now, and learn from...
Published on 7 Feb. 1999

versus
27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't quite do this profound man the justice he deserves
Sadly I was a little disappointed with this. After watching Richard Attenborough's epic with Ben Kingsley, I was so inspired that I had to read more about this inspirational man, so I went straight to the library to get his autobiography.

When will I learn?! I'm not a big fan of autobiographies as, no matter how interesting the person, they tend to be dull...
Published on 24 July 2008 by Femmielala


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating insight into a complex man, 7 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
Gandhi turns out to be much deeper than I expected after reading this book. It covers a vast array of subjects, all dealt with with the most amazing modesty, as Gandhi literally experiments his way through subjects like dietetics, religion, equality and non-violent protest towards his success in the later years that made him world-famous. Buy it now, and learn from it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should Gandhi have been a motivational speaker?, 11 Jun. 2009
By 
Ms. N. Goggin (England, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: An Autobiography: Or The Story of My Experiments With Truth (Paperback)
I have long held Gandhi in high esteem. It has been some time that I have been curious to know more about the man, his life and how he thought. What better way to learn about Gandhi than through the man's own autobiography? Reading Experiments in Truth has given me both the insight I wanted into Gandhi's life, and some great pearls of wisdom to apply in my own life.

Gandhi was clearly a principled man, who has led a fascinating life - a life in which he has staunchly stuck by his moral values at every stage, a life whose turnings have been steered by himself. It shows Gandhi's life was, as the title states, a series of experiments in truth.

Reading this book taught me a lot about Gandhi's life that I didn't previously know. It is certainly an inspirational read.

Gandhi always sought to understand all points of view about an issue, and no matter how bad somebody's deeds, he never wanted to have anything against them personally. In Gandhi's words:
Man and his deed are two distinct things...the doer of the deed, whether good or wicked, always deserves respect or pity as the case may be. `Hate the sin and not the sinner'.

In fact, one of Gandhi's principles in life was that every case can be seen from "no less than seven points of view, all of which are correct by themselves, but not correct at the same time and in the same circumstances". This is akin to modern-day NLP's presuppositions that "the map is not the territory" and that every behaviour has a positive intention. It goes without saying that he was a pioneer.

Gandhi, like so many determined and successful people, believed that what has happened is now in the past - we can learn lessons from past incidents for the future, and that is all.

So in summary, what I take from Gandhi's work is: live by your values; learn from the past but hold no regrets; in times of conflict, look at the situation from at least seven points of view and don't judge others by their actions. These values are very similar to those vaunted by many of today's motivational speakers. Yet Gandhi lived these values to free Indian people from oppression and suffering in many ways and staunchly rejected what he saw as excessive payment. Imagine how different the world would be like if more of today's motivational speakers acted out their values like Gandhi.

Gandhi conducted various other "experiments in truth". These included home schooling for his children (no formal learning), rejection of material wealth, enforced celibacy from the age of 37, fruitrianism (including limiting the variety of fruits that he ate) and quackery - all of which he forced upon his wife and family. I suspect that the families of motivational speakers are generally much happier than the family of Gandhi were!

This book is definitely worth reading. It gives Gandhi's own perspective on his life. Some of the details about various people he came across went over my head (and I started to skip some of them as I got further through the book) I will now follow Gandhi's principle of seeing everything from more than one perspective by reading someone else's biography of him.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't quite do this profound man the justice he deserves, 24 July 2008
Sadly I was a little disappointed with this. After watching Richard Attenborough's epic with Ben Kingsley, I was so inspired that I had to read more about this inspirational man, so I went straight to the library to get his autobiography.

When will I learn?! I'm not a big fan of autobiographies as, no matter how interesting the person, they tend to be dull and tedious, concentrating on the minutiae, rather than the overall bigger picture. As autobiographies go, this is a strange one. It is what it says on the cover - a series of brief descriptions of his many experiments with the principles of Satya (truth), Ahimsa (non-violence), Religion and Diet. It also charts his journeys through South Africa and India and his dealings with the Governments of the time, pioneering the principle of Satyagraha (mass civil disobedience). There are gaps, however, which was annoying as a reader when the Author declines to describe a particular event, but refers you to another of his books. However, Gandhi writes exquisitely, and his use of language is exemplary. In this respect it was a pleasure to read. Credit must also go to the translator of course, Mahadev Desai.

