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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, readable account of famous 'little war.'
It is almost a rite of passage for men of a certain age to have seen - and fallen in love with (in a manly way) - the film 'Zulu' with Stanley Baker and, of course, Michael Caine.

Such men can be spotted by their occassional use of phrases like 'sixty, I think we got sixty' or 'hold them, hold them!' etc etc. Fascination with the Zulu War bites early and holds...
Published on 5 Jan 2009 by Kentspur

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75 of 95 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too many serious mistakes
Given the author's admission in his Acknowledgements that he spent only a year researching and writing the book, it's hard not to feel that it is hurried. His prose is engaging and whisks the reader through the rather sad tale easily enough, but there are errors and omissions aplenty, and anyone with an interest in the war will easily spot the influence of recent...
Published on 9 Oct 2004


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good read, 15 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Zulu (Paperback)
after Zulu and Zulu dawn a completely different look about what actually happened, it shows how flaw English military thinking was.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saul David, 24 May 2013
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This review is from: Zulu (Paperback)
The TRUE STORY of Isandlwana and Rorkes Drift. Not the Hogwash presented to the public in the form of the film Zulu. Still I did enjoy the film.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Gripping History, 22 Feb 2013
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A well told history of this sorry time. Tells the story from all sides: British, Zulu, officers, men and warriors.

I enjoyed the accounts of heroism on both sides. The participants come across as ordinary people in an extraordinary situation.

There is a very large cast of characters and sometimes I found it difficult to keep up.

I recommend this book.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great read from start to finish, 5 Oct 2012
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This review is from: Zulu (Hardcover)
this book is a very interesting read. it is like a epic movie .defeats victories mistakes the end of a royal dynesty bravery and brutality on both sides you could not write a better script.i found this a much better read than ian knights book .this book drags you in and wont let go till the end .it brings the people more to life than ian knights book .graet battle descriptions from both the british and zulus.and some interesting pictures aswell great book a must read [ian knights book is good but i think this is better]saul david hits the mark .
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a terrific read, 30 Aug 2009
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Mr. T. Day (Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Zulu (Paperback)
This book reminds me of Michael Asher's excellent `Khartoum': it covers a similar period of British Imperialism in Africa (late 19C) and even includes some of the same characters - both political and military leaders in England (like the Duke of Cambridge, Commander-in-Chief of the British Army) and officers on the ground (like Lt. Colonel Redvers Buller). Like Asher's book, `Zulu' is superbly written, the narrative carrying the reader along at a breathless pace. I found it hard to put this book down and looked forward to each evening's instalment. Make no mistake, however, this is no mere boys-own adventure but a meticulously researched and referenced historical account of one of Britain's least glorious imperial episodes.

The Zulu War of 1879 was wholly unnecessary, provoked by two British expansionists - Sir Bartle Frere , Governor of the Cape and Ld. Chelmsford, Commander-in-Chief of the British Army in South Africa - who shared a vision for a confederation of South African states under British dominion. Between them, they engineered events to justify the invasion and annexation of Zululand, rejecting all Zulu attempts at a negotiated peace and keeping their political and military superiors in London largely in the dark about what they were doing until it was too late.

Whilst I happily give this book top marks, I have two criticisms. The first is minor: it could do with a glossary of Zulu, Boer and military terms. The second is more substantial: David spends a lot of time seeking to show that Ld. Chelmsford was almost entirely responsible for the disastrous early defeat at Isandlwana in which the Zulu army slaughtered to a man an entire British column of c.1500 men. At the time, Chelmsford, who (fortuitously for him) had left the Isandlwana camp before the Zulu attack, sought to blame those subordinates he had left in charge. David's argument rests to large extent on the observation that Chelmsford had assumed direct command of the column in question (which he had) and that he had failed to issue explicit orders to his subordinates prior to his departure, leaving them unclear about who was in charge and woefully unprepared for a Zulu attack (also true). Whilst none of this can be denied, it seems to me that several of his subordinates, notably Colonels Glyn, Pulleine and Durnford had a responsibility to use their common sense, not to mention their military experience, to `fill in' the details left out by their boss: none of them did. The fact is that the entire officer class in S. Africa at the time was guilty of arrogance and complacency and underestimated the military nous and sheer courage of the Zulus. And more importantly, the much more serious charge against Chelmsford, of which there can be no doubt whatsoever over his guilt, is that he started an unnecessary war that led to the deaths of 1500 British army personnel and many thousands of Zulu Warriors.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Zulu - Too much revision?, 29 Feb 2008
This review is from: Zulu (Paperback)
I am sorry but I cannot agree that this work provides the "definitive" account of the Zulu War. It is a useful revisionist "take" on the conflict but in seeking to expose the cowardice and venality of a few Dr David has ignored the courage and self-sacrifice of the many - both black and white. The work reads as a very hurried piece and many of David's statements do not "square" (in my opinion) with those of other researchers. If you are a keen student of the Zulu War you will probably want to buy this book. You should read it in conjunction with the rest of your Zulu War library and make a balanced comparision/judgement as you read.

If you want to buy a single volume, well researched and totally fair assessent of this sad conflict, buy "The Washing of the Spears" by Donald R Morris. This remains - for me at least - the definitive one volume study of this war.
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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truth more thrilling - and depressing - than fiction, 20 Oct 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Zulu (Hardcover)
This was a book I read in one sitting. Pretty much everything I thought I knew about the Zulu War turns out to have been wrong. The war was launched with a cheerful cynicism that makes the manoeuverings before the Iraq War look the pinnacle of high-mindedness; the defence of Rorke's Drift was deliberately hyped to blanket out the bad news of Isandlhwana. Sound familiar? Yet if this is clearly a book written in the context of our own concerns and foreign policy headaches, it is no less rigorous in its scholarship, or its sensitivity to 19th Century mores, for that. Furthermore, David has a novelist's talent for narrative. An exciting read in every way.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ZULU, 20 Jun 2009
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This review is from: Zulu (Paperback)
I love the epic battles the British put up against the Zulu's. Hence the perchase of this book.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Zulu, 21 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Zulu (Paperback)
This boo was bought for someone else so cannot rally comment on it. If its as good as the film then it should make interesting reading
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Zulu
Zulu by Saul David (Paperback - 28 July 2005)
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