Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars22
3.1 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 24 December 2007
I feel that Obsession shows that Kellerman has really found his form. He continues now with his theme of indepth sleuthing with the aid of the fine Milo Sturgis. He appears to enjoy the complicated plots, intrigue and detective work. And his use of conversation mainly between Delaware and Sturgis is excellent. Perhaps more of his psychiatry would be great. But for Delaware fans this is an excellent book.
0Comment7 of 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 50 REVIEWERon 2 November 2012
Generally I would expect to enjoy any of Jonathan Kellerman's Alex Delaware series, having read quite a few of them over the years. I thought this one started off quite promisingly with Alex himself in the taking centre stage. However, it proved to be a strange book which definitely got bogged down and overly complicated in places and concluded with a whimper rather than a bang.

Tanya, a young woman who Alex has treated for OCD in the past, has just lost her adopted mother to cancer. Her mother's dying words were that she had been involved in a terrible event which was taken to mean that she had killed someone. Milo and Alex got involved and from then onwards there is a detailed investigation of the many places Tanya and her mother had lived over the years and the various deaths which took place in those vicinities. Of course, whilst the truth is eventually teased out most of this investigatory work is, in the end irrelevant. However, it does cover many rather tedious pages without taking the story forward.

The climax was, in the end, not very climactic and the author then seemed to need to draw things out for another twenty or so pages for no good reason that was obvious. So overall its an OK read, but far from the best from this author.
0Comment2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Fans of Jonathan Kellerman's Alex Delaware novels will be pleased that Obsession features lots of Alex Delaware playing judicious shrink (both to a patient and in solving crimes) and plenty of Milo investigating. For those who don't like Robin, she plays a tiny role in this story.

The story starts off with a very strong premise: A former patient, Tanya Bigelow, wants his help in contacting Milo to get some help in checking out what seems to be a death-bed confession from her adopted mother, Patty, a highly regarded ER nurse. Alex correctly points out that there may be no crime at all, but Tanya wants to know. Tanya becomes Alex's patient again as her obsessive-compulsive tendencies resurface in the wake of becoming an orphan for the second time. Part of the appeal of the story is that you'll be rooting for Tanya throughout. That makes it easier to emotionally relate to the mystery.

The book soon bogs down into an extensive procedural that involves checking out all of the crimes associated with the areas around the places where Patty and Tanya had lived. Very little of this digging turns out to be relevant to solving the Patty mystery . . . but new questions arise as the investigation triggers strong reactions that pull Alex and Milo toward different puzzles. Along the way, you'll meet some pretty unappealing (at best) and disgusting (at worst) characters who will usually surprise you by acting more unpleasantly than you expect. I felt like I needed a long shower with lots of soap to get the filth off me after reading this book.

The characters are either drawn in very simple terms, or stay exactly the same throughout the book, with the exception of Tanya. Thank God for that! Otherwise, you will often feel like you are reading an overly plot-driven novel where the characters don't matter.

If you like intricate plots, you'll feel like you've got a dandy here. For my taste, the plot development seemed like it was overdone. I would have been happier with a simpler plot that moved along faster in a shorter book.

If abnormal psychology is your thing, Obsession is rich in that vein. You'll get keen insights into at least two different types that you probably don't run across every day.

The book's charm is mostly wrapped up in many short sequences involving Blanche, Alex's dog. These sections are fine enough to make you want to see a whole book that revolves around Alex and Blanche.

For those who like intricate plots and adore abnormal psychology, Obsession will be a four- or a five-star book.
0Comment20 of 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 February 2009
Don't get me wrong I love Jonathan Kellerman's book, in particular the Alex Delaware novels, but Obsession isn't the best. Perhaps it was the mood I was in when I read it but I found it, and I hate to say this, boring (sorry Jonathan) & I didn't really care what happened to the characters.
0Comment2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 July 2008
Totally agree with R Clary. I've read all Kellerman's books and have never found one so difficult to read. Too slow and the incessant changing possibilities debated by the detectives about what might have happened bored me to tears. I suspected more than once these were just to fill as many pages as possible as they certainly didn't pique my interest. Although I started out interested in Tanya her constant references to her sainted 'Mommy' got on my nerves quite quickly.
I'll be glad to finish this book but fortunately I've enjoyed enough Kellerman novels to give the next one a try.
0Comment1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 March 2015
My first impression was - With so many characters sprouting out of nowhere, I was really curious about how they were all going to connect. Was it a single murder with multiple layers of mystery? Or was there more than one murder that would then lead back to one person. Even from the start, Robin's lack of appearance and Tanya's reappearance were warning bells that this may not be as good as the other Delaware books.

As I got to the middle, I felt - Curiouser and curiouser. Patty is turning out to be a crook. Was her deathbed confession real? I'm really torn and have to finish now. After everything she has done for Tanya, I cannot imagine Patty being capable of murder but a mother does everything she can to protect her child. Soooo .... I'm having a fingernail chewing moment considering the end of this story.

As I neared the end, I thought - Hmmmm. Tanya is more complexed than I thought. While some people may see a selfish young girl, her fear shows up as different obsessions and OCD routines. The manner in which the characters are all connected in the end was bizarre. In some ways, you want to say - come on, get real. Then it does make sense. For 15 to 20 years, all of this has been growing. Churning. Patty's confession then creates a domino effect and results in at least three murders including two cold cases being solved. Truly didn't see that coming.

My final impression and recommendations - Alex Delaware is consistent in this story as he is in the other books. For this sake, I would say read the book. Robin continues to be a mystery to me. I'm not sure I understand her purpose in the series or in Alex's life. She is absent, shows up and for the most part Alex receives support from Milo. One day, I'll figure out this strange relationship. In the meantime, if you are looking for a compelling, mystery that is well-written, Kellerman is your man.

