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47 of 52 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended.
This is a fascinating book. I read a broad selection of the criticisms of this book in an attempt to gauge its authenticity. Much of the criticism is about his "Muslim credentials" and his portrayal of specific Islamic groups and it is quite easy to understand why the said groups have a vested interest in attacking these portrayals. Whilst I do not doubt for one moment Ed...
Published on 23 Aug. 2007 by Big Andy

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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Revelations of Ed Husain
As my only source of information about Islam was the news media, I was keen to hear the voice of someone who had direct experience of Islam. I did not know quite what to expect so I approached the book with an open mind trying desperately to put aside the influence of the news media. However, I must say that my journey through the book and the outcome was of no...
Published on 26 Sept. 2007 by Herman Norford


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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars interesting but...., 5 Feb. 2008
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
an interesting read, especially as a friend of mine has a son who got involved with an extreme group which i consider a religious cult, that praised suicide bombers and celebrated 9/11! however, i think Ed has, as with many who then change their mind, gone too far the other way! as another reviewer mentioned, he didnt consider the plight of the palestinians, the way the US and UK appease Israel and dont do enough to ameliorate the situation. He doesnt even consider that maybe the official version of 9/11 is full of holes, (see the press conference given by Senator Bob Graham on the 28 redacted pages, he calls the official 9/11 account a "cover up" and a betrayal of the 9/11 families, first responders, and survivors.)
Then of course, theres abu ghraib, the recent report on the CIA and the illegal use of torture, the way the CIA has helped train and arm Islamic extremists such as al Qaeda and i.s.
Yes extremism isnt the answer, two wrongs dont make a right but he hasnt really addressed these issues.
However, it is an interesting read.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A V WORRYING BK, 9 Jun. 2014
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
THIS CULTURE HAS MADE PIGS EAR OF THEIR OWN COUNTRIES NOW THE SAME PRICIPLES ARE BEING ENFORCED IN UK .NOTABLY IN EDUCATION WHERE ART AND LITERATURE HAVE BEEN REMOVED FRM SCHOOLS IN BIRMINGHAM AND CORRUPTION IN LAW.WHAT ARE THERE PEOPLE IN UK FOR.?
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6 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars REMARKABLE BOOK, 28 May 2007
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
I enjoyed Mr. Husain's account and his apparent personal evolution. One should ask however how it is that even a young man cannot clearly see the probable end result of consistently preaching hatred. I was interested in his analysis of the Saudi influence despite the fact that the Saudis themselves must feel somewhat insecure sitting on such an powder keg. What must be the saddest observation was the parallel of the verbal attacks between islamic factions in the UK and the violent acting out of this same hatred in the middle east. I trust the UK authorities take note somewhere in between their terribly busy agendas, tea-time and Glyndebourne.
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28 of 83 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The way of the Sufi, 5 May 2007
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
Hussain claims to be following the sufi way, whilst advocating everything the sufis stood against. In refuting Islamic extremism the author goes to the other extreme, to avocate secularism as a panacea for all the ills of the Muslim world from identity to governance. Despite promoting freedom and claiming to have become a free thinker, Hussain advocates curtailing political debate and enforcing censorship, which have been the route cause of much of the problems in the Middle East. In true New Labour fashion, Hussain uses the politics of fear to advocate a 'British Islam,' whilst the main attraction of Islam as the great plilosopher Iqbal (an authority on Rumi) has stated, is spiritualism rather than tribal nationalism. People do not trust a nation that so easily subverts it own principles of equality before the law, the presumption of innocence and the rights to a fair trail. To get a balanced appraoch to some of the exagerations found in this book please read Enemy Combatant by Muazzam Begg.

