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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Examining some skeletons in Americas closet
Michael Moore seems to be a fine patriot, in the finest sense of the word. Not following the blind opinion that "my country is the best, my countrymen are the best", he turns the spotlight on his own people and is heavily critical of American politics, politicians, culture, but in a highly amusing and irreverant fashion. The chapters on the election of President Dubya are...
Published on 18 Nov 2002 by Bill Quigley

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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great on sentiment, light on substance...
Michael Moore, I take my slightly grubby baseball hat off to you sir...
I found 'Stupid White Men', although genuine to its very core, to be slightly naive. However, the simplicity could be the intention of the author.
If Moore, and I believe this to be the case, wants to reach Middle America with his views then I think he succeeds. If the book is an attempt to...
Published on 14 Mar 2003 by Mr James T Ellis


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Examining some skeletons in Americas closet, 18 Nov 2002
Michael Moore seems to be a fine patriot, in the finest sense of the word. Not following the blind opinion that "my country is the best, my countrymen are the best", he turns the spotlight on his own people and is heavily critical of American politics, politicians, culture, but in a highly amusing and irreverant fashion. The chapters on the election of President Dubya are fascinating reading. Similarly, his opinions on the so-called "recycling" trend, are thought-provoking and intelligent. Moore is a fine patriot because with his unique style of questioning and challenging of the authorities, he is seeking to improve the society in which he lives. Moore cares enough to take unpopular stands against big business, and throughout the book he encourages us to look beyond the obvious when following the news, and to take an active part in society rather than letting it pass us by.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps Michael Moore's greatest work yet, 10 Jan 2003
By 
America is a land with disintegrating environment, an unelected Government of moronic, corrupt and self-important charlatans, a culture of ignorance, especialyl about the wider world, and prides itself on justice and concern for African-Americans when it is in fact guilty of the exact opposite. All this and more is exposed by Michael Moore, in savegely funny style.
The exact facts of the elecetion campaign- the removal of scores of black voters from the Florida electoral register, achieved by a Republican senator working with Jeb Bush, the confusing ballot form which led many Jews to mistakenly vote for a right-wing Anti-Semite when they aaimed ot elect Al Gore, and the efforts to corrupt the military vote- are galling for anyone who believes in American Democracy, and the mentions of Enron involvement take on extra severity now that millions have lost their savings in the whole fiasco.
His seciton about how he fears white people is hilarious, especially his suggestions for black people to place 'whites only' signs in places where black people are essnetially denied entry, and his questionas to why the violent lyrics of Bruce Springsteen and The Dixie Chicks are not criticised in the way rappers are. Gee, let me think.....
He also looks at international issues from a sideways perspective. The notion that the problems of Northern Ireland can be solved by everyone going Catholic, and his list of reasons why they should, is tongue-in-cheek and should be taken as such.
The final chapter is also amusing, detailing his history of involvement with Ralph Nader, and expressing his voiew on how unfair the public have been in accusing him of costing Gore the election. Perfectly true, and a finning finale to a book for everyone who fele the spirit of the 60s still alive.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great on sentiment, light on substance..., 14 Mar 2003
Michael Moore, I take my slightly grubby baseball hat off to you sir...
I found 'Stupid White Men', although genuine to its very core, to be slightly naive. However, the simplicity could be the intention of the author.
If Moore, and I believe this to be the case, wants to reach Middle America with his views then I think he succeeds. If the book is an attempt to galvanise an electorate even more apathetic and disaffected than in this country then I think he succeeds.
Where I think the book fails is in its inability to be much more than a tub-thumping rant. That is his style and I accept that, but by doing this he suffocates some serious points and skirts some issues which he could have spent more time discussing rather than say, his reasons for choosing to buy a mini-van. However as I say, he is a comedian and while trying to keep the theme light, you can forgive the authors reluctance to substantiate his statements with any real depth.
The exception to this I would say is the fantastic expose of the Bush/Cheney election farce. This first chapter of the book is worth the price alone. If an American citizen can read and understand this without wanting to vomit on the lawn of the white house, then they are a more tolerant nation than I give them credit for.
I think Moore is going for the populist vote and why not? It needs more books of this nature to be read by the masses that perhaps cannot get to grips with other political texts.
