Customer Reviews


472 Reviews
5 star:
 (296)
4 star:
 (84)
3 star:
 (39)
2 star:
 (20)
1 star:
 (33)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


125 of 138 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW!
Right, where do i begin??? how did i ever live without reading this book?? i was told by some idiot that it was boring which put me off for a while, but i read it recently and was totally blown away!! It is honestly the most intense, passionate, maddening book i've ever read. It starts out strong and keeps on going, i actually had to force myself not to read it all in one...
Published on 29 Nov. 2001 by kerry_k46@hotmail.com

versus
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Norton's 'Wuthering Heights'
As you would expect from any Norton critical edition of a text, this is far more detailed than other editions. The notes at the bottom of the pages are decent - the handy translations of Joseph's dialect are helpful. (It must be said, however, these notes are not as extensive as the Penguin Classics edition.) It contains a selection of Emily Brontė's poetry, a detailed...
Published on 7 Jun. 2009 by Amazon Customer


‹ Previous | 1 2 348 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably the best novel of all time, 22 Nov. 2007
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This book is pure genius. I read it again, and again, and always find something new to admire. It is everything a book should be. It has fantastic characters, wonderful plotting, a pacy, suspenseful story which keeps you turning the pages and is so dense that it throws up new treasures after every read.
This is the only work of Emily Bronte apart from a few poems and some juvenailia, and it is my regret that we will never know if she could have surpassed this great book with her next.
The story is well known, but in brief it is the story of Heathcliff, a foundling, who is brought to the home of Catherine Earnshaw one dark and horrible night by her father who has found him on one of his business trips and decides to rescue him. Catherine and Heathcliff form an unbreakable bond which sustains them through great misfortune and on into death, and is one of the most romantic love stories of all time.
Their love however, is also destructive and terrible. It plays out against the background of the louring moors and their terrible grandeur, which reinforces the natural, brutal cruelty of their feelings for each other and everyone else. Their love is sadistic and at times horrific and the more tragedy that is heaped upon them, the more strangled and terrible their expressions of love become.
The characters of Heathcliff and Catherine are at times utterly vile and repulsive and it is a strength of Bronte's writing that despite this you still will them to have their happy ending, and can't help sympathising with them.
The narrative is fantastically complex, with narrators within narrators and stories within stories, so that Bronte is able to give us a 360 degree view of the story and make the characters completely three dimensional, showing all their humanity, good and bad.
This is the one book I would make compulsory reading for everyone, everywhere.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Twisted Tale of Obsession, Love, Class, Hate and Fate, 29 Sept. 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Wuthering Heights is a surprisingly modern novel given that its authorship predates our modern understanding of psychology. Like many modern novels, Ms. Bronte has also explored the darker side of human passions and psyches more thoroughly than the sunnier side. Heathcliff will remind you of classic characters whose lives were twisted by fate like Captain Ahab in Moby Dick, Erik in Phantom of the Opera, Quasimodo in The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, and the mysterious prisoner in The Man in the Iron Mask.

If there were ever two star-crossed lovers who have captured the world's imagination since Romeo and Juliet, they must be Catherine and Heathcliff. Yet, unlike, many such pairs, their unhappiness is heavily influenced by themselves.

As you contemplate their story, you are constantly drawn to the thought, "what if" thus and such had occurred differently? That's part of the great power of the story because it has so many unexpected twistings and turnings. A reader's expectations from a love story are turned upside down, sideways and diagonal from where those expectations normally rest. As a result, you'll probably decide this isn't a love story after all . . . but a tragedy. Taken from that perspective, you'll find yourself hearing echoes of Lady Macbeth and King Lear as you contemplate what occurs when the natural order is disturbed. Few English authors since Shakespeare have captured that sense of what can happen when the universe is disarranged.

What's great about this story? It's pretty simple: Emotional intensity in the writing; deeply memorable characters; doomed lovers; and a haunting glimpse at unshakeable obsession.

What's not so great? The story development itself is pretty awkward. Much of the story is told in flashback which steals power and immediacy from the narration. If ever a story cried out for being told in the first person (by Heathcliff, Catherine, Edgar Linton, Hareton and young Catherine), it's Wuthering Heights. The transitions from one key moment to another are often very abrupt. Sometimes it is 150 pages later before you get the full sense of what Emily Bronte meant to convey in some of those transitions.

What's less than great? The characters aren't nearly as appealing as those you'll usually find in a novel dealing with these issues. In that sense, the novel is more realistic than fictional . . . which helps create some of its immense power. It's probably a worthwhile price to pay.

Whatever you think of Wuthering Heights, you owe it to yourself to read one of the most moving tales that has ever been written. Pick a time when you're feeling reasonably happy to start the book. Otherwise, you may find your mood to be more than a little darkened for a few days.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Twisted Tale of Obsession, Love, Class, Hate and Fate, 29 Sept. 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Wuthering Heights is a surprisingly modern novel given that its authorship predates our modern understanding of psychology. Like many modern novels, Ms. Bronte has also explored the darker side of human passions and psyches more thoroughly than the sunnier side. Heathcliff will remind you of classic characters whose lives were twisted by fate like Captain Ahab in Moby Dick, Erik in Phantom of the Opera, Quasimodo in The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, and the mysterious prisoner in The Man in the Iron Mask.

