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on 12 May 2015
Detailed and well reserched insight into the final days of the Allies rush to capture Nazi Berlin.
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on 7 July 2015
When you read this you really feel for the people involved and what they endured a riveting read
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on 2 November 2014
Excellent book, well written with many interesting facts viewed from all sides in the conflict
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 22 March 2004
At first I thought that this book did not seem as good as Beevor's 'Stalingrad' and other previous publications. But as I read on it became more interesting and more historically accurate. I used this book to aid some history coursework I was doing for A level and I believe it helped me greatly. The book uses a variety of lexis, leaving this book open to a wide readership. I found the book reasonably easy-reading because of the use of excellent descriptive lexis, allowing Beevor to convey his points in a stylish way.
I would recommend this book to anyone interested in this period of modern history, one of the most vital, in my opinion. This book gets into the mind and heart of Berlin and Germany during the oppressive years of the Third Reich and domineering Nazi rule. This is a very good publication. If I were to be pedantic, I could say that the book is a little too lengthy, although it is difficult to find any specific faults.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 18 August 2010
I'm not an academic historian so perhaps this book was the wrong choice for me. However, it appears to be in every bookshop in the land beckoning ordinary members of the public like myself who have a passing interest in things historical. After finishing this book I can't say I am very much the wiser as to the events around Berlin in 1945. At the front of the book are amassed all the maps complete with dozens of arrows all over the place: completely useless. Far better if they had been placed where they were relevant in the text. Then the reader is bewildered with the names of dozens of different armies commanded by dozens of different generals - Russian and German. I like to put a name to a face so, for me, some portraits of the main protagonists would have been enormously helpful along with a Who's Who list. The only general that sticks in my head is Zhukov - the rest is just a blur. It's a book with just one damn fact after another. I think watching the last episodes of The World At War would have been far more informative along with reading A Woman in Berlin to get the personal perspective. My copy will end up in the charity shop - not worth taking up space on my bookshelf and not a book I would ever want to refer to again.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 12 November 2007
As a great fan of War History books, especially Russian front WWII, I started this title with great expectations and was not disappointed. Beevor writes the story as a factual novel, and this approach, rather than the completely factual approach of many historians gives it a much greater human interest angle. As a result, when you read, you get a great feeling for the sense of hopelessness, trepidation and fear of the German population facing the Russian onslaught than I had ever found with any similar book. Definite 5 stars. I also think it is better than his other book, Stalingrad.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 22 March 2004
Bevoors "The Fall of Berlin" is an outstanding, breathtaking account on the endgame of world war II. Wellwritten, well informed and particularly honest on the brutality of the Red Army. This is important, since "official history" up to now has hushed down the barbaric behaviour of the soviet soldiers. Its also on time someone can tell the russians the truth about their past, smashing the false, glorifying image their masters have presented to them. A people who has been fed with lies for so long time should take the opportunity to get enlightened about what they really are made of.
This is important for another reason as well: Rape, loothing and indiscriminate violence has been the daily staple for the people living in Tchecnhya for a decade now. Russian soldiers are certainly still carrying out the mark of their tradition. Some people never learn, and obviously the russian military are not capable of teaching themselves. One should read Bevoors book with this in mind: the barbary is living on in Caucasus.
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on 7 November 2014
Excellent reading but its a must to read Stalingrad first.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 24 March 2014
Seller posted quickly and as described. The book itself is typical journalist-does-historian. Lifted almost entirely from Naimark and with no citing of original sources... sloppy bibliography which also detracts from authenticity of some "case studies". That said, entertaining read considering the subject (and if you ignore the thieving of ideas)
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 21 January 2003
Anthony Beevor's best-selling account of the death throws of the Third Reich - young boys, old men and foreign SS volunteers battle desperately for the capital against the rapacious advance of the Red Army, whilst outside the capital German armies once separated by the three thousand miles between the eastern and western fronts are now only one days' march apart. This book deals particularly well with the period from January to April 1945 along the whole of the Eastern Front in Poland and Germany, especially the ravaging of East Prussia and the Soviet advance into Pomerania and Silesia. There are also interesting details on the French volunteers of the SS Charlemagne battalion. This book is definitely an interesting read for those new to this subject, but those who have read the 1966 book, "The Last Battle" by Cornelius Ryan, will find "Berlin: The Downfall 1945" something of a disappointment. Beevor's book falls down somewhat in its treatment of events once the Soviets cross the Oder-Neisse Line. Although we are treated to the Soviet perspective of the Battle of the Seelow Heights, the Germans hardly get a look in. I also found Beevor's descriptions of the locations of the two German armies to the south of Berlin confusing and the maps insufficiently detailed. And post-Seelow, the German forces east and north of Berlin are scarcely mentioned. As for the battle for the city of Berlin itself, the treatment is adequate and there are some interesting insights, but here again Beevor's book comes off very much second best compared with "The Last Battle". "Berlin: The Downfall 1945" is definitely worth a read, particularly for information on the wider Eastern Front at the beginning of 1945, but nearly 40 years after its original publication, the Ryan book remains the masterpiece on the fall of Berlin itself.
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