Disclosure - As a Quality Reads UK Book Club member, I received a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I received no monetary compensation for my book review. This book review is based on my thoughts, opinion and understanding of the book. This book review does not reflect the opinion of other book club members.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Fans of Jonathan Kellerman's Alex Delaware novels will be pleased that Obsession features lots of Alex Delaware playing judicious shrink (both to a patient and in solving crimes) and plenty of Milo investigating. For those who don't like Robin, she plays a tiny role in this story.

The story starts off with a very strong premise: A former patient, Tanya Bigelow, wants his help in contacting Milo to get some help in checking out what seems to be a death-bed confession from her adopted mother, Patty, a highly regarded ER nurse. Alex correctly points out that there may be no crime at all, but Tanya wants to know. Tanya becomes Alex's patient again as her obsessive-compulsive tendencies resurface in the wake of becoming an orphan for the second time. Part of the appeal of the story is that you'll be rooting for Tanya throughout. That makes it easier to emotionally relate to the mystery.

The book soon bogs down into an extensive procedural that involves checking out all of the crimes associated with the areas around the places where Patty and Tanya had lived. Very little of this digging turns out to be relevant to solving the Patty mystery . . . but new questions arise as the investigation triggers strong reactions that pull Alex and Milo toward different puzzles. Along the way, you'll meet some pretty unappealing (at best) and disgusting (at worst) characters who will usually surprise you by acting more unpleasantly than you expect. I felt like I needed a long shower with lots of soap to get the filth off me after reading this book.

The characters are either drawn in very simple terms, or stay exactly the same throughout the book, with the exception of Tanya. Thank God for that! Otherwise, you will often feel like you are reading an overly plot-driven novel where the characters don't matter.

If you like intricate plots, you'll feel like you've got a dandy here. For my taste, the plot development seemed like it was overdone. I would have been happier with a simpler plot that moved along faster in a shorter book.

If abnormal psychology is your thing, Obsession is rich in that vein. You'll get keen insights into at least two different types that you probably don't run across every day.

The book's charm is mostly wrapped up in many short sequences involving Blanche, Alex's dog. These sections are fine enough to make you want to see a whole book that revolves around Alex and Blanche.

For those who like intricate plots and adore abnormal psychology, Obsession will be a four- or a five-star book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 20 June 2008
Something of a return to form - and certainly an improvement on the last two in the series (Rage & Therapy). I found this both an engaging read and a satisfying whodunit.

Thankfully, Robyn's presence was kept to a minimum as were the Koi and, strangely, I found the new dog less irritating than the last. Milo's grey sideburns don't get a mention this time around though his bunions are referenced in compensation along with his standard pockmarked face, flab and shocking dress sense so Kellerman's readership are reassured yet again that Dr Delaware is unlikely to have a gay moment any time soon.

Plot-wise, I found it a real page-turner. Read it with enthusiasm. Intelligent and well-crafted. Not his absolute best but close to it. Recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 May 2008
Not much different from the other Alex Delaware novels. And exactly that's my problem with it: same characters, no surprises (okay, apart from the new dog), psychopath about town. Alex delves into the past and uncovers hidden secrets. So the plot is well executed but essentially the umpteenth version of the same story. I wonder why Kellerman never spices up the plot by having Milo and Alex running in the wrong direction. However far fetched theit hypothesis are: they are always right. From my point of view after I don't know how many books the Delaware formula has gone stale. But all in all it's solid entertainment. But if you've read the other novels you will forget this one right after having read it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
Fans of Jonathan Kellerman's Alex Delaware novels will be pleased that Obsession features lots of Alex Delaware playing judicious shrink (both to a patient and in solving crimes) and plenty of Milo investigating. For those who don't like Robin, she plays a tiny role in this story.

The story starts off with a very strong premise: A former patient, Tanya Bigelow, wants his help in contacting Milo to get some help in checking out what seems to be a death-bed confession from her adopted mother, Patty, a highly regarded ER nurse. Alex correctly points out that there may be no crime at all, but Tanya wants to know. Tanya becomes Alex's patient again as her obsessive-compulsive tendencies resurface in the wake of becoming an orphan for the second time. Part of the appeal of the story is that you'll be rooting for Tanya throughout. That makes it easier to emotionally relate to the mystery.

The book soon bogs down into an extensive procedural that involves checking out all of the crimes associated with the areas around the places where Patty and Tanya had lived. Very little of this digging turns out to be relevant to solving the Patty mystery . . . but new questions arise as the investigation triggers strong reactions that pull Alex and Milo toward different puzzles. Along the way, you'll meet some pretty unappealing (at best) and disgusting (at worst) characters who will usually surprise you by acting more unpleasantly than you expect. I felt like I needed a long shower with lots of soap to get the filth off me after reading this book.

The characters are either drawn in very simple terms, or stay exactly the same throughout the book, with the exception of Tanya. Thank God for that! Otherwise, you will often feel like you are reading an overly plot-driven novel where the characters don't matter.

If you like intricate plots, you'll feel like you've got a dandy here. For my taste, the plot development seemed like it was overdone. I would have been happier with a simpler plot that moved along faster in a shorter book.

If abnormal psychology is your thing, Obsession is rich in that vein. You'll get keen insights into at least two different types that you probably don't run across every day.

The book's charm is mostly wrapped up in many short sequences involving Blanche, Alex's dog. These sections are fine enough to make you want to see a whole book that revolves around Alex and Blanche.

For those who like intricate plots and adore abnormal psychology, Obsession will be a four- or a five-star book.
0Comment3 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.