The theme which resonated most with me was, strangely, his experiments with religion. Strangely, as I'm an atheist. His quest for a better understanding of all religions is admirable. Perhaps if religious leaders all over the world were to be as reasonable and pragmatic as Gandhi, we might not have so many wars based on religion. Gandhi might not have agreed with all principles from every religion, but the very fact that he was willing to acknowledge their existence makes him a better man than most. India and the Indian people have a baffling number of religions and languages. It was interesting to learn a little more about the country at the time, the abject poverty, the politics, the caste system. His philanthropic nature is both bewildering and admirable. He had an inherent need to improve the lives of his fellow countrymen. He certainly was unique and its a shame that there are not more like him in the world today.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everyone should read this book, 6 Jun. 2005
In his own words Gandhi takes us through some of the experiences in his life, with each chapter forming at least one important learning lesson to him. All experiences, whether good or bad, had a positive learning lesson on him and contributed to his goal of seeking the truth.
One of his main beliefs was using non-violence as a means of protesting against acts of oppression and using international law to seek justice. This meant he never raised his fists or lowered himself to barbarism however much he was provoked, violated or attacked. In fact this seems to be the opposite attitude demonstrated by all terrorists and most countries (West, Middle East and East) where the belief is that violence and war works. It never has and never will. As Gandhi says "an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind".
As we have now entered the third of the world wars, where the weapons are horrific and the consequences unimaginable, Gandhi's words have never been more important. All politicians and world leaders should read this book. In fact everyone should read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read, 22 Jan. 2008
By 
Mr. T. Patel "tpatel" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have read this in the last 12 months and have to say that it is an eye opening book. The sacrifices made, the times it was set in and the general opposition in many countries to many foreigners makes me wonder how one man done so much in one life time.

Its not an easy read in my opinion, but certainly a book that tells it from MK Ghandis side. A book that i wanted to read as an Indian but more importantly as a human who queried how can one man change the world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of India, 29 July 2009
By 
Spilsbury (UK, Liverpool) - See all my reviews
This autobiography is an essential for anybody interested in grasping the zeitgeist of Indias struggle for freedom from Colonialism. Gandhi was a truly remarkable man, always seeking to improve himself from dietics, through to modest living, to the philosophy of self sufficiency. Yet a Lawyer, who had resided in South Africa and the UK, never afraid to confront injustice. One of the most remarkable men of the preceding century, a peacemaker, a man of quiet understated dignity, he more than most Indians laid the foundations for the post colonial state of India.
As an individual he sets an extraordinarily high standard for learning and the determination to self improvement, as a human being, pious with a feeling transcending denominational bias, never have figures in recent history like Gandhi been so sorely needed, or missed. His voice will speak to you, reaching out from mere pages.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great soul - rightly, 30 Jan. 2012
This review is from: An Autobiography: Or The Story of My Experiments With Truth (Paperback)
Growing up in India, used to have lessons of Gandhi in all 3 languages I studied. But the chapter was often looked upon in such disdain because of many ill reasons which I dont want to go to. But once I picked this book up - life has never been same to me - it moved me a great deal - broke me many times. I think I am not eligible to comment on Gandhi or his book. So its better I'll quote what Albert Einstein said about Gandhi: "Generations to come, it may well be, will scarce believe that such a man as this one ever in flesh and blood walked upon this Earth." Please pick up this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic autobiography, 19 Aug. 2011
By 
This review is from: An Autobiography: Or The Story of My Experiments With Truth (Paperback)
This book is well written and translated. It is divided into short chapters, providing for an easy read.

In this autobiography Gandhi tells of various interesting situations in his life, from mischief as a young teenager to untiring study to become a lawyer and his approach to religion.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the book that will give you lots of food for thought, 3 July 2000
By 
Gandhi was such a great man with visionary beyond his time. With courage, self-willed and disciplined mind. He was one of a few who can achieved what he did in one life time. I truly enjoyed this book and recommend it to anyone who is searching for the meaning of life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars INSPIRATIONAL, 4 Mar. 2011
This review is from: An Autobiography: Or The Story of My Experiments With Truth (Paperback)
After having seen the movie on Gandhi's life I was curious to learn more about this historical figure. Indeed there is a lot of information on his life in this book although, being an autobiography, it does not contain much info about his later years and his death. There is however all his philosophy and wisdom. On the down side I would say that the book sometimes becomes a little too detailed with regards to the countless names of people that he met. All in all a good buy at a very good price.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

An Autobiography: Or The Story of My Experiments With Truth
An Autobiography: Or The Story of My Experiments With Truth by M.K Gandhi (Paperback - 28 Jun. 2007)
£8.79
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews