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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read that entertains with everyday examples
Malcolm Gladwell takes us on a journey through a vast range of human experiences (such as racism, dating, identifying genuine works of art, autism, police shooting the wrong man), exploring how our pre-programmed unconscious may be influencing us far more than we realize.

Blink is defined as "the content and origin of those instantaneous impressions and...
Published on 2 Jan 2007 by Tim Burness

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135 of 140 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting enough, but an expanded article rather than a book
Gladwell certainly writes well and entertainingly about an interesting subject - but as each new chapter started I began by thinking 'right, NOW we are going to have some advances, NOW the arguments are going to be explored and developed,' and basically, they never were. The book said what it had to say really within the first couple of chapters, with examples of where...
Published on 22 Feb 2007 by Lady Fancifull


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135 of 140 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting enough, but an expanded article rather than a book, 22 Feb 2007
By 
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
Gladwell certainly writes well and entertainingly about an interesting subject - but as each new chapter started I began by thinking 'right, NOW we are going to have some advances, NOW the arguments are going to be explored and developed,' and basically, they never were. The book said what it had to say really within the first couple of chapters, with examples of where 'thin-slicing' worked, and examples of where it didn't.

In the end, what it came down to was 'well here are situations whereby 'intuition' or a snap response as opposed to an overload of information wins out' - and whoops, 'here we have situations where people have made some very serious errors of judgement because they have worked from gut feelings that are actually prejudiced, and their 'unconcious biases' have been lethal.' And here are some more examples of these situations. And here are even more examples. And - well here are a few more.

But the book as a whole didn't really go anywhere.
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88 of 94 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book seems unfinished, 14 Feb 2005
By 
Coert Visser "solutionfocusedchange.com" (Driebergen Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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I am slightly disappointed with this book. As a reader who really enjoyed Gladwell's previous book 'The Tipping Point' I had looked forward to his new book. In some respects the book is like I hoped it would be: the topic choice is very interesting, the writing style is smooth and entertaining, the many anecdotes are very enjoyable and there are some interesting descriptions of experiments. Anyone should be able to pick up some interesting stories, points, facts and views from this book.
What disappoints me though is that the book does not really deliver what it promises. In the introduction chapter the author promises to answer three questions: 1) Can Blink-descisions be as good as decisions made cautiously and deliberately, 2) When should we trust our instincts and when should we be wary of them?, 3) (how) can our snap judgments and first impressions be educated and controlled? Although the many stories in the book certainly imply many clues to answers to these questions, explicit answers to these three questions are not clearly given. In fact, when I finished reading I felt like the author had forgotten to include an concluding and integrating chapter in which he would explicitly answer these questions and summarize and conclude. But that chapter is really missing. Due to that the book really lacks clarity.
Although this book is disappointing I won't stop following Gladwell's writings. His previous book was better than this one and I'll bethis next one will be better too.
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73 of 78 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This book has everything, apart from a coherent argument, 28 Jan 2007
By 
Nelkin (London, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
Blink is well-written with a fluent, enjoyable style, and is full of amusing vignettes to catch your interest. By the end, though, I was a little confused as to when it's okay to 'thin-slice', and when the author thinks we shouldn't. Gladwell introduces us to experts who can marshal their knowledge and experience of their subject to make reliable snap judgements in the blink of an eye. Then we meet other experts whose immense knowledge actually becomes clutter that gets in the way of reliable quick decision-making. And then we have anti-experts whose disdain for academic and theoretical knowledge enables them to come out tops in the thin-slicing stakes. And then we have the complete know-nothings of our world who, not surprisingly, guess wrongly about more or less everything.

And so the roundabout turns, all through the book. If you're seeing a pattern in all of it, then you're doing better than me.