Finally there is a need to read the chapter on the Caliphate in ' the Reliance of the Traveller' translated by sheikh Nuh Ha Mim Keller whom Hussain quotes as an authority but denies the obligatory nature of the Caliphate in classical Islam. To this end the section on the delusions of would be Sufis is enlightening and is a reminder that real Sufis have never been the in bed with the establishment.
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4 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars slightly disappointing, 10 Sept. 2007
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
in general the book is fine and an eyeopener... but the last 50 pages were such a disappointment !!
so Mr. Hussein has a personal bad feelings towards KSA and Wahhabism and trying to use his book and the very convincing beginning to deform the image of the royal Saudi family ... i don't really know much of KSA but for instance; regarding the immigrant issue he pointed out KSA has no immigration program at all simply due to the high birth rate unlike the UK ... in Europe especially Germany where i live; illegal African immigrants are normally tracked and expelled to Africa where they might starve to death is that a better solution!! i don't think so! and regarding the racism issue... and race superiority hierarchy he claims to exist in Saudi... am speechless!
another thing is why does he move from one extreme(takfiri) to the other extreme(black magic or Sufism) is moderate Islam not good enough !? did Muhammad (pbuh) worship or even visited prophet's tombs?
and still blaming Arabs for not caring much for the African cause when they have pretty much of pain to deal with on their own... as moderate Muslim myself who happened to be European I personally believe Mr. Hussein wrote his own (honest) analysis which is biased by his own feelings and did not bring any new knowledge yet he did not acknowledge the nature of it and dealt with rumors and fairy tales (eg: the sufi and the sultan tale; the taxi driver and the bride) as plain facts ... and moving from jihads Islam to Sufi Islam is moving from one extreme to the other.
i had hoped he would have kept the book focusing on his journey in British Islam instead ! that is a pretty good read!
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ex Shia, 17 Oct. 2008
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
As an ex Shia I enjoyed many of the arguments that Ed presented in his book and it helped in my journey back towards more orthodox beliefs, namely, those of Ahl Sunnah.

I just regret the years of moving around groups and ideologies and hope that writings like this could have been available sooner.

With Salams
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Need to read!!!, 8 Nov. 2007
By 
L. S. Bhachoo - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
This book is well written and very insightful. The author has done a fantastic job to explain how extremism lives on and how its followers are nothing more than victims of manipulation and peer pressure. PLEASE READ THIS BOOK!!!!
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27 of 95 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Superficial analysis, 12 May 2007
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
Husain is happy to reinforce sterotypes and justifies this by saying he knows what inspires terrorists - but after reading the book I discovered that Husain was not a terrorist and that his account was dated and misleading. The groups he mentions, and their modus operandi, are more fluid and sophisticated now.

The book did not provide new answers or fresh information. The activities of Hizb ut-Tahrir and others have been well documented already. I have to ask why, when his experiences are firmly based in the 1990s, this book is being published now and is being greeted with an adulation that is both embarrassing and unwarranted.

The rhetoric of Gove, Phillips and now Hussain is worrying. They seem to be paving the road to a perpetual war against the Muslim world under the guise of the "war on terror" and continued support for dictatorship and oppression. On the domestic front in the West, they will heighten fear, suspicion and alienation by branding "extremists" all those who want peaceful regime change in the Muslim world through the return of the caliphate.
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4 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good book. good book little money, 6 Sept. 2007
By 
Ramish Patel (Birmingham) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
you buy book, very good book for money. very good written. 5 stars. very fast shipping.
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14 of 61 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Best used as toilet paper, 25 Sept. 2007
This review is from: The Islamist: Why I joined radical Islam in Britain, what I saw inside and why I left (Paperback)
I have not read such a poorly written book in a very long time. Cheaply cashing in on the incresing islamaphobic climate, "Ed" writes a rambling rant against his time with Hizb ut-Tahrir, as an opportunist - nothing else. How much insight can a man who left the Hizb in the 1990's offer? Was his aim really to provide analysis, or was he merely jumping on the band wagon as soon as the Labour Govt mentioned banning the organisation?

I too attended many of the Hizb's lectures in the early 1990's in East London. I never heard calls to annihilate the West and hate all non-Muslims, as claimed by Ed. In fact, I attended many of their talks whilst I was a Christian looking into Islaam. Instead, the Hizb denounced the concept of democracy - which is rejected by Islaam. The Hizb, like many orthodox Christian groups, denounced pornography, illicit relationships, homosexuality etc - all of which are forbidden in Islaam - mainstream Islaam.

Perhaps Ed's book didn't pull enough punches and that is why he had to to lie and resort to cheap sensationalism by naming Dhiren Barot as the "Esa" named in his book, when he was in fact an entirely different person. Another lie was that Bomber Asif Hanif was linked to the Hizb.

In short, this book is not worth the paper it is written on.
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