If there were ever two star-crossed lovers who have captured the world's imagination since Romeo and Juliet, they must be Catherine and Heathcliff. Yet, unlike, many such pairs, their unhappiness is heavily influenced by themselves.

As you contemplate their story, you are constantly drawn to the thought, "what if" thus and such had occurred differently? That's part of the great power of the story because it has so many unexpected twistings and turnings. A reader's expectations from a love story are turned upside down, sideways and diagonal from where those expectations normally rest. As a result, you'll probably decide this isn't a love story after all . . . but a tragedy. Taken from that perspective, you'll find yourself hearing echoes of Lady Macbeth and King Lear as you contemplate what occurs when the natural order is disturbed. Few English authors since Shakespeare have captured that sense of what can happen when the universe is disarranged.

What's great about this story? It's pretty simple: Emotional intensity in the writing; deeply memorable characters; doomed lovers; and a haunting glimpse at unshakeable obsession.

What's not so great? The story development itself is pretty awkward. Much of the story is told in flashback which steals power and immediacy from the narration. If ever a story cried out for being told in the first person (by Heathcliff, Catherine, Edgar Linton, Hareton and young Catherine), it's Wuthering Heights. The transitions from one key moment to another are often very abrupt. Sometimes it is 150 pages later before you get the full sense of what Emily Bronte meant to convey in some of those transitions.

What's less than great? The characters aren't nearly as appealing as those you'll usually find in a novel dealing with these issues. In that sense, the novel is more realistic than fictional . . . which helps create some of its immense power. It's probably a worthwhile price to pay.

Whatever you think of Wuthering Heights, you owe it to yourself to read one of the most moving tales that has ever been written. Pick a time when you're feeling reasonably happy to start the book. Otherwise, you may find your mood to be more than a little darkened for a few days.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The story of an all-consuming love that never dies..., 17 Jan. 2009
By 
This has to be one of the most classic, enduring love stories of all time - only with so much more bite than many of its genre. Wuthering Heights tells the compelling tale of Catherine Earnshaw and her friend Heathcliff, a ragamuffin brought into her family, his origins unknown, when she was a child. The pair become inseparable, but fate tears them apart when Heathcliff, rejected, runs away and Catherine moves on, ignoring her heart's desire for her old friend and instead marrying the blonde, beautiful and aristocratic Edgar Linton. When childbirth and illness claim Cathy's life, Heathcliff, now a man, but turned cruel and bitter, curses her to walk the earth and torment him until he dies.

Over the years, his twisted thoughts and the pain of having to live with Cathy's daughter and nephew, constant reminders of what he has lost, drive him to terrible cruelty and eventually to such madness that his mind and body can't take it any more. After all, only in death can he and Cathy be reunited on the wild moors, and find peace at last in the deserted ruin of their beloved Wuthering Heights.

Brontė's masterpiece is a bleak, despairing, yet incredibly intense and vibrantly feisty novel which will live forever in the hearts of its readers. She brings the Yorkshire moors alive, and creates an electric force of sensuality and romance that is even more remarkable given that she tragically never had any of these experiences herself. Read it and keep her magic alive!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, 15 Jun. 1999
By A Customer
At times the reader despises a character in this book, the next minute he/she loves him/her (and vice versa)! All characters have flaws: Cathy's haughtiness, Edgar's wimpiness, Linton's peevishness, Heathcliff's evilness, but these flaws only make the characters more interesting.
Take Hareton and Heathcliff for instance; both posses a strong and profound character instilled with a certain degree of pride, and both posses the potential for becoming good or evil. Heathcliff becomes revenge-driven because he once had been loved and his love is taken away by Edgar, who is not even, according to Heathcliff, capable of being loved: "I was a fool to fancy for a moment that she valued Edgar Linton's attachment more than mine. If he loved her with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years as I could in a day...It is not in him to be loved like me; how can she love in him what he has not?" Heathcliff is angered because he knows Cathy still loves him but is wasting her love on Edgar, who doesn't even deserve her love and is making her worse by trying to care for her: "He might as well plant an oak in a flowerpot and expect it to thrive as imagine he can restore her to vigour in the soil of his shallow cares." When Heathcliff was loved by Cathy, he had the potential to become good, but when he is deprived of her love, he becomes evil.
Very engrossing book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a single likeable character, but still a likeable book!, 30 Jun. 2014
When Mr Lockwood visits Wuthering Heights he encounters a strange group of relations, and eager to find out more he enlists their old housekeeper Nelly to find out more.

Wuthering Heights wasn’t exactly what I expected, being famed as a love story, it was also a story of revenge. Due to this there was a great deal of hatred, coldness, and violence which depicts humanity at its worst. Whilst some of it reflects the impassioned rage when one quarrels with someone they love, it was still rather different from what I expected.