I was particularly irritated by a section in chapter six where Gladwell toys with a concept he calls "temporary autism." He is examining the question of why, in extreme life-threatening situations, sometimes 'thin-slicing' works and sometimes it has disastrous consequences. Sometimes a police officer fires a gun at an armed criminal and saves the lives of innocent people; other times they shoot an innocent person and end up in court on a murder charge. In such fight-or-flight situations, an increase in heart-rate sends our bodies into a kind of survival mode -- that is, our nervous systems basically close down anything that isn't essential to dealing with the immediate crisis. Our perception of time slows down; we become prone to tunnel-vision; and our interpretation of other people's behaviour becomes more than usually reliant on stereotyping, rather than an emotionally-nuanced reading of the other person's mental state. The disastrous cases are the ones in which this process has gone too far and heightened arousal has given way to panic. Gladwell compares the 'mind blindness', as he calls it, of people in this situation with the indifference to social stimuli that is characteristic of autism -- autistic people typically have an inability to 'read' the emotions of others, and in fact look upon other people much as they would a chair or a table, as objects with no inner life. Gladwell argues that people in extreme stress, who have temporarily lost their ability to reason and read emotional signals, are "effectively autistic" at that particular time; their state of 'mind blindness' is, he thinks, a state of "temporary autism."

But you don't need to be a psychologist to see how weak that comparison is. The author has simply picked out one characteristic of autism, noted that a similar characteristic appears to be present when a person is in fight-or-flight mode, and then announced that the two conditions are "effectively" the same. And that, unfortunately, is characteristic of the slipshod thinking that permeates this book.

Overall, this is an entertaining read, and a useful jumping-off point perhaps for more serious investigations. But the book doesn't really add up to a coherent whole -- it's more like a collection of amusing shaggy-dog stories without a punchline.
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59 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Blink and you'll miss it, 20 Jan 2006
I don't exaggerate when I tell you that there's a ground-breaking two-page essay in there struggling to get out. Some day a book will be really written about this topic, and will cover such ideas as what fast cognition is, how it relates to thought, how to do it, how to make it conscious, how to recognize when you're doing it wrong, with practical lessons. Unfortunately, this 200-page pile of belaboured anecdotes is not that book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read that entertains with everyday examples, 2 Jan 2007
By 
Tim Burness (Brighton, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
Malcolm Gladwell takes us on a journey through a vast range of human experiences (such as racism, dating, identifying genuine works of art, autism, police shooting the wrong man), exploring how our pre-programmed unconscious may be influencing us far more than we realize.

Blink is defined as "the content and origin of those instantaneous impressions and conclusions that spontaneously arise whenever we meet a new person or confront a complex situation or have to make a decision under conditions of stress". Human behaviour appears to be far more influenced by split-second decisions than large amounts of information e.g. results of scientific experiments, planning, various rules and regulations that we may know are the "right" thing. While this can be useful for seeing the truth of a situation, we may also get it completely wrong. The chapter "The Warren Harding Error" demonstrates this. We may assume that someone who is incredibly good-looking is also likely to possess qualities such as intelligence and integrity. Such an assumption can of course be completely inaccurate!

The author held my attention with some interesting and original explanations of everyday human behaviour. It's an easy and very entertaining read, but afterwards I was left feeling rather unsatisfied, as if the writing was somehow insubstantial?
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50 of 54 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Informed Intuition Beats Analysis and Knee-Jerk Prejudices, 3 Mar 2005
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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Like The Tipping Point, Blink has a very simple point which it elaborates from a variety of perspectives. In this case, the point is that our subconscious mind can integrate small, subtle clues to very quickly make great decisions . . . as long as we have been trained to know what clues to focus on.
In developing that simple idea, Mr. Gladwell makes the case for "going with your gut" in many instances . . . especially when time is of the essence (such as during emergencies and in combat). He also rescues analysis to show how analysis can train people to know what to look for so they can use their instincts more effectively.
But instincts have a downside. Based on conditioning, we make associations that are harmful to ourselves and to others. He recounts how an innocent man became a victim of under trained, over stimulated police officers and how even African-Americans display prejudice against African-Americans.
Most of the book is devoted to looking at prejudice and how to overcome it. For those who are interested in that subject, this book will be much more interesting than for those who want to understand how to improve their decision-making.
I thought that the book failed to reach the average mark as a book about how to improve decision-making. There's no real guidance for what we can each do to improve our important decisions. We are just left with hope that we can do better. I graded the book up a bit because I liked the insights into racism.
I thought the material on branded products was much too long and didn't add anything to what I knew already.
Mr. Gladwell writes well, though, so it's mostly a pleasant trip in the book. He makes science more interesting, but leaves a bit too much of the science out to make the results satisfying. He's writing for a dumbed-down audience with science backgrounds at the 8th grade level.
The book's opening made me feel like I was really going to learn something. As the book continued, I found myself disappointed compared to the high expectations that the opening set for learning better decision-making practices. As a result, all I got from the book was to pay attention to external clues and my own physiological cues as I react to a situation. I already do that, so I felt that the book didn't really deliver a solid benefit to me beyond teaching me a few new stories about decision makers.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blink again, again and again, 4 Oct 2006
By 
L. Hogan (Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
It's been said before and I'll say it again: interesting but repetitive. And perhaps lacking in depth. Im not a phsycologist but I do have a scientific background and I found the text very basic. The anecdotes illustrate the point Mr Gladwell wants to make, but he doesnt really offer an explanation for how these snap judgements work, or even why we should be able to make them. The book is basically a collection of examples of the phenomenon rather than an exploration of it. That said, Mr Gladwell's prose is clear and easily read. It's a book for any reader who is interested in the world around them and how we interact with it, and would certainly keep you interested enough during a long flight or train journey. On the basis of this book I would probably read Mr Gladwell's other bestseller, "The Tipping Point", but only if I could borrow it from someone.
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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too much psuedo science!, 19 Feb 2008
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
The brain and thought analysis are always interesting subjects. Gladwell uses quirky anecdotes to present his hypotheisis which is essentially that visceral or instinctive thinking can sometimes out perform rational analysis. Although some of the anecdotes are interesting and thought provoking (particularly the one on racism), I found the lack of scientifc methodolgy in his arguments extremly annoying. Something is either appropriate for scientific analysis or it is not. One would think thought and brain analysis fits perfectly into the scientific remit. But this book subsituites science with psuedo science. All too often anecdotes are used. But anyone can cherry pick anecdotes to argue anything, so what's the objective of this book? Is it a scientific hypotheisis or just some writer looking for a "wow".

I think the art of popular science writing is the ability to explain something complicated, in simple terms and thus bring something which is esoteric to the masses. There are many talented writed who can do exactly this: Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking or Robert Winston.

However, I am always a bit apprenhensive when a journalist with little or no scientific background enters the scientific paradigm. All too often, they substitute the scientific approach for the "wow wow wow" approach. By the end of this book, Gladwell didn't make change my mind.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting stuff, though slightly lightweight., 21 Mar 2005
By 
J. D. Aspinall (South West England) - See all my reviews
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Firstly, this book IS quite interesting. It deals with what Gladwell calls thin-slicing, what most of us experience as a gut feeling or intuition. Gladwell makes the argument for having faith in our own powers of perception, and not spoiling our desicion making by over-loading with details. This theory is backed up with some interesting tales of psychological experimentation. The results are, as I said, interesting. But that's it. That's all. It's interesting, nothing else. The book doesn't go into, for example, how we could improve our powers of perception, it just details what could be possible, and leaves it at that.
I was left feeling just a little empty by this book, I thought I would learn something practical, that I could continue to develop some skill in. But no. It's okay, but that's all.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars dumbed down and over processed, 2 Sep 2009
By 
This review is from: Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (Paperback)
HI
if you want to read and forget it this is the book for you. If you want to understand the topic try gut feelings by Gerd Gigerenzer instead. I found the lack of bibliography intensely annoying. If you want to follow up the ideas avoid this book.
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Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell (Paperback - 23 Feb 2006)
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