Stupid White Men is funny and intelligent. It's a good diversion from more serious authors such as Chomsky and Pilger and certainly one for the uninitiated.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Factually contestable but a good laugh!, 28 Jan 2003
By 
Julia Whitfield (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Michael Moore's book Stupid White Men assesses the questionable state of modern American politics and its democracy with a critical eye. The book provides a refreshing and humorous review of American politics, which the myopic mainstream American media has neglected. It is a political easy read, which may be why it's remained on The New York Times bestseller list for over forty weeks running. This accessibility may also explain why its popularity has surpassed many other books regarding American politics published over the last two years. Despite Moore's popularity his writing does require some literary and journalistic criticism.
Moore's rants of rage through personal attacks and cheap shots at the Bush administration and the rich are comical but detract from the real political issues and the validity of his arguments. The book is laced with "facts and figures" but lacks the academic finesse and journalistic integrity of a true documentary. If one were inclined to check all of his footnote references (like Ben Fitz), it would be obvious that at least some of his facts are inaccurate. Anyone with a slightly sceptical mind would be inclined to confirm most of these facts elsewhere before quoting them to a friend. And if you've learned anything from the book, you will check all the facts you're reading!
Despite some factual flaws it is a pleasant relief to see some Americans critically examining their country's politics at home and abroad. And if nothing else, the book will definitely get you laughing out loud.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not always right, but willing to have a damn good go., 3 Mar 2004
If you are at all concerned about the direction in which the "free world" is stumbling blindly after 9-11, then you should read this. If you are not concerned, you should DEFINITELY read this.
The first chapter alone, about the tactics used by Bush to "win" the last presidential election, will bring an involuntary grimace to your face. You always thought there was something fishy about Florida... now read the facts. They are more appallingly fascinating than you ever imagined. I will never write "President" Bush again without the adjective in quotes.
However, this is not just a rabid anti-Bush diatribe. In the interest of fairness, Moore brings us up to date on the state of the Democratic party. Admitting that while a Democrat in the hand is better than two Bushes in the Whitehouse, they do not represent any real alternative by way of policy.
Refreshingly, Moore keeps his faith, and presents some positive advice on how to stop the corporate rot. This ranges from simple tips for the lone reader in the West, to an ambitious directive to the entire oppressed Palestinian population describing how to organise an efficient and effective protest. His solutions to the World's ills, when not obviously facetious, are based upon common-sense and fair-mindedness. For example, his solution the crisis in the Middle-East could have been thought up any well-educated, round-minded individual willing to have a decent stab at it. And, as it happens, would probably work. His strength is not to devise some revelatory masterplan for World Peace, but to state the obvious and raise the harder question: "so why hasn't anybody tried this"?
As the chapters roll eagerly on at speed, subject matter can vary in quality. While many observations are sharp and hard to disagree with, the occasional assertion (e.g. Mad Cow disease is a bigger plague than AIDs) seems somewhat harder to swallow. The book also becomes more personal towards the end, so your level of enjoyment will depend on how much you are interested in Moore himself, rather than the state of the nation. It has to be said though, that the two are hard to separate. As Moore bitterly recounts failed personal encounters with the Bush family, his fustration with the Ralph Nader camp, and other peoples' fustration with Moore's connection with the Raplh Nader camp, it is hard not to be sympathetic.
But Moore is not looking for your sympathy, he is looking to change the World, before the goons at the top take all our rights away.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 24 Mar 2003
By 
C. A. Kyprianou "Chris" (Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Michael Moore's book promises much - it begins with a ferocious attack on the legitimacy of George Bush's presidency and feels as if it is not merely opinion but well researched and based on real facts. From this promising beginning, it fades into a rather bland and not very interesting discourse on views Michael Moore has. Some you nod your head to, others he tries to dismiss with comic touches that don't succeed that leave the book flat and uneven. The middle of the book also feels that what he is saying is merely conjecture and extrapolation. I'd like to say it's a great companion book to Fast Food Nation (Eric Schlosser) but it ain't nowehere close. A pity.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some good points, some bad ones, but worth reading., 5 April 2003
By A Customer
Like most reviewers it seems, I found the most interesting chapter was the first one, which concerned the presidential elections and the goings-on in Florida in particular. Unfortunately, after this early peak the book never quite reaches the same heights again, although there are some other scattered gems such as some of Bush's connections (including Kenneth L. Ray, the former head of the former Enron) and the salaries of US airline pilots. Mostly though, I found this book was the usual anti-establishment rant with no real answers to the issues it addressed. Sure, some good points are made, but Michael then shoots himself in the foot with conclusions that only someone with a tunnel vision political viewpoint could possibly reach. It's hard to believe that anyone thinks that Bush invaded Afghanistan to set up an oil pipeline, or that the US and not Pol Pot was responsible for the Cambodian "Killing Fields", yet these implications are there.
The book is supposedly humorous, but to be honest, I didn't laugh all that much. In fact, the humour is often used to disguise the fact that the author doesn't really have any solutions to a lot of the world's problems. He jokingly suggests that Northern Ireland problem is solved by the Protestants converting to Catholicism. I can tell you, they won't be laughing much in Belfast at that one. Similarly naive remarks are made for Yugoslavia, North Korea and Palestine. I could go on.
In the end, this is an interesting book, because it tells us as much about Michael as it does about Bush, and strangely there are similarities. The author consistently lists policies such as anti-abortion, positive discrimination, as well as the whole war/anti-war issue without even stopping to consider whether there might be at least some room for debate. For him, it is a given that his views on these matters are correct. That said though, the author's books and films have always encouraged the readers and viewers to ask their own questions, so I have to be fair and say that the we are at least empowered to disagree with him.
I recommend reading this, but stand back a bit, take it all in, read some other material and make your own decisions. Not everything in this book is right. There are a lot of stupid white men around, and it's possible that the author might be one of them.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wake-up call for all the conservative and oblivious, 31 Mar 2003
Anyone who asks the questions some only briefly glance over in their heads, and some who are too afraid to ask, should stop at "Stupid White Men" for guidance and important world and political information.
Using his patented form of dry, sarcastic humour mixed with cold hard statistics and consistently interesting opinion and fact, Michael Moore provides a unique and deep insight into the inner networks of authority in the US invisible to Joe Public.
Each chapter tackles varying subjects from racism, corruption, political alienation, and maybe the most controversial subject this side of Florida, the presidential election.
Moore takes a hold of you right from the amazing story of the books publication within the introduction, and leads you with his eyes wide open.
No stone is left unturned and no statement is made with anything less than an enthusiastic exuberance for the truth and fearless abandon. His thirst and quest for that truth behind the political movements that affect us all is exemplary and handled with a defiant but always humorous edge.
I for one read the chapter entitled "Mr Whitey" which tackles the abundance of racism still visible today, and am grateful to have been educated in such a way that it is hard to not be amused and inspired simultaneously.
The book proves difficult for your eyes to read fast enough, as it engages your curiosity and begins to turn it into willing participation in his revolution.
At times, he borders on frustrated activist, but it never adds weight to the read, and what are we if we're not active in seeking the truth? Institutionalised by the rules governed by those who Moore reveals can break or bend them at their own discretion? I know which way I'd rather go.
After the events of 9/11, after news that war has been waged with Iraq, the majority of the populous are beginning to look for answers regarding the stability and credibility of the governments and leaders of the world we live in.
In Michael Moore, the rights of Freedom of Speech/Expression under the American constitution allow him the leg room to provide some of the truths we seek behind corruption, hypocrisy and the alleged by-passing of constitutional law.
Anyone who wonders why, anyone who wonders who and what was specifically at the fore the Florida incident, anyone who wants to know fact over fabrication; this is where you should start. No wonder various institutions have tried to put a muzzle on him.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not totally convinced, 7 Dec 2002
I am a big fan of Michael Moore's work and was hoping for something a little more heavyweight than this entertaining, but ultimately slightly disappointing read. In particular, I found his suggestions to bring about world peace seemed, dare I say it, a little naive. That said, it is a good read and I would say not a bad starting point to explore some of the problems afflicting our modern democracies.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tries to cover too much., 5 April 2003
This book starts off very impressively with how George Bush 'stole' the election. I was totally amazed at Moore's depth of research - not a surprise considering his previous work. What lets the book down is a rather inane chapter that suggests, albeit tongue in cheek (I hope), solutions for the problems in places like Northern Ireland, the Balkans and Israel. I was very disappointed that such serious subjects were treated with not exactly side-splitting humour. They just went to add evidence to something that Moore himself suggests - that Americans are largely ignorant to anything that doesn't directly involve the US.
I hope to see more of Moore's anti-Bush crusade. He excels at dogged pursuit of a single issue. I hope he sticks to that instead of getting side-tracked.
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