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69 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Confirming and thought-provoking.
This is a feel-good book for anyone who thinks a bit about society and their place in it. Alain de Boton is like an incredibly well-read and eloquent participant in a discussion taking place in your head, confirming and developing so many thoughts and ideas that you've always had but are unlikely to have had the chance to ever analyse properly.
Importantly, the book...
Published on 13 Sep 2005 by David

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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Is status really worth having?
Status Anxiety puts forward a proposition about society that is genuinely compelling and quite convincing. The book follows a logical structure starting with a discussion of the causes of status anxiety and finishes with some inspiring solutions. The text is generally clear and straightforward, although disappointingly has a tendency at times to ramble into unnecessarily...
Published on 10 Jun 2004 by gpk2002


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69 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Confirming and thought-provoking., 13 Sep 2005
By 
David (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Paperback)
This is a feel-good book for anyone who thinks a bit about society and their place in it. Alain de Boton is like an incredibly well-read and eloquent participant in a discussion taking place in your head, confirming and developing so many thoughts and ideas that you've always had but are unlikely to have had the chance to ever analyse properly.
Importantly, the book steers clear of direct instruction on how you should respond to society, and for me it was the regularly evoked chains of thought that provided the greatest moments of realisation and satisfaction.
Taken at face value and read quickly, this book would still be a very interesting read, but it becomes a truly excellent one when used as an informed launch-pad for your own judgements, thoughts and ideas.
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71 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heal Me Mr De Boton, 18 Mar 2004
By 
Mr. Cp Cavell-clarke "Elston Gunn" (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Hardcover)
Having loved Alain De Botton's previous books I approached Satatus Anxiety with some trepidation. Would it live up to it's author's own standards. The answer is a resounding yes. Status Anxiety is as well researched and as witty book as you could read.
In fact Alain de Botton might be the greatest labour saving device since the personal computer. He's read all the books we know we should have, and with a cheeky anecdotal style he makes sense of our lives while leaving the sense of his sources un-diminished. In The Consolations of Philosophy, he digested and explained the great philosophers, giving us an executive summary for coping with our jealousies and the anxiety of being human. Status Anxiety, finds De Botton analysing the ox-coveting curtain-twitcher in all of us. Ours is an age where we spend it like Beckham even if we can't quite earn it, Status Anxiety goes some way to revealing why. Alain de Botton, every home should have one.
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51 of 54 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Modern life and human nature, 3 Feb 2005
By 
ejtooth (Glasgow United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Paperback)
This book is divided into two sections: the first defining the problem the second possible solutions
The first section is a compelling analysis of the human condition and how our (modern) world plays upon our predisposition and fears. The second section, while equally well reasoned took me to where I could see dry land but left me stranded on a sand bar. It offers no new solutions but only the consolations of philosophy politics religion or non-conformity. In short de Botton concedes that we are captive to our often punishing assessment of ourselves as handed to us by society and faced with that, perhaps the best we can do is to change the way we consider that assessment - to change one value system for another more humane.
Having said that, these solutions are solutions and certainly well worth considering, however I suspect that the type of person who buys this book may have covered much of this ground already.
I don't wish to appear negative about a book that I valued and will certainly recommend and it is perhaps to his credit as a scholar, that he is honest enough not to peddle any simple solutions - but - part of me wished he had sold me something and not just set out the stall.

I found the book clear well reasoned well written and understandable. It is also a good read - this was a book that I read in a couple of days. It is obvious that Alain de Botton has an enviable understanding of his subject and it was a pleasure for a lazy reader to be guided through such a wide tapestry of thinkers - I have in the past tried to read some of these authors but have been defeated by their verbiage. All in all a very good read and a valuable tool to make you assess the way you live your life and react to the world and other people
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Is status really worth having?, 10 Jun 2004
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Hardcover)
Status Anxiety puts forward a proposition about society that is genuinely compelling and quite convincing. The book follows a logical structure starting with a discussion of the causes of status anxiety and finishes with some inspiring solutions. The text is generally clear and straightforward, although disappointingly has a tendency at times to ramble into unnecessarily philosophical language - destroying the clarity of thought meticulously built up over several pages.
Stick with it though, and you will find yourself thinking more deeply about what status is and whether it is really worth having.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not his best work, 17 Mar 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Hardcover)
The beauty of The Art of Travel was the way that de Botton intertwined the travel experiences of characters from the last 3000 years of civilisation with his own, present-day experiences. He uses similar figures from history to illustrate and ease our anxieties about status, but fails to link history to modern-day situations in the same engaging way. Apart from the fact that this makes the narrative rather flat, one is unfortunately left with the impression that perhaps de Botton does not experience these anxieties clearly himself. He comes across as the detached intellectual without a true grasp of the realities of modern life.
Never-the-less, interesting subject matter that made me realise that unless you divorce happiness from status, happiness will be a very elusive state of mind.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great pleasure, 10 Jun 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Hardcover)
I read Anxiety Satus with great pleasure. I have read all of Alain de Botton's books and they just get better and better. While I don't endorse all of his stated opinions, I delight in his style of presentation and the musicality of prose; and this appreciation is heightened by the fact that he presents opinions with which I ocassionally disagree. And then, all the other stuff; historical, philosophical and literary references etc. to seduce the reader. Alain de Botton is a philosopher he communicates simply, ideas that matter.
As a cynic who never understood status and it's pursuit ( or at least the status I was expected to pursue) this book has given me an understanding of what it is all about and so enabled me to adopt a kinder attitude to my husband who is frequently tormented by such concerns. But even more importantly it has made me feel ok about being different - I had for years been feigning interest in my friends' and colleagues' new trophies. They of course atributed to me a share of the love my husband earned with his own generous collection. While I don't intend coming out of the closet just yet - de Botton has made it a possibility for the future.
Read it and see what it does for you.
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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A superficial but entertaining skim, 9 Jan 2006
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Paperback)
I enjoyed the TV programme which preceded this book, it was nice to see alternative ideas to the depressing aggressive consumerism which domniates TV presented. The book would serve as a very good introduction to thinking about these alternative ideas, but it is a superficial skim through. It is written in a lively, tongue-in-cheek style which is what gets Alain de Botton comissioned in the first place, but if you want something meatier, go to some of the many writers and artists he quotes liberally from.
The book only deals with status attached to wealth and materialism and ignores the complexities of social status. In the chapter on bohemia, for example, he doesn't address the way that being 'cultured' and part of an artistic community is often itself used as a badge of status to mark superiority. Artists are often perceived as having, or certainly claim to have, a greater sensitivity and insight to the common herd. As an academic I'm sure he knows how many people acquire knowledge and ideas as trophies to lord it over the less well educated. He doesn't explore the hierarchies inherent in these alternative communities, and the ways in which they include and exclude.
It is deceptively easy to make philosophy accessible, and Alain de Botton does an admirable job. This book is great if you are looking for an introduction, but go elsewhere if these ideas are not new to you. Good selection of pictures too - especially the cartoons.
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62 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thought-provoking and humorous, 5 Mar 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Hardcover)
Although there are lots of other books by this author this is the first I've read. I hadn't come across the expression status anxiety before, and yet it describes feelings I have definitely had but haven't necessarily been able to articulate.
It's a serious but funny read, which makes difficult things coherent in a style that frequently had me laughing out loud. It's a big subject and the first part of the book outlines the history and causes of status anxiety - covering history, literature and philosophy. I particularly enjoyed the 'cures' in the second half - which include humour, art, bohemia and reflecting on death.
It's helped me to know that other people may share my anxieties and the book has already provoked a revealing conversation with friends over a glass of wine! Thinking about who might come to your funeral also helps sort out priorities with friends, life, work, etc.
I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone thinking of buying it.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, thought provoking, well written., 26 April 2008
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Paperback)
De Botton investigates anxiety about societal status in this book.

He details five causes:
1. Lovelessness: perceptions of place in the world can be a derivative of the love we receive.
2. Snobbery: poverty may cause material problems but snobbery will cause anxiety of one's status.
3. Expectation: expectations of status, directly cause anxiety.
4. Meritocracy: meritocracies remove excuses for failure and thus increase status anxiety.
5. Dependence: we have dependence on our temporal talents, luck, work and global economics. Status anxiety can be determined by things that we cannot control.

Following the causes are five solutions:
1. Philosophy: seek happy mediums and trust in logic rather than the opinions of others.
2. Art: expressions in art such as tradegy or comedy can make us think beyond our status anxiety.
3. Politics: an understanding of politics can help us understand our problems.
4. Christianity: Christianity is a challenge of materialistic ideals by placing value on things that are derivative from the human condition.
5. Bohemia: following the decline of Christianity, Bohemia has in some respects substituted it. For the bohemian, the church has become the cafe. Bohemia too argues a non material philosophy.

It's very important to stress this is not a self-help, or change your life book. It is a philosophical analysis of how objects and properties in society effect perceptions of the self and the anxiety that may cause. While the solutions have not removed the concept of hierarchy, they have provided new types of hierarchy and values whereby those who were not able or did not want to participate in conventional worldly ideals have had other outlets for achieving a happy life.

Like all of De Botton's books, this book is peppered with interesting pictures and quirky facts such as:

1. The word snob coming from the habbit of Oxford and Cambridge universities writing sine nobilitate (without nobility) or s.nob beside the names of students who were not aristocrates.
2. The story of Nixon meeting Krushchev presenting the american Taj Mahal

He also references philosophers and intellectuals, for example:
1. David Hume thought we are more jealous of those close to us.
2. Aristotle belief on social predestination. You could be born a slave and so be it.
3. Locke and Hobbes thought that individuals give up individuality to join societies in return for protection. It was symbiotic relationship between individual and society.

Adam Smith, Benjamin Franklin, Augustine, William James, De Toqville, Rousseau, Marx, Mandeville, Herbert Spencer, Michael Young, Boltan Hall, La Bruyere, Machiavell, Guicciardini, Kant, Chamford, Voltaire, Schopenhauer, Freud, Bernard Shaw are also referenced when he makes various points.

This is the beauty of De Botton's writing. He takes nuggests of wisdom from a voluminous amout of intellectuals. He then present these snippets in a context which is well argued and makes sense. He's a talented, objective writer who posseses erudite knowledge and an abilitiy to explain succintly. This book is enjoyable read for anyone looking for an interesting and thought provoking examination into an ineluctable aspect of the human condition.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unexpected pleasure, 31 May 2010
This review is from: Status Anxiety (Paperback)
I admit that when I first heard of Status Anxiety I thought it was an oddly titled book about shallow people who were more interested in keeping up with the Jones than real life. Then I got round to reading it.

In Status Anxiety Alain de Botton takes a look at the tendency we all have to judge ourselves against others or what we perceive to be the view and judgments of others. In the first part of the book he carefully shows the many ways this anxiety takes form, some subtle some not. He shows how the development of Western Society has exacerbated and contributed to the development of status anxiety, while trying to improve the lot of all.

The next section of the book discusses the various ways we can overcome this anxiety, by changing your viewpoint. He gives different ways of looking at life in order to free one from the restrictions on status anxiety can induce.

Along the way Alain introduces us to a wide range of ideas and history. This is done in a highly readable and enjoyable way. I have enjoyed several of Alain de Botton's books and rate this close to "The Consolations of Philosophy", my personal favourite. If you enjoy his works, this will not disappoint. If you are new to him, it is an excellent starting place.
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Status Anxiety
Status Anxiety by Alain de Botton (Paperback - 13 Jan 2005)
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