Additionally, it surprised me how unlikeable the majority of the characters were. The characters were often childish, selfish, and often downright detestable, though this was broken up by occasional loving tender moments. My favourite character was the narrator for the majority of the story, Nelly. She gave a warm motherly feeling to the whole story.

Despite these surprises, I did really enjoy the book. Brontė has an excellent descriptive style, and her sections on the landscapes made me long to wander about the moors. I found Joseph’s northern speech difficult to decipher but there is little of this. You learn the characters well and understand their motivations even in their most extreme impassioned actions.

Overall, I’d recommend this book wholeheartedly, but be aware that this is a different kind of love story, a tale of how love can destroy individuals.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The dark and brooding tale of Cathy & Heathcliff, 24 Mar. 2007
By 
Misfit (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
What a great experience to finally reread this classic as an adult. Emily Bronte depicts a very gothic and depressing story of two star-crossed (but not terribly likeable) lovers, Cathy & Heathcliff, and the love between them that transcended the grave. Added to that a wonderful depiction of the dark English moors and the local characters with their strange dialects. This was also told in a very unusual style, like a tale within a tale within a tale, adding more layers and perspectives to the story.

How unfortunate that one's upbringing can so affect a person that their grief and bitterness turn what could have been a fine young man into such a hateful and vengeful person as Heathcliff became. And fortunate that Cathy's daughter and Hareton could overcome their dark upbringing to bring a happier light onto the dark moors of England.

I did not read this version of the book, but one including works of the other Bronte sisters, which did not have all the footnotes. I think I enjoyed that better as I wasn't constantly distracted by looking to the back for the notes and just allowed myself to become engrossed with the story. It's one book you have to read at least twice in your life -- of course in school as required reading and then again as an adult to add that perspective of age and experience in life so that one can more fully appreciate a such a classic tale
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Norton's 'Wuthering Heights', 7 Jun. 2009
By 
Amazon Customer (Hamilton, Scotland) - See all my reviews
As you would expect from any Norton critical edition of a text, this is far more detailed than other editions. The notes at the bottom of the pages are decent - the handy translations of Joseph's dialect are helpful. (It must be said, however, these notes are not as extensive as the Penguin Classics edition.) It contains a selection of Emily Brontė's poetry, a detailed account of the editorial process after the novel's initial publication, and a wide selection of reviews from when the text first appeared.

For a Norton Critical Edition I did feel it was slightly light with regard to more recent criticism. It contains just five recent critical essays - one of which is on the problems associated with depicting Heathcliff in film versions of the text. Where, for example, is Dorothy Van Ghent's important 'On Wuthering Heights'?

This is probably the best edition any reader of this text could buy. It is not, however, as exhaustive as one might like.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


40 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic that fits no genre, 3 Feb. 2003
WH is, essentially, a story about turbulent people living in a turbulent place. I don’t think Bronte meant her characters to fit certain “social types” or be analogies for something else but to be real people unfortunately in very difficult circumstances and I believe that is how WH is best read.
As dark, haunting and changeable as the other Bronte sisters’ infamous classic: Charlotte’s Jane Eyre is personal and gently loving- the two novels are both works of genius but a million miles from each other. However, both have wonderful descriptions of the Yorkshire moors and a sense of real feeling behind their story line.
One of WH strengths is its change of narrative voice- there are two main narrators and letters and other media between. This gives a sense of many people affected by one story thus heightening the strength of Heathcliff and Cathy’s passion.
The end of WH is one of the most discussed in literature and if you are reading it for the first time the question of whether it’s happy or not will occupy you for a long time.
With so much literary criticism spent on WH it is difficult to add original comments. So I would simply urge you, if you haven’t read it yet, to get a copy- it will live with you forever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Demented brilliance, 4 Sept. 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
There are probably all sorts of misconceptions about this book by those who've never read it - certainly I had a preconceived idea which bore no relation at all to the reality. The story of Catherine and Heathcliff is generally thought of as one of the great love stories and, though it is, it is a very dark and twisted love - Romeo and Juliet this ain't!
Their love is wild, fevered, uncontrollable, possibly unconsumated and utterly doomed, and as characters they pretty dispicable - jealous, selfish, manipulative and, in Heathcliff's case, violent, abusive and extraordinarily vindictive. When Gordon Brown was asked which literary character he most resembled, he cited Heathcliff. He obviously hadn't read the bits where Heathcliff physically and mentally abuses children and women and, at one point, stamps on another man's head! The setting is bleak, Gothic and otherworldly, with none of the cosiness of Pride and Prejudice or the sweet, God-fearing goodness of Jane Eyre.
There are problems with the novel - it has a non-linear structure which, while groundbreaking, is at times hard to follow, and it seems almost as if, towards the end, Emily Bronte is getting bored of the whole business. But although flawed, it is nevertheless breathtakingly, dementedly brilliant, and not quite like anything else.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 348 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Wuthering Heights (Penguin Classics)
Wuthering Heights (Penguin Classics) by Emily Brontė (Mass Market Paperback - 4 Jun. 2009)
£6.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews